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I'd recommend using onboarding techniques and some simple animation to show this element and its importance. A good example is the Floating Action Button (FAB) :: Transitions part of Material Design, specially the Morph and Full Screen sub-items. You'll see how the FAB morphs into another element. (visit the page for a more clear video, this is a quick ...


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You are talking about an on-boarding feature. An on-boarding feature is a thing which introduces new users to your system by putting a spotlight on one or more features. the spotlight can include some additional info via a speech bubble, etc. However, after the user has used that feature you no longer show the spotlight. This technique is also useful for ...


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The answer is right next to where you pointed in the screenshot. The yellow button. You want to emphasize a menu item because it is something different or new, you can let it stand out by adding a color or border around it, giving it some sort of a ghost-button feel while it's still "just" part of your topmenu. It won't be annoying either, because it won't ...


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If I interpret your question properly, it seems your main issue with the way Angular Material recommends implementing tooltips is this: Maybe that'll do in mobile, but in complex web applications with multiple interactive elements on screen it seems a bit overconfident to assume the user will be always catch where the tooltip came from. I personally ...


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According to Material Design Guidelines: Tooltips don’t have directional arrows; instead, they rely on motion emanating from the source to convey direction. If we look at the desktop example listed, you will see multiple elements next to each other. Even though the tooltip borders onto its neighbouring element, it doesn't overlap it. The tooltip is ...



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