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I have two examples to share that were successful: Long titles exceed character limits. When the titles are force-truncated and cutting off distinguishing info. You can easily wind up with a list of 3 or more titles that appear identical to one another. A tooltip makes a nice fallback so users can find info without leaving the page (which adds more cog ...


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Mac OSX has a right-click contextual menu somewhat like yours: I'm concerned about a couple things in your solution. (1) Keep in mind that stray clicks happen. As people mouse around they sometimes touch the mouse button enough to click things they didn't intend to click. So every word you can mark as known has to also be markable as unknown. It looks ...


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A fullscreen modal would be a solution. See example below from Producthunt. With this approach, both the close button in the top left corner and the browser back button can be used since the modal page has it's own url. The search results page: https://www.producthunt.com/search The modal: https://www.producthunt.com/tech/stack-overflow-jobs


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From the website you linked: Tooltips are a quick way to provide extended information on a term or action on a page In text there could be a number of applications for this: Provide glossary information on a term the user might be confused about Show footnote text without having to take the user to the bottom of the page Show target of links (if you'...


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Although many mobile browsers will close the newly opened tab page when user hits back button, so they would land on the original page, it is not a devil's thought to display the help/read-more content in a dynamic section (eg.: "div") of the current page - if it is not too long and detailed nor it has links to other contents in itself so that it would ...


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It's best practice to always design interfaces based on recognition. If a user recognizes a tooltip graphic like a pencil, they will understand that it may be used for editing something (depending on the context of course). The goal is to reduce the cognitive load of the user and provide a pleasant experience. If you're going to use a tooltip, use one that ...


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To me, the advantage of the balloon tooltip is that the small triangle points directly to the element that it relates to, which reduces ambiguity in a crowded user interface You can argue the user knows where his mouse/finger is pointing, but one scenario it's actually useful for is disseminating screenshots that don't show the mouse pointer or supply ...


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In general, avoid actions that are invoked simply by clicking on a cell value, as these are hidden actions that won't be clear. To me the only thing that would be intuitive is clicking on a cell to get more details about that cell, as this is a standard web drill-down paradigm. As long as the cell value is clearly a link, this will work. But it isn't ...



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