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33

To know if the tooltip should be closable by the user, we should know when it gets displayed. As a mouse-over: no, it is hidden, when the user moves away. On some event: How would it get closed otherwise? Time is not a good option as it would a break accessibility guidelines. Click in text line: Not necessary, but I would provide this option as ...


27

Yes people do use tool tips. For many people tool tips are essential. For example say a person with visual impairments person was using your application. To help them they may be using some assistive technology such as a screen reader. Lets say that some of your buttons only had icons instead of text. How would a screen reader tell the user what the ...


15

If a button, label, or icon has little to no descriptive text or needs some short explanation, then a tooltip works well for this. You can see examples of this all throughout this StackExchange web app, in fact. If we didn't have tooltips on all these up & down arrows next to each answer, some people might think they're for scrolling. But if the text ...


12

From the article Ultimate list of online content readability tests this example is blockquoted. Readability depends on lots of things… how you write how your reader reads (slowly or quickly) where your reader reads (a quiet library or a noisy cafeteria) what your reader is reading (a paperback book or an e-Reader) what experience your ...


11

You will have more sharing if you only use the 2 or 3 most used social network sharing options. I have seen this work time and time again. More is not better.


10

I generally have found that users don't read anything. Especially tool-tips. It would help the power user, but I really don't think "thousands of tech support calls" would be saved. With that said...it doesn't hurt. Why not? For the few customers who appreciate it and read it would have a very nice friendly impact.


10

Microsoft offers some useful guidelines for tooltips—when to use them and when not to. In the Windows User-Experience Interaction Guidelines (a great resource, by the way!), if you look under Tooltips and Infotips, you'll find the heading Is this the right control? and, below that, the heading Design concepts.


9

I believe the balloon is technically referred to as a "callout." Most websites I've seen call the pointy part a "tail." http://www.techsmith.com/learn/snagit/mac/1/written/feedback/


9

Yes. Users don't read, they scan. If you are looking for a particular name, a list organised alphabetically is much easier to scan than putting them all inline in alphabetical order. User can scan the list based on the first letter, without reading the entire name.


8

This is a good idea. To make the tooltip easier to find, you can add a little help icon to disabled controls. Since adding an extra icon beside the control may disturb the layout, you can add the icon to the control itself:


8

I would go with label: textfied (?) for a user who doesn't need the hint, it's safely tucked away AFTER the textbox so it won't distract him. I am assuming the 'tip' here is to guide users who have no idea what to enter in a particular field as opposed to preempting a frequently entered wrong answer (eg: formatting...in which case the hint must always be ...


8

I think it has got to do with accessibility, screen readers can be set (or is it default behavior?) to read the 'title' of the links. This practice makes particular sense for high volume sites like google who probably get a fair number of users using screen readers. note: page from 2005! ref to study how the screenreader reads the TITLE attribute in various ...


7

I couldn't find any conventions on this matter, but I found a couple of libraries where the tooltip seems to be set at a default of 500ms, which seems quite reasonable. Anyway, I think you should go from there and tweak it until it feels right. You can try it out with a few users and evaluate their feedback. ...


7

I think the best solution would be to have a clear indication which controls have tooltips and which don't. For example, you could add a tiny "?" next to these controls (or any other method that works for you and your users). Not only will this clarify to your users which controls have a tooltip, but will also surface potentially hidden functionality: ...


7

The thing with tooltips (as with everything else on screen) is that it increases cognitive load and requires to be processed (read) by the user. So the general question to ask is: does the user need (or want) to see the tooltip permanently, or should be allowed to close it? Is the tooltip really helpful or trivial? I'd say that tooltips in general need ...


6

Yeah, Wikipedia calls them tails too: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speech_balloon


6

It might be for consistency. If users see tooltips on most links/buttons/images, and then they move over something and don't see it, they might wait for it or think the site is broken. Instead of removing the redundant tooltip, it would be better to make useful tooltips for all such elements (or none, if the links are self-explanatory). This is different ...


6

Go green for chilled, red for thrilled. In-between is less extreme. Obviously the intent here is to make it short, snappy and catchy via the two rhymes. That second slightly cheesy almost-but-not-quite rhyme could be endearing in a way. This makes it more memorable not just in the context of meaning of the slider, but perhaps also after leaving the site. ...


6

Design the buttons in such a way that tooltips are almost superfluous. Then my suggestion to name the tooltips would be: scroll up, scroll right, scroll down, scroll left. You're not really moving the map, you're just scrolling through it.


6

If .yoururl.com is not editable, it should be removed from the input bar. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Give an example to reinforce what the expected input is and also, if you want, what the output will look like. On second thought, you can let the user type in the entire URL. URL parsing isn't a ...


5

Is the item something that you can add a tooltip? For instance, on a forgot-password image, I added a tooltip: <a href="{% url password-reset %}"><img src="/media/bitmaps/qmark.png/" title="forgot password?" width="50" height="50" /></a> Which results in Alternately, if it's not some single object(s), then what about storing a ...


5

A technique I use alot is to list out as many possibilities I could think of and then see which one pops out. I think the third one below is better than the others for me. Maybe a different icon, maybe a little smaller, but you get the point.


5

How to display I would not scatter your UI with i-icons or question marks. Instead, use a dotted underline to make it clear that the user can interact with the work but to set it apart from a link. How to interact Keep in mind that on cursor-devices the tooltip is hidden again on mouse-out. You can't do that on touch devices, so make sure the tooltips are ...


5

How about direct share buttons for the 2-3 most used networks, with a 'More' option bringing up a menu; I'd say the menu should include the networks with direct share buttons as well, so the user wouldn't get confused if they only spotted the menu button at the main page. Best of both worlds: lower friction for high use networks + access to lower use ...


4

If something is disabled then it doesn't need to be there, UNLESS it doesn't require an explanation. Otherwise it's just noise for the user. A perfect example of good "disabling" is the "send" button on the iPhone's native SMS app. It's disabled until you enter text. No explanation is needed, yet it does need to be there. Again, if a UI element needs to ...


4

When the user hovers the link, the text "buy it" can appear next to the link. This gives the idea that the link initiates the buying process in a simple fashion. I included an image below: You can include the text "click on a domain to buy" in the page but I wont use the tooltip as it is because the tooltip is pointing to a specific element (which is not ...


4

Please correct me if I am wrong, but in this case it is understable. Tooltips are only shown with labels. Since the left sidebar has a fixed with it can happen that a user chooses a label name that is to long and will be cut off. So now the tooltip shows the complete label name. Because it is probably easier to just do a title on all label links than just ...


4

When you tested this, how was the question phrased? Was it: "Can you complete this form? Which one did you like better?" Or was it: "Which method of invoking tool tip do you like better?" If it is the latter, then you may have inadvertently influenced the outcome in favor of clicking the "i", because the question itself explains to the user what ...


4

You have hidden information first and trying to invent some interaction to return it back. Maybe the problem somewhere in information design. The better solution could be to provide an abstract for each lesson. Having a lot of lessons you could group it by some meaningful way. UPDATE Assuming user constraints (speech, reading, movement difficulties) I ...


4

I agree with Harijs' answer. You need to address the question of why you are using the Tooltip for error handling in the first place. Here is a helpful article: In order to display error messages on forms, you need to consider the following four basic rules: The error message needs to be short and meaningful. The placement of the message ...



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