Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

33

To know if the tooltip should be closable by the user, we should know when it gets displayed. As a mouse-over: no, it is hidden, when the user moves away. On some event: How would it get closed otherwise? Time is not a good option as it would a break accessibility guidelines. Click in text line: Not necessary, but I would provide this option as ...


31

Yes people do use tool tips. For many people tool tips are essential. For example say a person with visual impairments person was using your application. To help them they may be using some assistive technology such as a screen reader. Lets say that some of your buttons only had icons instead of text. How would a screen reader tell the user what the ...


31

The convention is that the question mark indicates extensive help is available, provides an interface for someone having a problem to click, and implies that a more sophisticated means of resolving the problem is being offered. The (i) indicates only that some additional explanatory information is available, but not an extensive help system. Think of an ...


16

If a button, label, or icon has little to no descriptive text or needs some short explanation, then a tooltip works well for this. You can see examples of this all throughout this StackExchange web app, in fact. If we didn't have tooltips on all these up & down arrows next to each answer, some people might think they're for scrolling. But if the text ...


13

From the article Ultimate list of online content readability tests this example is blockquoted. Readability depends on lots of things… how you write how your reader reads (slowly or quickly) where your reader reads (a quiet library or a noisy cafeteria) what your reader is reading (a paperback book or an e-Reader) what experience your ...


13

Observations Browser implementation of tooltips is not predictable. Some browser show tooltips immediately, and some show them after a delay. The position and styling of the tooltips is not predictable across different browsers. Users often miss native browser tooltips because (1) they are small; and (2) most browsers require users to pause the cursor ...


12

Without a delay just moving your mouse around would accidentally make popups appear and flicker across your screen. That'd draw users' attention away from what they're doing if they didn't expect it, and probably annoy them because flickering stuff provides no value to them: it's unlikely they wanted to read the title and unlikely they even have the time to ...


11

You will have more sharing if you only use the 2 or 3 most used social network sharing options. I have seen this work time and time again. More is not better.


10

I believe the balloon is technically referred to as a "callout." Most websites I've seen call the pointy part a "tail." http://www.techsmith.com/learn/snagit/mac/1/written/feedback/


10

I generally have found that users don't read anything. Especially tool-tips. It would help the power user, but I really don't think "thousands of tech support calls" would be saved. With that said...it doesn't hurt. Why not? For the few customers who appreciate it and read it would have a very nice friendly impact.


10

Microsoft offers some useful guidelines for tooltips—when to use them and when not to. In the Windows User-Experience Interaction Guidelines (a great resource, by the way!), if you look under Tooltips and Infotips, you'll find the heading Is this the right control? and, below that, the heading Design concepts.


10

Yes. Users don't read, they scan. If you are looking for a particular name, a list organised alphabetically is much easier to scan than putting them all inline in alphabetical order. User can scan the list based on the first letter, without reading the entire name.


10

The idea here is about simplifying the process for users by making it easier to see what available options are there and allowing them to choose instead of going by a trial by error approach where users try multiple variations of user names and find all are taken leading to additional frustration. Taking an example of signing up for yahoo mail I tried ...


10

This is a bug with the Google UI, and not intentional. You were right to notice the distinction, but it shouldn't be used as any kind of example of good design. As of now (March 2015), Google is in the middle of a long process of migrating its apps and platforms to Material Design, and it will take a while before most apps are compliant. Material Design ...


9

There's a simple and classic solutions for this. You just add a tiny icon letting them know there's a helpful tooltip waiting for them: There a are many occasions where you want to help first time or rare users, but you don't want to clutter the screen with lengthy explanations. Tooltips are a greta solution, but as you mentioned, many people are not ...


8

This is a good idea. To make the tooltip easier to find, you can add a little help icon to disabled controls. Since adding an extra icon beside the control may disturb the layout, you can add the icon to the control itself:


8

I would go with label: textfied (?) for a user who doesn't need the hint, it's safely tucked away AFTER the textbox so it won't distract him. I am assuming the 'tip' here is to guide users who have no idea what to enter in a particular field as opposed to preempting a frequently entered wrong answer (eg: formatting...in which case the hint must always be ...


8

I think it has got to do with accessibility, screen readers can be set (or is it default behavior?) to read the 'title' of the links. This practice makes particular sense for high volume sites like google who probably get a fair number of users using screen readers. note: page from 2005! ref to study how the screenreader reads the TITLE attribute in various ...


7

I think the best solution would be to have a clear indication which controls have tooltips and which don't. For example, you could add a tiny "?" next to these controls (or any other method that works for you and your users). Not only will this clarify to your users which controls have a tooltip, but will also surface potentially hidden functionality: ...


7

The thing with tooltips (as with everything else on screen) is that it increases cognitive load and requires to be processed (read) by the user. So the general question to ask is: does the user need (or want) to see the tooltip permanently, or should be allowed to close it? Is the tooltip really helpful or trivial? I'd say that tooltips in general need ...


7

The difference between the symbols as UI element is that, from the perspective of the system, "?" is passive, and "i" is active: With the "?", the system offers the information to the user, that he needs when he has a question. With the "i", the system offers the additional information to the user, that may be useful even when he does not have a question. ...


6

Yeah, Wikipedia calls them tails too: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speech_balloon


6

I couldn't find any conventions on this matter, but I found a couple of libraries where the tooltip seems to be set at a default of 500ms, which seems quite reasonable. Anyway, I think you should go from there and tweak it until it feels right. You can try it out with a few users and evaluate their feedback. ...


6

A technique I use alot is to list out as many possibilities I could think of and then see which one pops out. I think the third one below is better than the others for me. Maybe a different icon, maybe a little smaller, but you get the point.


6

It might be for consistency. If users see tooltips on most links/buttons/images, and then they move over something and don't see it, they might wait for it or think the site is broken. Instead of removing the redundant tooltip, it would be better to make useful tooltips for all such elements (or none, if the links are self-explanatory). This is different ...


6

Go green for chilled, red for thrilled. In-between is less extreme. Obviously the intent here is to make it short, snappy and catchy via the two rhymes. That second slightly cheesy almost-but-not-quite rhyme could be endearing in a way. This makes it more memorable not just in the context of meaning of the slider, but perhaps also after leaving the site. ...


6

Design the buttons in such a way that tooltips are almost superfluous. Then my suggestion to name the tooltips would be: scroll up, scroll right, scroll down, scroll left. You're not really moving the map, you're just scrolling through it.


6

How about direct share buttons for the 2-3 most used networks, with a 'More' option bringing up a menu; I'd say the menu should include the networks with direct share buttons as well, so the user wouldn't get confused if they only spotted the menu button at the main page. Best of both worlds: lower friction for high use networks + access to lower use ...


6

If .yoururl.com is not editable, it should be removed from the input bar. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Give an example to reinforce what the expected input is and also, if you want, what the output will look like. On second thought, you can let the user type in the entire URL. URL parsing isn't a ...


6

I'm pretty sure it's because Drive is developped by another team than the team who's working on the Google account canvas. More a question of schedule/production rather than UX/UI thought I guess.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible