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5

Speak the user’s language “Form” and “text editor” are UI terms. They vaguely describe what the controls are but not what they do. Step back from the problem and get into your user’s head. You’ve described one aspect that would drive the decision (document linking). Is that the only reason? If so, you need to find ...


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I also prefer 3, and I would make sure to put the notification after the enabled parent page before the disabled child page. That way users know to click on it, but are prevented from trying to click on the disabled one.


1

I prefer 3. The reason is that if you have a couple of greyed out settings, displaying explantory text can become confusing or dazzling to inexperienced users. It is logical that they will try to tap the greyed out setting, in order to try turning it on. The nessecairy information will apear as needed, without overwhelming them. If you are concerned that ...


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You are in a situation where you have a trade off between UI screen real estate and clicks so you need to use your judgement. Like you said, a combobox requires two clicks but it saves the most screen real estate. If saving space is your top priority then a combo box is your answer.


2

I don't think radio buttons are that bad, but as an alternative you could use a slider with the labels outside it.


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Just use three radio buttons (value 1, value 2, disabled). It's the least complicated solution. If you want more separation between the enabled/disabled states, use two radio buttons and a check box


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Interesting question. As some of the other users i think checkboxes are appropriate to your purpose. For the "Locked/Unlocked" option i'd try to use an image with a two state lock, one locked and one unlocked.


1

Here's a toggle that's just slightly different from your options: The difference being that the only text that is visible is the current state. This changes the mind's dialogue from: Oh, a toggle. I see "yes" and "no", but it looks like the "yes" is colored a bit more vividly so I'm going to conclude that it showing "yes". To this: Oh, a toggle. ...


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The checkbox is SIGNIFICANTLY better in terms of familiarity/usability. Use checkboxes and make it as aesthetically pleasing as possible. One option is to reinforce the checkbox state by coloring the whole item when in the checked state: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


9

The checkbox is not dead To your point, a checkbox is perfectly suited to this purpose. In your example, it's not handled with any finesse but it does get the point across. A good UI designer can help you not only "pretty up" your checkbox, but also reduce the friction of interacting with them. The toggle ain't bad either You have to change your thinking ...



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