Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

37

It depends on how you are using it. All caps can be the perfect choice when used correctly. The site you have referenced does look slightly odd to me, this could be because of the typeface itself. Certain typefaces such as Trajan Pro and Bebas consist of only all caps characters. These types of typefaces are usually used very successfully in headers and ...


35

UPPERCASE text is harder to read because the shapes of all the uppercase letters are all rectangular and users are not used to reading text that way. Therefore it is harder to scan, less efficient, and consequently a bad thing for readability. See also this article from UXMovement: Why Text in All Caps is Hard for Users to Read. And quoting from that ...


25

I don't think this is about user intuition - it's much more about writing style and conventions. The norm in forms is that the heading serves a category label to the adjectives/nouns below. So Car Features should do the trick here. Another norm is to use imperative statements, but mostly for interactive controls (not labels), still you could also phrase ...


22

I hate to be this guy, but The W Blog has an article digesting some research suggesting that the presumed "letter shape" theory is incorrect on why CAPS LOCK is harder to read. It's a good article that cites real research you can delve into as deeply as you like, it suggests that the presumed reasons (letter shape ect.) for why UPPERCASE is hard to read are ...


17

I believe that's a preference thing. The main thing is to be consistent with what you decide. It could vary on what section of the app you are talking about too. For example, your buttons and titles might be Title Case capitalized, while your links might be lowercase. Again, just be consistent within the sections that you are standardizing.


11

I think you should avoid it. Brent Simmons recently wrote about word choice, specifically the "Connect" and "Discover" tabs in the new Twitter for iOS app: What we know about people and words People respond best to concrete words, and English speakers respond best to non-Latinate words. When asking your significant other to pick up some milk ...


10

It depends whether the sidebar is related to the header or not. In your first example, the sidebar seems to be related to the title. In your second example, the sidebar seems to be an independent sidebar. Take a look at the Gestalt principles. They can give you some clue about how you can arrange your page to give the correct impression of the ...


9

I would include the heading for the following reasons: If you were to port this design to mobile, you may not be including the primary navigation at the top of the page, thus leaving no way for the user to determine what page they are on. It provides consistency across pages, and allows you to scale if you decide to put drop downs inside those primary ...


7

Both options you presented have drawbacks. Have you considered removing the logout button? Other apps that I log into, such as Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube, have the logout functionality in settings. Is there a specific reason a user would need to logout functionality immediately accessible? Would users of your application need to log out frequently? ...


6

Old fonts were created in a single case, which is now considered to be capital letters. That's when tradition of writing all caps started and that's why people are using all caps fonts like Trajan to make "older" look to text. We don't read each letter, we recognize words really fast by it's shape. Some of letters are above baseline(i,k,l), some of them ...


5

No, it isn't necessary and some apps doesn't have a window title, but... Imagine a multi-window app: how would you guess which document you're editing? (look at the Finder: if it will miss the title, you probably will loose the context, which is very important in some cases). Imagine several different but looking almost similar apps, how would you ...


5

This suggestion is almost embarrassing, but have you considered using: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Keep it simple and users will know what to do.


5

Disclaimer: without more info as to what this is regarding, it's hard to say for sure. The following is based on gut feel. "I have a car..." feels more appropriate when it's contrasted with other sections, like "I have a motorcycle..." or "I have a bus...", perhaps with a top heading of "What kind of vehicle do you own?" That makes it easy to find the ...


5

I don't see anything wrong with using a partial sentence ending in an ellipses as a user prompt if the answer you're asking the user to input is a natural ending to the sentence fragment in your label. As you currently have it, the prompt and answers don't make a proper sentence: I have a car... blue Toyota Compare that with: My car is a... blue ...


4

First of all, you should always have a navbar in each of your views, so you need to ask yourself what you are trying to achieve by not having the text there. The iOS philosophy is that the navbar should indicate where you are in the app. Most of the time this is accomplished by a title, but there are some cases where it can be accomplished without on. ...


4

So, I've evaluated the answers and tried the option with the icon instead of the word and the result (as in: all the titles suit in there) would work fine now. But I'm still concerned about the familiarity of the icon and if it's appropriate even. What do you think? Remember that the button is used every time the user uses the app.


3

All caps is generally not in fashion in designs these days, except in some logotypes. There are arguments that can be made from a readability standpoint, but I think the reasons to avoid them on the Internet are as much cultural as they are technical. First of all, computer systems that could only display capital letters existed for a while and so today ...


3

If there's the possibility of very long titles I would have them left aligned and not in a title bar (to allow line breaks). Update: Just checked amazon.com and they do it exactly like that: Hope that helps.


3

The CTA "Add post" is in itself a sentence. The word post is (I'm assuming) not a product name but rather a word like any other word in a sentence and should be treated as such. Using the Title Case should be limited to writing titles, for CTA's (Call To Action) (<-Look, Title Case), you should use Sentence case because that lowers the cognitive load of ...


3

The label in a button is considered a caption. Thus, style guides have it these need to be capitalised. Oddly, a few style guides recommend the use of Sentence case rather than Caption Case for captions. See this answer for more.


2

Why not use ellipsis to ask the user? When you end the sentence with an ellipsis, it looks like part of the sentence is missing. Ellipsis is mostly used to show the user the sentence is cut of. Here is an example of a question were the ellipsis is correctly used: Best aesthetically solution to overflowing data in a table


2

I would not left align the title. The proximity of the back arrow with the title in this case gives the appearance that the arrow and title are grouped as one action and clicking either would take you back to the page referred to in the title. Shorten the page title if possible, and if not, reduce the font size. You should also consider using a tint color ...


2

UI's paradigm people use is windows/desktop paradigm for a long time now, so maybe not necessary but they will often look to a place where window title should be just to make sure are they on the right track. Also window title can contain additional and maybe important info like: what tab are you on (browser) what document are you on (word) what image ...


2

Our alphabet is designed with distinct shapes for recognition, even the capitals. Readability isn't an issue, this is a question of typography and aesthetics. In this case it is a cleaner look to avoid descenders due to the rule placed below the title. I would recommend using a single font-size for the titles though, the variance in height makes it look ...


2

Have you thought about Icons? Combine them with placeholder text to make it super easy for the user download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


2

Perhaps you could use Online Contact Online Contact Info [informal] Online Contact Information Online Addresses or, if space is a problem, just Online Info or even Online


2

Since this is a printed document not a form with inputs I see no need for a label at all. Something like: Dilbertsoft www.dilbert.com     dilbert@example.com Is perfectly clear. Email/website are easily recognizable from their form alone, and unlike postal addresses there's no need for clarification as to where the address goes. This ...


1

If you are filling in the information yourself and not expecting others to fill it in, like you stated I think that "Web Contact" would be sufficient: Web Contact: www.website.com , email@email.com A url and an email address both have a distinct enough format that people will know what they are.


1

I covered a very similar question to this recently regarding titles on links, below is a summary of the points, my focus was on accessibility of the title attribute. 1) There is some argument as to how to use the title attribute, especially for images and links. Below are some differing points of view: Nielsen says: The goal of the link title is to help ...


1

The benefits of using the title attribute would be improved accessibility (think screen reader software), as well as improving your keyword density and adding extra content for SEO. When done correctly they can also help usability by providing additional information, as was attempted with your sample website. There are javascript functions and jquery ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible