Tag Info

New answers tagged

4

This looks like the time selector introduced in Android KitKat; From a UX perspective this UI works well on touch-enabled interfaces but would be a lot less intuitive if used with keyboard/mouse. There is a useful overview of mobile time picker UI's here - http://blog.iangclifton.com/2014/01/22/mobile-time-pickers/ And also a nicer looking ( to me ...


1

I admire the effort of mimicking an analog(ue) clock face, but I think you're oversimplifying things into complexity. The first point of hopefully constructive criticism is, in full honesty, one of my pet peeves as a non-native English speaker; the AM/PM thing. If your target audience contains a significant amount of non-natives, you might consider showing ...


2

As your primary focus seems to be tracking working hours, you could easily assume that 8 hours are one day. E.g. the popular issue tracking tool JIRA does so: if someone logs e.g. 9 hours, 1d 1h will be displayed for easier readability. This way you wouldn't run into a problem as long as you don't want to track "real" (= 24h days) separately; and could get ...


1

The total estimate you are giving is a huge number of colors for the user to be able to recall and even distinguish to make any sensible overview of the data they are seeing. And I don't think that at any one time you will have more than, say, 20 colors in one graph in most use cases. And if you will, the graph will become illegible anyways, so what is the ...


1

The first problem is to show the course of a single day in a form the reader can easily grasp; the second is to relate your data series to this picture. Although "time of day" is a simple one-dimensional parameter, we associate a structure with it (workday, evening, lunchtime etc.) which can cause a certain dissonance when we see it plotted in linear form ...


1

Keep it simple, and as conventional as possible. Rectangular charts are the most common. Label the axes and pay attention to typography. Maybe use military time. Maybe emphasize (darken) the hour lines on the points of the clock (12, 3, 6, 9...). There's tons of existing charts of this nature out there, I'd spend some time exploring them to glean some ...


1

The question is rather vague and open ended because it depends on your product. However, generally speaking the customer experience lasts right from the moment they hear about your product until the last point at which they have any interaction with it. This includes: word of mouth research about product pre sales support the buying experience immediate ...


3

Anything from a fraction of a second to hours and hours of gaming. It all boils down to the scope of the application you're building. If your scope is to get the user to push a button to vote for something in an online Newspaper, then close to nothing. However, if your scope is like the Malmö/Sweden based King.com who published Candy Crush Saga - then your ...


0

Cynically I could answer "it depends how much they're paying for", the less flippant answer would be there is no exact timescale. The design and acceptance process would end when the stakeholders are happy that a design caters for their needs. Now, that said, experience dictates that you get used to the types of projects you get asked to do and can take an ...



Top 50 recent answers are included