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133

You are right to ask this question. It really depends on who your users are. In labor-intensive environments, users are often very familiar with the HH:MM notation for duration, so it's OK to use that format. But, I agree that even for those environments easy to get it confused with time. Is there a better way? Let's start with the existing solution. ...


47

I would argue the answer is neither. Firstly, your assumption that an analog and digital clock take up the same space is wrong. Analog clocks are circular, and fit a square, while digital clocks are more rectangular, unless you intend to have an unintuitive layout. Allowing a user to pick one or the other means having wasted negative space horizontally ...


39

It depends on what is more vital for users — «love to retrostyle» or effectiveness (speed of reading without mistakes). The following illustration from Handbook of Aviation Human Factors represents how effective are digital visualizations of altitude in comparison with classic analog gauges both for expert and novice users:


30

There is some interesting pedantic information on the weirdness of midnight: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midnight Specifically, technically, at midnight, it's neither am nor pm. But merely the instant of transition between the two. Some ideas: Use a 24 hour clock. Perhaps with 12 hour correlations in parenthesis: ... 10 11 12 13 (1pm) 14 (2pm) etc ...


24

There are many things you can do in such situation. Two obvious things that come to my mind: Provide some distracting animation (time goes faster when user is distracted, check the Foursquare's animation they've used in their iPhone app). Show some funny quote, interesting fact or tip that could be if not useful then just entertaining and appropriate in ...


23

The mental image of time is indeed thought to be influenced by language and culture. Scientists discovered years ago that spatial representations of time are affected greatly by linguistic conventions. If English is your native tongue, you're likely to think of time as moving from left to right, but if Arabic is your language of choice, time moves ...


23

A plus sign is sometimes prefixed to the time format indicate offset. It can also imply duration. For example: +4:00 +10:00 +4:00 +6:00 +0:00 +6:00


22

Because the simple system works. You set it when you go to bed, and if you don't want to be woken up the next day, just don't set it. More complicated ones with more features are available if you like, but the common ones do the job in the simplest most intuitive way. Good UX design.


22

This is a tricky interaction, mostly because it has to be super intuitive since the end users are not computer savy. I know it because I´ve had to deal with it in the past :) I had the same problem while working in the UX team at 11870.com (a recomendations website similar to Yelp), this is the way we handled it, might not be the ideal solution but it ...


21

I think it can better to make a visual support for such input, that will allow to enter not only breaks, but also days off. Input can look like this: Clicking on row or cell header (with hour or day) should turn on/off all days or hours. Also you can add popular variants at top of table to select them faster — «24x7», «All days without weekends» etc. ...


20

Nice. I like your idea of rewarding the good ones much more instead of blaming the bad ones. Don't know what type of company it is but finger pointing feels like from the old days and doesn't support a great work environment. For the 'Reporting time highscore' you might want to reward those who always report on time but also encourage everybody else to be ...


19

My initial idea is to use a slider where you can chose timestamps appropriate to the user. The further back in time, the more rough time steps you have in this logarithmic scale. It might not be appropriate everywhere, but it’s fast and intuitive: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


19

Another possibility would be to add a "prime" mark at the end, as is sometimes (often in race times) used. Minutes and seconds would look like 4′33″, so a single prime is minutes, so use 1:30′ for an hour and a half.


17

You can use some cues for hours and days. As those are more rare, the icons don't create much visual noise.


16

You can also show the minutes with a smaller font. On stopwatches, this is done for the seconds or milliseconds. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


14

Right align Yes, it is reasonable to right align in your case. For other date and time formats, the alignment can be discussed. Example from Spotify: The biggest number can vary in number of figures -- in your case the hour, in this example the minute -- but the smallest cannot. So right alignment is a simple way to a keep a consistent scale along the ...


14

You could use decimals. So for example: 90 minutes would be 1.5 hours instead of 1:30 3 hours and 45 minutes would be 3.75 instead of 3:45 This format is highly scannable and makes it easier to sum the values in your head.


13

In short, no. It will not help "to get rid of late time reports". High scores will NOT motivate anybody at tail of highscore list - they "know" there is no chance to get on top. And if someone wanted to change it, the "price" of better score is not worth the price they get for being late (it means the punishment is too low). Maybe the reason for being at ...


13

The international standard ISO 8601 would suggest P04:00 or P4H. Its part on periods, durations or time spans and repetitions, though, is hardly ever followed – and you aren’t using its date format in the first place. JFTR Please note that 4h00 is not unambiguous, since some people tend to write clock times that way. 4h00m or 4h00min would be better. ...


10

Gamification is way better than a wall of shame. Research shows that that punishment does not really work for changing behaviour while encouragement does(See for example "Thinking Fast and Slow" by Kahneman). While the idea of gamification is probably effective(Looking at for example fitocrazy) Tt would probably be more effective trying to address the root ...


10

There's a few studies that show sub-conscious reactions to the aesthetics of a page are made within 50ms, and that these reactions then impinge on the user's sense of usability, satisfaction, and the credibility of the site. Attention web designers: You have 50 milliseconds to make a good first impression! (PDF), Lindgaard G., Fernandes G. J., Dudek C. ...


10

Your first solution is the classic one. The most of the timelines on the web are made with this solution. Just google "timeline" and take a look to the pictures. But you said, you only have a small area to use your timeline, so this could be tightly. I would use a version, where you have the line at the bottom of the page and just show up the events upwards. ...


9

Preloaders are the best things. There are many kind of preloaders and it helps to let understand users that something is loading and nothing crashed. Then you can think to entertain users showing a funny or creative preloader. Take a look here. Are flash based but you can do that using other technologies like jQuery.


9

We got a page like that in a server admin interface. You can unfortunately not download a demo of it (as it is the server admin interface) but it looks kind of like this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups One of those bars each for every day of the week. And then a set of presets like "Always", "Never", "Working ...


9

"Preferred" doesn't mean that 100% of your audience will be comfortable with it. Give the user the choice to change it, that way, everybody is happy. Using 24h format also decreases ambiguity on time, specially if the clock in your website will be used to make appointments or to handle a schedule.


9

Look at how times are shown in other stopwatch applications as an indication, as they have been refined over years. The typical way that it is shown is simply as HH:MM:SS. If you're only looking for time to an accuracy of seconds and you want more than just numbers, then something like 2h 23m 12s seems clear enough without taking up lots of space. You ...


9

I think the best way for users to input data is through a form - Everyone knows how to use them, and you can easily split lots of data into small, manageable chunks. Here's my solution: This gives them enough control that they can input anything they need, but doesn't overwhelm them with a barrage of questions. Clicking on "This schedule only applies to ...


9

It may depend on how the time is used. If it is needed for accuracy, then digital is a better choice. It is possible to get an accurate read from a digital display without having to look at and interpret the hour hand, minute hand, and second hand (all separately). If, however, the clock is used to show a quick estimation of time, analog might be ...


8

This paper [1] provide a survey on whishes of users regarding progress bars and alternative activities. 47% of the participants mentioned staying idle for short waiting period (<5s), while 37% of the participants reported switching to a temporary activity. However, 65% answered that they switch to other activities for longer wait (> 15 s). ...


8

Thought about this a while back for a restaurant related website and Sacha's newsletter problem resurfaced this for me. There are many many different types of opening hours that restaurants can have, so the solution has to be flexible enough to encompass the different variants, yet simple enough that it's not intimidating for restauranteurs (who may not be ...



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