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36

I came up with another way to handle this scenario which is more clear in cases with arbitrary jumps. 1. Show links below the text input to quickly convey how the bidding system works by listing valid choices which can be chosen with a single click right from the start. 2. Update valid choices as the user types or clicks The user can either type 68 or ...


28

I recently was playing around with a new type of pager control that only uses numbers and doesn't require any localization (next, previous, last, first, all function without any words required in the UI) I modified it slightly to work in your case here. The idea is to be really clear to the user up front that they can't just type anything they want because ...


22

Ariel is on the right track. Uppercase letters are generally much more distinguishable from each other. L won't get mixed up with 1 or the lower case l, as Ariel mentioned. If you look around, you can find a mixture of upper and lowercase, but from the user perspective, typing in a mixture can be cumbersome. So to make it more user friendly, keep it in one ...


10

Jumping in with an answer because I've seen a really nice example of this in the wild. Hargreaves Lansdown is a UK financial institution, and here's how they do it: The idea of giving context to a user hadn't occurred to me before I saw this. In practice, I find it far faster and easier to input a password when I can see how far the requested characters ...


9

If any service can validate what the n-th character of your password is, it means that they are storing your password in an insecure format. No service should ever know what your password is, they should only be able to say whether your password authenticates or not. So you shouldn't ever ask for the n-th character of a password, and you shouldn't ever be ...


8

HSBC uses a combination of a username, password, and security key. In this implementation, you first enter your username. Next, you are prompted to enter your password and three random characters from your security key: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups The benefit of this approach is that the password does ...


7

You could just have one input field that handles city, state, or post code as is pretty common with these things.


6

In HTML5, the input element supports the step attribute. Example: http://jsfiddle.net/yhffroa1/ However, not all browsers support it yet. IE in particular doesn't have spinner buttons for <input type="number">, and mobile browsers don't respect step at all. There is also the pattern attribute that applies the :valid/:invalid pseudoclasses as ...


5

What you are describing is a Combobox and has been in use for as long as I can think about GUIs. The concept has gained new momentum in the web with the further development of dynamic elements and web apps – most notably google's search box with it's suggestions-as-you-type. Chrome's "Omnibar" is, basically, the same thing: It's a text field you can type in ...


5

You should ask for the entire password, not just because it is more secure, but because users entire passwords by muscle memory, especially passwords made up of arbitrary characters, or defined by movements across the keyboard. This makes it hard for users to recall characters in specific positions.


5

Several reasons come to mind: Indication of spelling: Usually, lowercase letters and mixed-case words are used for actual, existing words. When, in text, you mention a single letter, you generally write it in uppercase (which helps distinguish the indefinite article "a" from the letter "A" - though "I" in English is still a problem here). So this tells ...


5

Why are the textboxes without boxes? It is an interesting principal of material design and choice. The reason google went without the box was because it's analogical to writing on ruled paper. Material is all about having one constant "material" for your page so boxes would be constituted a different element and a different material. Another reason is ...


5

I personally am a fan of what Windows has been doing lately with numeric inputs: When you enter something invalid, it shows a "tooltip" type popup that tells you of the error. Obviously, the message for your control would be something akin to "The bid must be a multiple of 20€"


4

forcing focus to search could have negative usability implications towards screen readers and other accessibility tools. I would suggest against it - the only caveat being if a user navigates to the page from another link which is explicitly designed to "take the user to the search page" (like an "advanced search" link - assuming you can not provide the ...


4

I would like to add to the above some technical reasons: In a form that has multiple fields, the page may for whatever reason load a bit later than when the user started to interact with fields, so when the page finally loads, you force cursor on search field while the user is typing in another field, you can imagine how frustrating that is, especially in ...


4

To make sure users only select and don't enter anything, you would need to remove entry form, because it's encouraging people to enter things into it. Alternatively, I would set current bid as default and only let users choose from values like "$445 (+$15), $460 (+$30), etc". set current bid as a default and give user a list of options from +$10 (or ...


4

How about a design like this? download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups You allow the user to enter any number he wants into the "ideal bid" textbox, but automatically display in the disabled "actual bid" textbox the nearest increment (rounding down so as not to make the user pay more than he intended).


3

I don't have something I would consider to be a "valid" answer, but I'd like to blame the letter L - in lowercase form, it could be an I, an L, or the number 1. edited to add: On the UX side - my mind wants to make this a more valid answer, so I'm going to add that the real underlying intent (potential) could be that codes are a serious pain as it is. To ...


3

While your form (the long one) is simple to understand and straightforward to use, it has a couple of problems: The amount of questions and the length of the form feel overwhelming. Have you measured how long it takes an actual user to fill out the form completely? The textboxes are large, and suggest by design that you expect long elaborate answers. The ...


3

The user should not be forced to enter a postcode. There are valid cases for wanting to find a nearby store but not knowing the postcode. For example: I'll be honest and admit that I can never recall the postcode for my office, even though I've been working there for 3 years. If I have to give my office postcode, I have to look at my business card. ...


2

I can't say I know of any research into this, but for me this would be a no go. It just isn't intuitive enough for the user. Perhaps a better solution would be to present the user with a drop-down in the first instance, if then the user cannot select an appropriate option, reveal an input field giving the user the ability to manually enter the relevant ...


2

I think a good way of dealing with this is to add a round close icon found on many search inputs. This indicates that not only is the text editable but can be cleared if they choose not to use it.


2

In my experience, the easiest to use have had (or would have): State dropdown A field for post-code or suburb name, which figures out one from the other A cookie or similar to remember the last entered info (if it's something people are actually likely to use repeatedly) Some kind of IP-based geo-location to guess the info in the absence of said cookie ...


2

Whether or not you need to be able to cancel an action (edit or insert) is dependent on the consequences of the action. Does adding or editing an item have immediate consequences for the user (i.e., is business logic executed, etc.)? If not, it may be OK to leave out the cancellation option - the user can always delete the item, change the value, or go ...


2

Accordion is one way of doing it, but in general having that many fields will have users turn around and leave. You likely want to avoid as many of those textareas and have users answer them each as required. The other way is to have them fill in one at a time with a "next" button and an indicator of how many are left. Adding the possibility to skip or ...


2

If you are not space constrained, allow user to enter whatever value they wish and then round it to the nearest allowed value. The reason this needs space is that you will need to not only show the actual allowed value, but show an explanation of what is going on. Something like: Your bid To prevent arbitrary bids with small increases prolonging auctions ...


2

Rather than completely focus on input widget, in addition to widget an in process correction UI would be very strong. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


1

We need to look at the use case and environment. A few examples: ATM machine uses sound and asterisk/dot to provide feedback. This is pretty much everywhere. Normal web form for most desktop environment uses asterisk/dot. Here, the user is assumed to have good and stable control of he keyboard and knows what they are typing. Wifi password prompt in ...


1

This is an interesting search related article: 7 things I wish every search box did. Especially number 2 is of use in this case. I'll quote it: SEARCH ACROSS MULTIPLE ATTRIBUTES When looking for something, such as a contact, users will often only remember pieces of information, such as this person’s first name, the company they work for, where they ...


1

If I understand correctly, they have to enter the digits one by one from left to right. This is bad interaction design for the following reasons: It violates the principle of least surprise. Users see a text boxe, they expect it to behave like a textbox. The conventions may not be ideal, but you have to take them into account. There's a lot of work between ...



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