New answers tagged

2

Both answers here are great, however I'd like to add if you're considering Usability, consider to weigh the factor of Colour Blindness as well. There's a great chrome app called Daltonize: http://www.daltonize.org/2010/05/chrome-daltonize-color-accessibility-in_13.html It's also quite useful to test contrast levels.


1

I agree with the other points here. Contrast is very important. You can review a guide for Web Fonts to review or learn more about how to create a strong typographical design in this medium. One thing designers forget is to make their website usable and accessible to all people. If you lack contrast, your font may to lost or submerged. You can always check ...


8

While the final color combination will depend on the UI design, branding specs and other considerations, the keyword is CONTRAST. and as such, you're on the right path, black on white is the maximum contrast you may look for. However, there's another consideration to keep: eye strain. Undoubtly, staring at a pure white screen for a long period of time will ...


0

You have two options: 1. Avoid lengthy text Is it really necessary to have long text, do people need it to make the choice/selection? Long text can also be overwhelming and difficult to scan. In my experience there is a good chance that an alternative way of presenting options will come up after a brainstorm session. Give it a try! 2. Accept that it's ...


1

I wouldn't use rollover tooltips or additional buttons in the dropdown as user will be confused about the action. I would propose : A) Adjust the width of the dropdown to the max length of the items or even breakdown the item after some width and show each item as a bloc : B )If the content is very distinctive, cut the end of the text and use three dot (....


0

If you only have a few options but they're all very long, then maybe a select box isn't the way to go. It could become very annoying for the user to have to click to expand, or hover over, the text for several options just to be sure they are choosing the right one. You could use a custom styled radio button group instead and implement a button to expand a ...


0

Machine-readable content does not necessarily have to have any impact on the visual representation for humans. Potential solutions for you particular case include hCalendar Microformating and Dates, Times and Durations Microdata These are both written into the code rather than in the visual representation. This means they also work for RTL, East-Asian and ...


0

On hover will not work on mobile devices so scrap that. You could try the ellipsis to show that content has been omitted but not deleted. Item One ... You could try a + symbol to indicate there is more Item One + Click on either symbol to trigger extra menu items verticaly.


0

Its not obvious whether a hover action is what one needs to view the full contents of that particular line of text. You could use the trusty [+] sign at the end of the visible part of that line of text.


0

This is comes down to expectation management. Expecting: If you choose to go to a section that is clearly a specific login page the auto-focus will feel conveniant, removing a redundant step. Not Expecting: If you are unknowingly being redirected (for example: please login first before continuing) it will feel forced and possibly even unreliable / shady. ...


0

Except is definitely the right word here. I would also italicize Everything, and leave out the comma: Everything except ad-free. That has more punch, and draws more attention to Everything. All that said, I would seriously consider some form of Swapnil's suggestion.


1

"Except" would be clearer and more grammatically correct: 'ad free' is the exception to 'everything'. Very straightforward. A reasonable interpretation of "everything without ad-free" could be "every one of these things is without ad-free", i.e. "each of these things has ads". Which is not exactly what you mean -- it's close enough that it wouldn't be ...


3

Instead of using confusing Grammar prepositions such as Except/ Without, make it clear to the user of what's in the package and what's not. Replace it with clearer terms: REMOVE ADS or CONTAINS ADS. It makes sense since you're developing on Android and Play Store already uses these terms. Also, as per hierarchy, your PREMIUM package should always be ...


0

Text is important, because for some users who would be using your project would get confused with only icons, this would lead to a Bad User Experience. But then again if your Project already has too many data to be shown(on each pages) then adding extra texts just for icons may cluster your screen with too many things, so in my opinion, If the contents on ...


3

Normally my advice would be to always pair an icon with text on the screen, making both clickable. In this way you can use an aria-hidden attribute to hide the icon for screen readers, which just leaves the text link for audio screen readers. However, if it is not possible to do this, then you have to consider that someone cannot see the screen because they ...


-1

Text is an important part of UI development for AA. So the best choice would be including text.



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