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It's a pull quote You're asking about pull quotes. Wikipedia explains its main purposes: A pull quote (also known as a lift-out pull quote) is a key phrase, quotation, or excerpt that has been pulled from an article and used as a graphic element, serving to entice readers into the article or to highlight a key topic. (Emphasis added.) So the answer to ...


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Consider yourself lucky to get such a challenge! I had a stint of time when I was designing mainframe applications - it was quite a shock to have to go from graphics to text-based interfaces, but it forces you as a designer to really focus on the core aspects of design. A few things I've found useful in CLIs: Easy way to access help for commands, ...


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Depends, depends, depends... First off, a question: what are your users familiar with? People raised on DOS might have been used to quite different UIs than the ones used to OS/400 or Bloomberg console. Each TUI has its own design paradigms. IBM developed a standard called Common User Access, which might help you. (BTW, purely from a visual perspective, ...


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Does it need to be CLI only? Most of the time, a CLI is best implemented as a power-user feature of a more learnable GUI application. That eases the learning curve for the command-line phobic (a pretty large user base), and those seeking extra awesomeness can speed up what they've learned about your app by activating the CLI. A few precedents we can learn ...


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I do not really think it matters if you capitalize your placeholder words or not. If you want to be consistent I would suggest going with: Search Restaurants, Cuisines, Dishes Also as far as proper wording check out Yelp, which is heavily search based, does not necessarily honor any consistency, as their search placeholders embodies all different ...


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Perhaps the most notable example of a feed where the newest items are at the bottom is forums. Although not a "feed" in the very strictest sense of the word, forums wouldn't work any other way. In my experience, whenever context demands that you have read the older stuff first (like forums), then the new content is always at the bottom. On the other hand, ...


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Blogs are typically ordered new-on-top, aren't they? I use Feedly to read lots of feeds, and it gives me the option to sort newest-first or oldest-first. My choice depends on the content, but usually I read oldest first. Some things (e.g., comics) should be read old to new. Other feeds (e.g., Metafilter) I get behind on, so I want to clear the old before ...


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In one line, The user must see the most important content first, hence remove the need for scrolling for them. Which means: When a user is viewing messages/ news or any items which may be dependent upon time, the newest things must be seen first. But if the same list of messages contains information about tasks to be completed within given time, ...


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I couldn't find any research on best practices, (and when I tried to google for one, I've got all sorts of UX bibliographies ;-), Here is how some online libraries are dealing with it: From what you have described, and from my experience of dealing with the related text media, I would do something like this: Note that some info in the tooltip is ...


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There's no significant UX research on this but as a general rule, reference and citation style largely depends on the subject matter and the publishing body. Let me give you a few examples here: Harvard Referencing - Author-date or Author-Title or Author page enclosed in parentheses. The (Author-date) style is recommended by American Chemical Society and ...


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I see there being two obvious solutions here: 1) You can just wrap it so it'll go to the next line (not very pretty probably) 2) Have a tooltip that show the full title on hover (this is done common enough that your user may expect this to happen).


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Sounds like you need to sketch this out with pencil and paper, or paper cutouts, or whiteboard. As far as images being place left/right/center - we can't say one is better than another. It depends many factors and I suspect aesthetics might be the driving one. Note that the location of the images will be harder to change later on, while all the spacing and ...


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In the same way that having an empty line between chunks of thoughts (i.e. paragraphs) serves as a visual marker which makes reading and scanning easier, a double space after a full stop / period serves as an improved visual marker for the end of a sentence. I can't recall the source, but I read a study a few years ago on just this point which found the ...



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