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12

Disabling selectable text is horrible UX for non-native speakers of the language the text is written in, who may rely on copy-and-paste to automated translation software or website to make sense of the text. This is becoming less of an issue with ubiquitous smartphones with high-quality cameras and OCR translation apps, but I believe it's still relevant.


1

Generally, there are two reasons: Clarity It's odd to have the text of a button or dropdown selectable. It'd be confusing for my cursor to turn to a beam, as if the primary interaction I will have is selecting/editing the text that is there. You could have an arrow cursor and still have it selectable, but that's weird too. Polish Selectable text is the ...


32

It's a myth that selectable text is "costless" As a general principle you are right that text should be selectable. That said, since you're asking about non-selectable text, here are some cases to be aware of for disabling text selection. There are visual elements containing text that users don't expect to be selectable. For example: Let's walk through ...


0

I can suggest at least three cases where underlining would be appropriate: The purpose of the underlined text is to indicate something that was "filled into a blank", either literally or figuratively. Neither italics nor bold face conveys this. Additionally, while line endings can be problematic, underlining offers the ability to distinguish between two ...


0

One other case I have hit that is at least tolerable--a form that's asking you the same thing twice to reduce the human error factor. It's quite understandable that they might keep you from copying the text from one field to the other. What gets obnoxious is when they block pasting--what if you are copying the information from a saved location?


32

There is a reason when disabling the selection of text makes sense, and that is if selection of text could interfere with functional aspects of the UI. For example, it is frequently used on widgets that are draggable because you want to avoid that the user accidentally selects text when he intends to drag.


50

I believe the usual justification is to prevent folks from copying and pasting the content so that they don't steal it. I usually roll my eyes at this because if a user really wants that text, you can get it one way or another, even with selection disabled. I came across another example: a developer wanted to disable selection because double-clicking a ...


7

The simple answer to this question is NEVER. Restricting the ability to select text won't keep competitors from stealing your content but it will make it virtually impossible for customers to easily share it.


0

any number that is numeric in nature and a computation is done on it (like a total) then it should ALWAYS be right aligned ALONG WITH its heading. So other numeric number that are just numbers like units, some procedure code, date, etc should be left aligned ALONG WITH its heading.


5

Traditionally, throughout journalism school students are taught to write with the inverted pyramid style rather than taught on how to write for the web. There are multimedia or convergence degrees out there that try and bridge this gap but they're relatively new. The inverted pyramid gives a high level introduction of the topic in the first paragraph or ...


2

Reuters articles are probably written to serve both print and web and they don't have a rewrite-for-web process in place. CNN's markup strikes me as dated in many respects (note it's XHTML, not HMTL5 - not that there's anything wrong with that), possibly an artifact of an older CMS or other technology. Many of these outlets still publish in print and/or ...


1

It's likely an unintentional artifact of the platform both sites use: WordPress. People who wrote/formatted the articles aren't UX, SEO or accessibility experts. The WordPress WYSIWYG editor is terrible when it comes to adding headings to text. The dropdown you need to switch from paragraphs to headings is hidden within the so call "kitchen sink" row. ...



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