Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

59

Designers When it's your working version and you just want some text in there to visualise the overall page balance, and you'll only share it with other designers, then using Lorum ipsum should probably be fine. End users For end users, I would suggest using some other real example text. Yes, you'd have to localise this, but it's quite easy to simply ...


51

I believe the usual justification is to prevent folks from copying and pasting the content so that they don't steal it. I usually roll my eyes at this because if a user really wants that text, you can get it one way or another, even with selection disabled. I came across another example: a developer wanted to disable selection because double-clicking a ...


38

It's a myth that selectable text is "costless" As a general principle you are right that text should be selectable. That said, since you're asking about non-selectable text, here are some cases to be aware of for disabling text selection. There are visual elements containing text that users don't expect to be selectable. For example: Let's walk through ...


32

There is a reason when disabling the selection of text makes sense, and that is if selection of text could interfere with functional aspects of the UI. For example, it is frequently used on widgets that are draggable because you want to avoid that the user accidentally selects text when he intends to drag.


30

Font and layout is exactly what Lorem Ipsum is designed to do. It has been used by type setters and printers since the 1500s. The idea is that by not having real words the users focus on the layout. It is a long established fact that a reader will be distracted by the readable content of a page when looking at its layout. The point of using Lorem Ipsum is ...


19

Apart from the answer given, I would like to mention one very important Use Case where the solution is nothing BUT shadows. Text on an image When you don't have control over the image on top of which you are writing text, you have to ensure proper contrast for best readability. A Big hero Image seems to be rage these days. A dark shadow is added behind ...


17

Based on UX.Movement: Why Text in All Caps is Hard for Users to Read The reason of the worse readability of uppercase vs lowercase is the lower contrast of shape. Small caps still has worse contrast of shape than lower case, so it'll still be less readable. There is also some relationship with familiarity, taking into account that for sure more of the ...


16

It might be a good idea to provide the percentage as additional information if applicable, and display the absolute changes instead, e.g. +9 (900%) but then leave it out if not applicable +10 This way a user recognises that there was a change and also gets an impression on how much has changed relative to the previous number.


12

In some situations a drop shadow or stroke can be used to maximise accessibility and maintain the contrast ratio between text and the background. I have used this method once or twice when dealing with strict brand guidelines that demanded non-conforming colour combinations. It is mentioned as a technique for meeting the SC 1.4.3 (Contrast) criterion of ...


12

If the goal is to provide a short text sample for the style then use a pangram like "A quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog". This will show how each letter is rendered.


12

Assuming you have a context where this level of accuracy matters (e.g. an academic or technical audience, or a delicate topic) it's always best to just clearly and simply state what's going on. This 7% have a gender (male, female, or something else). For some, you know it, for some you don't. In all cases, you're not reporting it. So just say that: Not ...


12

Disabling selectable text is horrible UX for non-native speakers of the language the text is written in, who may rely on copy-and-paste to automated translation software or website to make sense of the text. This is becoming less of an issue with ubiquitous smartphones with high-quality cameras and OCR translation apps, but I believe it's still relevant.


11

If you don't want to leave off the percentage, then what you show depends on your data. If your data constantly fluctuates between 0 and 1 or similar small numbers, showing the increase as 1,000% is misleading. In the same way, values that are often in the millions with a sudden 0 value only showing a 100% decrease may not be helpful. Mathematically, no ...


11

To me, the answer is yes, especially for dark themed sites. Here are some images from a site that I designed for my brother's roofing company. He wanted an all dark theme. So I gave him a dark gray background, some off white and gray body texts, all with darker CSS3 shadows. ( Small caveat: the images actually came out darker than the site actually is when ...


9

It seems that "Unknown" is true to the situation. Go with that. You could always explain, as you did on this site, why gender is unknown.


8

There are two theories/explanations for why text in All Caps is harder to read. One says that it's because of the less unique word shapes, and the other says that it's because it's less common. Small Caps suffers from both these problems - it has a generic word shape and it's even less common than All Caps. So whichever of the "all caps" theories may be ...


7

If the text preferences are important, you should not use example text in a different (which includes fictive) language. Languages have different characteristics, and what looks fine for a paragraph of "Lorem ipsum …" is not necessarily ideal for text in other languages. So you should show text in the language the user is setting the preferences for. You ...


7

Choose a text generator that suits your domain and use it instead. Lorem ain't good for layout/typography, it was never meant to (see other answers for why it's not, unless you are in a real printing business, Gutenberg&co-style). If you're after font/typography, use a pangram for the language you are after (hello localization!), like @ratchetfreak said ...


7

Traditionally, throughout journalism school students are taught to write with the inverted pyramid style rather than taught on how to write for the web. There are multimedia or convergence degrees out there that try and bridge this gap but they're relatively new. The inverted pyramid gives a high level introduction of the topic in the first paragraph or ...


6

A simple and conventional way would be the ellipsis. CSS even has the property text-overflow which has ellipsis as an option. http://davidwalsh.name/css-ellipsis http://css-tricks.com/snippets/css/truncate-string-with-ellipsis/ Example My short string My longer string that will get cut ... My other much longer string tha... Working Example on UX ...


6

The simple answer to this question is NEVER. Restricting the ability to select text won't keep competitors from stealing your content but it will make it virtually impossible for customers to easily share it.


5

Darkhorse Analytics has one of the easiest to understand explanations for improving tables The points relevant to alignment of table data are: Left align text (where appropriate) Right align numbers (where appropriate) Align titles with data Resize columns to data


5

Here is another option that might work depending on the situation. It has the added benefit of not needing to be localized into different languages... credit: Facebook placeholder loading card


5

The usual third option is Other, which would encompass a variety of options including but not limited to: those who did not fall in to the Male/Female box; those that explicitly would rather not say; those who implicitly did not say; those where the data is not known, etc, etc. And then if you feel the need to explain what 'other' actually entails, make it ...


4

I would probably try using an analogy like alphabetic fridge magnets vs. a photograph of said fridge magnets to define a real world situation which mimics the difference. They could look at a fridge with a word spelled on it and a photo of that fridge and the concept of being able to interact with the text on one and not the other may become clearer. If you ...


4

n/a seems to fit well, and it is a known convention. n/a or N/A is a common abbreviation in tables and lists for not applicable, not available or no answer.


4

Due to the dropdown requirement, it seems like a flat (or horizontal) tree would have many advantages. If text is angled off a radial tree the drop down would either be angle-aligned with the text node (hence also angled) or not angled (and not aligned with the associated text node). Either case is highly unconventional. Is there a strong case for a ...


3

This is more a matter of taste & design than usability. Both 1 and 2 indicate that there is some text hidden. Option 3 doesn't always do that, it just depends on the length of the field and the input. So in terms of usability, I'd scratch that one if I were you. Now, comparing red pill vs blue pill. With the red pill you can still see (and select) the ...


3

Interesting question. I think you can have a look at the paper "Letter case and text legibility in normal and low vision". In the abstract you can read: Using a single unaltered font and all upper-, all lower-, and mixed-case text, we assessed size thresholds for words and random strings, and reading speeds for text with normal and visually impaired ...


3

I would argue that the most accurate word besides menu would be "navigation". Shortening it to nav might be alienating for a less tech-literate audience. But stay aware of innovating for the sake of innovation."Menu" is a metaphor that is pretty well-established and has taken years for users to internalize. On one hand I think it is important to stay ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible