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268

If you are developing a Windows application, the correct term to use is "Exit". This is spelt out in Microsoft's Design apps for the Windows desktop guide, under the "Standard Menu Bars" section. If you are developing a Mac application, the correct term to use is "Quit". (Your menu item must read "Quit AppName".) This is spelt out in Apple's OS X Human ...


56

The Terms The following table summarises the conventional terms, which are platform dependent. On Windows, you run an application, then exit it. Ditto for Unix command line tools. However, both old documentation and pretty much all windows 8 documentation uses Open/Close. On a Mac (which deep inside is Unix-based) you open an application, but then quit ...


22

Ariel is on the right track. Uppercase letters are generally much more distinguishable from each other. L won't get mixed up with 1 or the lower case l, as Ariel mentioned. If you look around, you can find a mixture of upper and lowercase, but from the user perspective, typing in a mixture can be cumbersome. So to make it more user friendly, keep it in one ...


18

Exit I don't know if your user base is international but I guess it is of varying levels of English and varying levels of IT skills. Exit is universal for leave, quit and go away (remember not everyone thinks like us geeks!) Take these users: The grandma who has just got her first laptop I want this to go away ... quit [negative connotations, implies it ...


16

It might be a good idea to provide the percentage as additional information if applicable, and display the absolute changes instead, e.g. +9 (900%) but then leave it out if not applicable +10 This way a user recognises that there was a change and also gets an impression on how much has changed relative to the previous number.


15

To create connection between image and description use the proximity principle from the set of Gestalt principles, giving less space to connect the elements and more space between chunks of information to separate. This gives good results both for above or below description placement. To support information consumption flow, exploiting human's percertion, ...


11

I think the following micro-changes could improve your current design. Remove gray frame around the icon. Vertical lines of the frame "activate" the Gestalt principle of continuity and limit the space for text inderneath the icon, see red lines on the picture. Use the whole word to describe an icon when possible. I'm not native English speaker, and Con is ...


11

If you don't want to leave off the percentage, then what you show depends on your data. If your data constantly fluctuates between 0 and 1 or similar small numbers, showing the increase as 1,000% is misleading. In the same way, values that are often in the millions with a sudden 0 value only showing a 100% decrease may not be helpful. Mathematically, no ...


9

There is actually research about this topic: http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/fulltext.cfm?uri=oe-6-4-81&id=63459 "Both text contrast and background contrast variation affect text readability. Background variation effects were only seen when the text contrast was low. Greater effects of background variation would be expected if larger background ...


8

Man, when you asked that question, I thought you meant a Web 1.x monstrosity. I'm not sure there's a hard and fast rule on this but, generally speaking, that's what we would call light noise. My concern wouldn't be with the level of contrast, but with looking somewhat dated. Basically, as soon as Apple declared skeuomorphism to be a thing of 2012 and thus ...


7

Proximity principle should be the first consideration. After that, it could also depend on the medium of usage. Blogs, newspapers and books for example almost always have the title below the image. This probably has to do with the fact that the images are meant to provide supporting material to the overall content of the piece. So you might read through a ...


6

Try putting the number over the icon and the text below the icon:


6

A simple and conventional way would be the ellipsis. CSS even has the property text-overflow which has ellipsis as an option. http://davidwalsh.name/css-ellipsis http://css-tricks.com/snippets/css/truncate-string-with-ellipsis/ Example My short string My longer string that will get cut ... My other much longer string tha... Working Example on UX ...


5

Check out https://www.spotify.com/uk/video-splash/ Spotify accomplishes text/button overlay on a video background pretty well. You could add a drop shadow via CSS to your overlay. Do you have any control over video selection? Take note of the types of videos the spotify splash uses. Note that some videos are very specific about the aperature used to shoot ...


5

Since nobody has mentioned it: Depending on your application you might have need for two terms. For example in chrome I can close the whole window, but I can also close just a tab. Same with Photoshop, my code editor, and a bunch of other UIs. Having the same term for two different things is confusing (imagine if there was just one word for open and close). ...


5

Several reasons come to mind: Indication of spelling: Usually, lowercase letters and mixed-case words are used for actual, existing words. When, in text, you mention a single letter, you generally write it in uppercase (which helps distinguish the indefinite article "a" from the letter "A" - though "I" in English is still a problem here). So this tells ...


4

I will agree with Anindya on the aspect that keeping the prominence on the descriptions will make it useful since a user is more likely to know what is the "Capacity" instead of what is "32gb". When it comes to selecting the mode of prominence I would prefer using a subtle color to highlight as compared to using a "Bold" face. Something like As you see ...


4

I would probably try using an analogy like alphabetic fridge magnets vs. a photograph of said fridge magnets to define a real world situation which mimics the difference. They could look at a fridge with a word spelled on it and a photo of that fridge and the concept of being able to interact with the text on one and not the other may become clearer. If you ...


3

Not only is it Subjective, but it is also contextual... For instance if your interface is information for say doctors, more technical and long winded scientific information requires longer paragraphs. However for marketing, you want to catch the attention, call out, and compel a response from the reader in a relatively short format. The best references I ...


3

The standard solution is to have the foreign text on a float which covers a small part of the viewport, e.g. white text on a black rectangle. You can make it look better if you choose a text color which is by itself likely to have high contrast from most other colors (your current white is great here) and give it a very fine border from a color which will ...


3

Darkhorse Analytics has one of the easiest to understand explanations for improving tables The points relevant to alignment of table data are: Left align text (where appropriate) Right align numbers (where appropriate) Align titles with data Resize columns to data


3

I don't have something I would consider to be a "valid" answer, but I'd like to blame the letter L - in lowercase form, it could be an I, an L, or the number 1. edited to add: On the UX side - my mind wants to make this a more valid answer, so I'm going to add that the real underlying intent (potential) could be that codes are a serious pain as it is. To ...


3

I would argue that the most accurate word besides menu would be "navigation". Shortening it to nav might be alienating for a less tech-literate audience. But stay aware of innovating for the sake of innovation."Menu" is a metaphor that is pretty well-established and has taken years for users to internalize. On one hand I think it is important to stay ...


3

No. Any alteration in the regular text is going to emphasize it. Even if you reduce the size of the font, it is going to grab the user's attention because it is just different. I am not convinced that the use of italics here is to deemphasize. When you look at "Yesterday at 2:00:00 PM - Today at 1:00:00 PM" - that doesn't tell you the duration. It tells you ...


3

Interesting question. I think you can have a look at the paper "Letter case and text legibility in normal and low vision". In the abstract you can read: Using a single unaltered font and all upper-, all lower-, and mixed-case text, we assessed size thresholds for words and random strings, and reading speeds for text with normal and visually impaired ...


2

There are number of good guides around image text and number layout from Apple, Android and Microsoft user experience guides. There are also some very thorough full ideas from the User Experience Magazine. I'm not sure of UX context but here are some ideas that will need to be adjusted based on how much space your allowed to use in your application. This ...


2

Check out the coloring used here: http://www.seattlecidercompany.com/, they manipulated the coloring so that white text would look good across it. Your video is very clear and draws attention to both the wording and the video at the same time. You might want to consider either playing with the color (like the link above) or playing with the clarity like ...


2

There is no strict rule on this. I've encountered both ways of placing descriptions. You just have to ensure that there is enough spacing between different images and that description is closer to image it describes: [image1] Description1 ...enough empty space or even some delimiter line here ------------------------------ [image2] Description2 ... ...


2

I don't know that this would fit the motif you are going for, but a semi transparent band across the screen that the text sits in would make the most sense to me. Something like this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups With this approach, the area where the text lies, you will be able to guarantee that the text will ...


2

In my opinion, the 'Quit' action sounds more forceful, so it can be used to close an application which has failed to load or complete an action. It suggests the user wants the application to stop immediately. (For example, "Force Quit" on Mac OSX.) In contrast, the 'Exit' action sounds more gentle, so it can be used to stop an application after it has fully ...



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