Hot answers tagged

59

Designers When it's your working version and you just want some text in there to visualise the overall page balance, and you'll only share it with other designers, then using Lorum ipsum should probably be fine. End users For end users, I would suggest using some other real example text. Yes, you'd have to localise this, but it's quite easy to simply ...


52

I believe the usual justification is to prevent folks from copying and pasting the content so that they don't steal it. I usually roll my eyes at this because if a user really wants that text, you can get it one way or another, even with selection disabled. I came across another example: a developer wanted to disable selection because double-clicking a ...


48

There is a better solution, at least in terms of legibility, perhaps not so much aesthetically. And I'm 99% sure you've already seen it. Black border, white letters. White letters are almost always brighter than the background, and the black outlines act as a sort of shadow, separating the text from the background. Of course, the best legibility is ...


42

It's a myth that selectable text is "costless" As a general principle you are right that text should be selectable. That said, since you're asking about non-selectable text, here are some cases to be aware of for disabling text selection. There are visual elements containing text that users don't expect to be selectable. For example: Let's walk through ...


32

There is a reason when disabling the selection of text makes sense, and that is if selection of text could interfere with functional aspects of the UI. For example, it is frequently used on widgets that are draggable because you want to avoid that the user accidentally selects text when he intends to drag.


30

Font and layout is exactly what Lorem Ipsum is designed to do. It has been used by type setters and printers since the 1500s. The idea is that by not having real words the users focus on the layout. It is a long established fact that a reader will be distracted by the readable content of a page when looking at its layout. The point of using Lorem Ipsum is ...


18

Assuming you have a context where this level of accuracy matters (e.g. an academic or technical audience, or a delicate topic) it's always best to just clearly and simply state what's going on. This 7% have a gender (male, female, or something else). For some, you know it, for some you don't. In all cases, you're not reporting it. So just say that: Not ...


13

Disabling selectable text is horrible UX for non-native speakers of the language the text is written in, who may rely on copy-and-paste to automated translation software or website to make sense of the text. This is becoming less of an issue with ubiquitous smartphones with high-quality cameras and OCR translation apps, but I believe it's still relevant.


13

Years ago I worked at a sign shop doing vinyl lettering. White. Black might get hard to read as shadows cast (including walking by the door). Unless the background is light enough to guarantee, I think white is your best option.


12

If the goal is to provide a short text sample for the style then use a pangram like "A quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog". This will show how each letter is rendered.


12

Highlighting is more relative than absolute Non-designers often don't realize that the style of highlighting is much less important than the relationship between the highlights and non-highlights. There are all kinds of approaches to creating highlights. One might use font-color, background-color, size, font variation (e.g. italics, underlining) and ...


10

It seems that "Unknown" is true to the situation. Go with that. You could always explain, as you did on this site, why gender is unknown.


9

It's much more usable to have text accompanying icons. The paradox of icons is they have to be universally recognizable enough that they could appear without text, but they never should appear without text. Also with the Like text, the clickable size of the icon is larger, ie it's more accessible. Your chosen icon to represent a Like action is poor, to be ...


8

It's a pull quote You're asking about pull quotes. Wikipedia explains its main purposes: A pull quote (also known as a lift-out pull quote) is a key phrase, quotation, or excerpt that has been pulled from an article and used as a graphic element, serving to entice readers into the article or to highlight a key topic. (Emphasis added.) So the answer to ...


8

Guidelines say... Particularly about books there is a related question in this community: It's recommended to start new chapters on the recto page of a manuscript, as it establishes a predictable flow for the reader to follow. The resulting occasional blank pages are actually a part of establishing this rhythm, making the divisions between ...


7

If the text preferences are important, you should not use example text in a different (which includes fictive) language. Languages have different characteristics, and what looks fine for a paragraph of "Lorem ipsum …" is not necessarily ideal for text in other languages. So you should show text in the language the user is setting the preferences for. You ...


7

Choose a text generator that suits your domain and use it instead. Lorem ain't good for layout/typography, it was never meant to (see other answers for why it's not, unless you are in a real printing business, Gutenberg&co-style). If you're after font/typography, use a pangram for the language you are after (hello localization!), like @ratchetfreak said ...


7

Traditionally, throughout journalism school students are taught to write with the inverted pyramid style rather than taught on how to write for the web. There are multimedia or convergence degrees out there that try and bridge this gap but they're relatively new. The inverted pyramid gives a high level introduction of the topic in the first paragraph or ...


6

The simple answer to this question is NEVER. Restricting the ability to select text won't keep competitors from stealing your content but it will make it virtually impossible for customers to easily share it.


6

Reviews are a very tricky case because if people see you altering user reviews, it may come off as you censoring the reviews. If someone writes an all caps review because they are yelling about bad service, it may look like you changed the case so it doesn't look as bad. I think there are only three ways to go about this: Try to avoid the all caps on the ...


5

The usual third option is Other, which would encompass a variety of options including but not limited to: those who did not fall in to the Male/Female box; those that explicitly would rather not say; those who implicitly did not say; those where the data is not known, etc, etc. And then if you feel the need to explain what 'other' actually entails, make it ...


5

Here is another option that might work depending on the situation. It has the added benefit of not needing to be localized into different languages... credit: Facebook placeholder loading card


5

First and foremost; highlighting text should be used sparsely. Otherwise it gets to be noise making it hard for the user to get what you’re trying to communicate. Christian Holst who wrote the article Scannability: How to Highlight Text on the Web says 10% highlighting is the maximum, but I think that’s pushing the limit. Here “less is more” applies. ...


5

I would wrap the text, which means you'd sometimes have more than one line of text, and the height of your column header will need to be flexible. In terms of readability, having a few 1-line headers with extra space above and below in order to accommodate the space for a couple of 2-line headers is better than having text that changes size from column to ...


5

There's no one-size-fits-all answer. The answer might depend on the reflectiveness of the door, how dark the room behind it is, and even the position of the lights. To determine what's appropriate for your environment, try the following quick experiment. Take a picture of the door from roughly where someone might stand to read the sign. Blur the picture a ...


4

n/a seems to fit well, and it is a known convention. n/a or N/A is a common abbreviation in tables and lists for not applicable, not available or no answer.


4

Due to the dropdown requirement, it seems like a flat (or horizontal) tree would have many advantages. If text is angled off a radial tree the drop down would either be angle-aligned with the text node (hence also angled) or not angled (and not aligned with the associated text node). Either case is highly unconventional. Is there a strong case for a ...


4

The correct approach in English would be: 0 followers 1 follower 2+ followers


4

Can open. Worms everywhere. There is no canonical answer here as its still openly and vigorously debated. The Wikipedia page on the topic is very well written and has links to research (tl;dr: It's inconclusive). My own view on this from a UX perspective is: It's a design decision, more than a usage/dogma decision. For digital interfaces ...


4

What devices are you targeting? You may just need to employ responsive table practices. As your screen shrinks, you may want to consider removing less important columns, or transforming your table into one of the following: Stacking - View at 400px or less Cards - View at 400px or less Priority/Optional Columns - Example by "Tablesaw" However, if you're ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible