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266

If you are developing a Windows application, the correct term to use is "Exit". This is spelt out in Microsoft's Design apps for the Windows desktop guide, under the "Standard Menu Bars" section. If you are developing a Mac application, the correct term to use is "Quit". (Your menu item must read "Quit AppName".) This is spelt out in Apple's OS X Human ...


55

The Terms The following table summarises the conventional terms, which are platform dependent. On Windows, you run an application, then exit it. Ditto for Unix command line tools. However, both old documentation and pretty much all windows 8 documentation uses Open/Close. On a Mac (which deep inside is Unix-based) you open an application, but then quit ...


45

I would not disturb the text editing area. You never know where the user is editing, so let her use her time in the box as she likes. Instead I would make it clear at all times how much time is left, and show that the submission will automatically be carried out when the time is out, by blinking the button when the time is running out. In the mockup below ...


24

You could just fade the text as a function of extra-time, Fade = F(extra_time), so at some time the text would just dissapeared. It is not forcing and not punishing for user. At the same time it is a soft indicator for other users of using the extra-time for this text. This feature could be used for engaging users and giving them a badges of "black", "gray" ...


21

Ariel is on the right track. Uppercase letters are generally much more distinguishable from each other. L won't get mixed up with 1 or the lower case l, as Ariel mentioned. If you look around, you can find a mixture of upper and lowercase, but from the user perspective, typing in a mixture can be cumbersome. So to make it more user friendly, keep it in one ...


18

As an extension to other answers, which describe good visual hints for writers: You could auto-submit the text in background when the time is up and indicate to the user that he/she is allowed to make minor changes, but all changes after the timeout will be marked. It's his/her decision when to finally submit. This way there is no hard limit. They may ...


18

Exit I don't know if your user base is international but I guess it is of varying levels of English and varying levels of IT skills. Exit is universal for leave, quit and go away (remember not everyone thinks like us geeks!) Take these users: The grandma who has just got her first laptop I want this to go away ... quit [negative connotations, implies it ...


17

Your assumption is correct, items ordered in a vertical list rather than a horizontal list or as a grid is a lot easier on the eyes to scan. The reason is quite straight forward, horizontal lists need to span a larger area and therefore the user has to move their focus larger distances which is tiring on the eyes. Same thing with grids, here the user has ...


14

To create connection between image and description use the proximity principle from the set of Gestalt principles, giving less space to connect the elements and more space between chunks of information to separate. This gives good results both for above or below description placement. To support information consumption flow, exploiting human's percertion, ...


14

It might be a good idea to provide the percentage as additional information if applicable, and display the absolute changes instead, e.g. +9 (900%) but then leave it out if not applicable +10 This way a user recognises that there was a change and also gets an impression on how much has changed relative to the previous number.


12

Punctuation is used to reveal the structure of written text. A period separates sentences in a paragraph. All style guides call for no punctuation in captions, titles, and headings, with the exception of question and exclamation marks. From The Oxford Guide to Style. 2002. Oxford: Oxford University Press: Do not use full point in headlines, column ...


11

I think the following micro-changes could improve your current design. Remove gray frame around the icon. Vertical lines of the frame "activate" the Gestalt principle of continuity and limit the space for text inderneath the icon, see red lines on the picture. Use the whole word to describe an icon when possible. I'm not native English speaker, and Con is ...


9

There is actually research about this topic: http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/fulltext.cfm?uri=oe-6-4-81&id=63459 "Both text contrast and background contrast variation affect text readability. Background variation effects were only seen when the text contrast was low. Greater effects of background variation would be expected if larger background ...


9

If you don't want to leave off the percentage, then what you show depends on your data. If your data constantly fluctuates between 0 and 1 or similar small numbers, showing the increase as 1,000% is misleading. In the same way, values that are often in the millions with a sudden 0 value only showing a 100% decrease may not be helpful. Mathematically, no ...


8

This reminds me of the technique used by school teachers in the classroom when it's time to move the lesson on: "Please finish what you're doing and put your pens down." Students have a little time to dash out a sentence or two but not cause the class to wait 20 minutes. Provide an extra minute (or two) of time, and limit the amount of extra characters your ...


8

Man, when you asked that question, I thought you meant a Web 1.x monstrosity. I'm not sure there's a hard and fast rule on this but, generally speaking, that's what we would call light noise. My concern wouldn't be with the level of contrast, but with looking somewhat dated. Basically, as soon as Apple declared skeuomorphism to be a thing of 2012 and thus ...


7

Yes, there are usability issues. If you do not include the address in a form usable by a screen-reader [eg alt text], how do sight-impaired internet users read it? Is the image of the address a link? Is it a mailto: link? In that case you have defeated your own object and restricted its use to those who have their browser set up with an email client. ...


7

Proximity principle should be the first consideration. After that, it could also depend on the medium of usage. Blogs, newspapers and books for example almost always have the title below the image. This probably has to do with the fact that the images are meant to provide supporting material to the overall content of the piece. So you might read through a ...


6

You could perhaps provide each user with "additional writing time" -- say 5 minutes a day maximum. If the user runs out of time, you can lock the field. The user can review what they have written and, if they notice any mistakes, can click "Use extra time" and use X minutes of their daily allowance. You could perhaps top up the allowance as the user ...


6

Try putting the number over the icon and the text below the icon:


5

The quick and easy improvements for increasing readability are: increase a little line height slightly darken text color


5

Check out https://www.spotify.com/uk/video-splash/ Spotify accomplishes text/button overlay on a video background pretty well. You could add a drop shadow via CSS to your overlay. Do you have any control over video selection? Take note of the types of videos the spotify splash uses. Note that some videos are very specific about the aperature used to shoot ...


5

Since nobody has mentioned it: Depending on your application you might have need for two terms. For example in chrome I can close the whole window, but I can also close just a tab. Same with Photoshop, my code editor, and a bunch of other UIs. Having the same term for two different things is confusing (imagine if there was just one word for open and close). ...


5

Several reasons come to mind: Indication of spelling: Usually, lowercase letters and mixed-case words are used for actual, existing words. When, in text, you mention a single letter, you generally write it in uppercase (which helps distinguish the indefinite article "a" from the letter "A" - though "I" in English is still a problem here). So this tells ...


4

I would go with DC. As a resident of the city that deals with these drop downs often, I am almost always looking for DC. District of Columbia is an okay choice, but DC is what it's called primarily and what most people probably look for. I wouldn't choose Washington, DC, if only for the reason that few drop downs seem to use this so residents probably ...


4

Note that it’s not like a formal exam where it’s important for fairness reasons that no-one gets more time. It’s just for fun and it wouldn’t be a problem if someone gets 1 minute more time. But then again, after this extra minute is over, I’d have the same problem if the user is still actively typing. To extend that, would it be a problem if ...


4

I will agree with Anindya on the aspect that keeping the prominence on the descriptions will make it useful since a user is more likely to know what is the "Capacity" instead of what is "32gb". When it comes to selecting the mode of prominence I would prefer using a subtle color to highlight as compared to using a "Bold" face. Something like As you see ...


3

My main concern in image instead of text is that some people need/wish to change the default font size in their web browsers. Your image wouldn't be a good company between larger or smaller texts, I guess.


3

There's two rules of thumb I follow when approaching this kind of thing. Titles never get a full-stop. Context decides the rest. What I mean to say is that messages that intend to alert a user to a change in status get no period - indicating there hasn't been a full-stop, and that there's still something to do. Leaving out a full-stop for things like ...


3

Not only is it Subjective, but it is also contextual... For instance if your interface is information for say doctors, more technical and long winded scientific information requires longer paragraphs. However for marketing, you want to catch the attention, call out, and compel a response from the reader in a relatively short format. The best references I ...



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