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16

It might be a good idea to provide the percentage as additional information if applicable, and display the absolute changes instead, e.g. +9 (900%) but then leave it out if not applicable +10 This way a user recognises that there was a change and also gets an impression on how much has changed relative to the previous number.


11

If you don't want to leave off the percentage, then what you show depends on your data. If your data constantly fluctuates between 0 and 1 or similar small numbers, showing the increase as 1,000% is misleading. In the same way, values that are often in the millions with a sudden 0 value only showing a 100% decrease may not be helpful. Mathematically, no ...


3

I would probably try using an analogy like alphabetic fridge magnets vs. a photograph of said fridge magnets to define a real world situation which mimics the difference. They could look at a fridge with a word spelled on it and a photo of that fridge and the concept of being able to interact with the text on one and not the other may become clearer. If you ...


2

Percent difference, in many scientific fields, is computed based on the following formula: (Amount final) - (Amount initial) %diff = ------------------------------------------- x 100% AverageOf(Amount final, Amount initial) (If Amount final is equal to Amount initial, then the percent difference should be given as 0. This needs ...


2

The question is a little odd, since it presumes two things about the Glass UX that aren't really true: It assumes there is a keyboard, or that users will frequently use a keyboard. This isn't true - most interaction with Glass is done using voice commands or, occasionally, by some very basic gestures on a touch pad. The entire UX surrounding Glass rests on ...


2

IMO it really depends on the context of your App/Site. Using the text which suits your context may becomes more intuitive for the user as well as he builds a frame of reference. I worked on a shopping App, They were specifically showing shopping categories in hamburger menu. For them its a great idea to use the text like below Many Shopping apps may ...


2

I would argue that the most accurate word besides menu would be "navigation". Shortening it to nav might be alienating for a less tech-literate audience. But stay aware of innovating for the sake of innovation."Menu" is a metaphor that is pretty well-established and has taken years for users to internalize. On one hand I think it is important to stay ...


1

There is several tricks. Split information to paragraphs with different level headers. Like you can see at wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Article_(grammar) Hide information and show the wide button [show more]. Don't forget about formatting. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Hide some paragraphs under ...


1

Adding to some approaches mentioned in @Pierre's answer. You could use some visual elements that hide portions of the information (text, in your case) and display the hidden portions instantly on demand (usually, following user's action, such mouse click). Such visual elements include, but are not limited to, tabs, expanding text panels and widgets (I'm sure ...


1

It actually all depends on the purpose of your site and of course of its users. If you take the example of a newspaper website, no one will argue that displaying a lot of text is bad practice. Such sites, however, have taken design steps to continually improve the experience for their users. One interesting idea is to take advantage of the "reader" feature ...


1

There is a demo of an keyboard app called Minuum (which is also available on Android phones) here: http://minuum.com/google-glass-keyboard/ You can see from the video that the input is from precise swipes on the side of Glass. However, without using it I have no direct experience of the UX.



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