Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

266

If you are developing a Windows application, the correct term to use is "Exit". This is spelt out in Microsoft's Design apps for the Windows desktop guide, under the "Standard Menu Bars" section. If you are developing a Mac application, the correct term to use is "Quit". (Your menu item must read "Quit AppName".) This is spelt out in Apple's OS X Human ...


55

The Terms The following table summarises the conventional terms, which are platform dependent. On Windows, you run an application, then exit it. Ditto for Unix command line tools. However, both old documentation and pretty much all windows 8 documentation uses Open/Close. On a Mac (which deep inside is Unix-based) you open an application, but then quit ...


45

I would not disturb the text editing area. You never know where the user is editing, so let her use her time in the box as she likes. Instead I would make it clear at all times how much time is left, and show that the submission will automatically be carried out when the time is out, by blinking the button when the time is running out. In the mockup below ...


42

I believe neither is “easier” to read in general, and I would instead try to make it a country-dependent setting that mimics the common book spine orientation, either in the visitor’s country or in the web site’s country. In Wikipedia’s book entry, the spine tilting section says the following: In the United States, the Commonwealth and in Scandinavia, ...


40

It depends on how you are using it. All caps can be the perfect choice when used correctly. The site you have referenced does look slightly odd to me, this could be because of the typeface itself. Certain typefaces such as Trajan Pro and Bebas consist of only all caps characters. These types of typefaces are usually used very successfully in headers and ...


35

UPPERCASE text is harder to read because the shapes of all the uppercase letters are all rectangular and users are not used to reading text that way. Therefore it is harder to scan, less efficient, and consequently a bad thing for readability. See also this article from UXMovement: Why Text in All Caps is Hard for Users to Read. And quoting from that ...


33

This is a good approach, however I would recommend putting the ellipses in the middle of the shortened string rather than at the end. It is commonly the last portion of the URL that distinguishes it from others, so by putting the ellipses in the middle you are not truncating the useful part of the URL. Example: ...


32

Short Answer Make them like tabs and follow that mental model (clockwise on right, counter-clockwise on left, upright on bottom). Medium Answer If your design uses tab-like elements, follow the logic of tabs. If it uses book-like elements, follow that model and pick a direction—if you're in the US, follow the orientation of book spines here (clockwise). And ...


31

Underlining non-link text is a sort of usability crime. Underline is a standard way of visualizing links, especially when the default blue isn't use for links, so underline can confuse web users as to what's a link. Even in desktop applications, underlined text often means "I'm clickable". Everyone knows that text that’s underlined, or is a different ...


25

Your example shows left-to-right languages, and its better to keep the rotation of the letters the same since we see words as shapes rather than reading letter by letter. That's probably why you see more feedback signs where the word is rotated 90 degrees rather than each letter: When we read - we read the shape the word gives us, which also answers the ...


24

You could just fade the text as a function of extra-time, Fade = F(extra_time), so at some time the text would just dissapeared. It is not forcing and not punishing for user. At the same time it is a soft indicator for other users of using the extra-time for this text. This feature could be used for engaging users and giving them a badges of "black", "gray" ...


23

For two main reasons,according to Microsoft posted 3 days ago: We’ve chosen to use uppercase styling in the top menu for two main reasons: 1) to keep Visual Studio consistent with the direction of other Microsoft user experiences, and 2) to provide added structure to the top menu bar area. On the first point, the use of uppercase text is becoming a ...


22

I hate to be this guy, but The W Blog has an article digesting some research suggesting that the presumed "letter shape" theory is incorrect on why CAPS LOCK is harder to read. It's a good article that cites real research you can delve into as deeply as you like, it suggests that the presumed reasons (letter shape ect.) for why UPPERCASE is hard to read are ...


22

I would answer no, the terminal punctuation should not be included in the hyperlink. It is the text that is being hyperlinked rather than the construct that the text is a part of. Consider other such constructs: in an unordered list you wouldn't include the bullet point in a hyperlink, in an ordered list you wouldn't include the number, and in a ...


21

I can think of a few reasons. It's a simpler mental model. You copy something and you paste it. You don't paste the result of some transformation of the object you copied, you get the exact same object you picked up. Simpler actions are better in that they are more predictable and less confusing. It's called "paste", it's not called "remove formatting and ...


21

Ariel is on the right track. Uppercase letters are generally much more distinguishable from each other. L won't get mixed up with 1 or the lower case l, as Ariel mentioned. If you look around, you can find a mixture of upper and lowercase, but from the user perspective, typing in a mixture can be cumbersome. So to make it more user friendly, keep it in one ...


20

There is a study on rotated text readability from University of Toronto. Although it is on tabletop displays, I think it can be applied here too. The result shows that it takes significantly less time to read clockwise (-90 degree rotated) for words in any positions of the screen. It is not clear for 6-digit number though.


20

Lets look at the logic that why icons are used the first place. Icons make use of our "scanning" ability which is quicker than "reading". If you put Text First then you are putting less efficient way to learn first and more efficient way later. Doesn't make sense. Steve Krug in his book "Don't make me think" almost killed himself advocating not to use ...


19

I'm not going to copy everything directly, so here's a link to a discussion on IxDA.com on this exact topic. It has references to several research studies showing why left-aligned text is better. You are essentially right — it takes more work to read centered text when going from line to line. You are also more likely to lose your place because you ...


19

Wikipedia is, I suppose, the ultimate in hyperlink use and has quite a strict linking style guideline for the ways in which URLs and hyperlinks are used within the text. Editors who don't conform to the style are quickly picked up - especially on more popular articles. I have to say it really does make for a pretty consistent reading experience from one ...


18

I think you're trying to solve a readability problem the wrong way. Line length (measure) is your real problem. The number generally advised for a readable measure is about 60-70 characters. Cut the measure to about 60% of it's current length and you'll find you have far less trouble. The other way to solve it is a bigger font size ... that would be really ...


18

As an extension to other answers, which describe good visual hints for writers: You could auto-submit the text in background when the time is up and indicate to the user that he/she is allowed to make minor changes, but all changes after the timeout will be marked. It's his/her decision when to finally submit. This way there is no hard limit. They may ...


18

Exit I don't know if your user base is international but I guess it is of varying levels of English and varying levels of IT skills. Exit is universal for leave, quit and go away (remember not everyone thinks like us geeks!) Take these users: The grandma who has just got her first laptop I want this to go away ... quit [negative connotations, implies it ...


17

Your assumption is correct, items ordered in a vertical list rather than a horizontal list or as a grid is a lot easier on the eyes to scan. The reason is quite straight forward, horizontal lists need to span a larger area and therefore the user has to move their focus larger distances which is tiring on the eyes. Same thing with grids, here the user has ...


16

It's called the letterpress effect. Here's an article with examples and tutorial and here's a video lesson.


16

It might be a good idea to provide the percentage as additional information if applicable, and display the absolute changes instead, e.g. +9 (900%) but then leave it out if not applicable +10 This way a user recognises that there was a change and also gets an impression on how much has changed relative to the previous number.


15

Caps are an effective way of introducing visual hierarchy without increasing point size or using bold. All-caps can make small text seem more important or conceptually higher in the hierarchy than larger text. Metro, being highly typographic, requires designers have a significant degree of freedom to express visual hierarchy without resorting to colour or ...


15

I believe it is in part because text in all-caps have a clear, regular rectangular shape to them regardless of the word or language, making them easier to position uniformly on any shape. That is, there are no descenders or ascenders to accommodate as there would be with lower-cased words (the position of which might vary depending on the word or language). ...


14

I would say it depends on the action of the button. When you are dealing with Calls to Action (CTA's) your primary emphasis is on communicating an action to an user as highlighted by this article about writing effective CTA's which has this to say : The very first piece of advice in the classic book Writing Tools encourages writers to start sentences ...


14

To create connection between image and description use the proximity principle from the set of Gestalt principles, giving less space to connect the elements and more space between chunks of information to separate. This gives good results both for above or below description placement. To support information consumption flow, exploiting human's percertion, ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible