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12

The stats seem to indicate yes, people trust anonymous reviews and testimonials. Some great stats about social commerce (which this sort of is) are at Power Reviews' Social Commerce Stats page. Eighty-three percent of online shoppers said they are interested in sharing information about their purchases with people they know, while 74 percent are ...


6

It's a common misconception that web site visitors read the text that they are presented with. Users scan text to find the part of the text or keyword they are actually looking for (if this page isn't their end result). So to find the right answer to your question, we need to turn our head to User Experience Experts Jakob Nielsen and Donald Norman and their ...


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This mainly regards corporate identity and should not affect usability very much - usually. However, I think you should not force people to write it with a star, as the ★ sign is extremely hard to enter for average user (in unicode it's 2605, so it needs pressing Alt+2605 according to this article). Instead, you should let them use "My Business" (or ...


2

This looks like an excellent opportunity for teaser text. When scanning down a page for relevant information, the keywords I would be looking for won't be in the solution to the problem presented by the testimonial. If I was having a teeth grinding problem, a testimonial about someone else experiencing the teeth grinding will grab my attention. Once you ...


2

The key word here is Business to Business meaning that both the buyer and the seller does this in their profession. From the buyers view, having Case Studies at the web site builds credability which is even more important than prize. As a buyer you are responsible and accountable for your actions, and you need to verify that your choise in vendor is correct. ...


2

It's about authenticity. If you want your testimonial to look like it was actually written by (or spoken by) the user, do not include the star. People don't write or speak company logos, they say the company's name. I would never say "Fed[arrow]Ex delivered my package on time." Or "I got a great price on shampoo at Wal[star]Mart." The time to enforce ...


1

Its not just website users. Look to any executive report, gap analysis, an analysts report on a policy decision, etc... You'll find a very simple pattern that makes a lot of sense... bullet points and summary, if the 20% Benny mentions catches the readers attention, they may be likely to read a little more of the details. This is a tricky concept to ...


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Most users will not read anything more than 2-3 lines and even then they will be looking for some specific keywords. If someone is really interested in buying what you want to sell then they can go farther than 3 line testimonial.


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Testimonials and case studies are inherently very different things, in that one is very subjective or emotive, and the other (should be) more objective. That should be a big part of why you choose one over the other. Lets say that it is a website about a music festival. Hearing testimonials of what other people thought of it and how they had an awesome ...



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