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0

Drill down means you show only one menu at a time. It brings you further down the menu structure. An example is the iPod menu: Or see this working example in jQuery. A hierarchical multi-level menu is more like a dropdown or accordion menu where the whole submenu structure is visible: Accordion example: Or as dropdown menu: An example in bootstrap


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User Goal is the Result that user wants to achieve. Use Case is the Scenario/way in which user is going to achieve that goal. Here is an example. You want to reach New York city. This is your User Goal. You book a flight ticket. Pay for it. Get on the plane. Transit. Reach destination. This is your Use Case. In short Use Case is series of related ...


1

Alistair Cockburn described the structure of a use case in his book Writing Effective Use Cases, e.g: As a [user] I want to perform [some task] to meet [some goal]. [user] can be a person or a system [some task] is the activity [some goal] is what you want to achieve A use case should be written in non-technical language. A use case may also contain ...


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In simple words, use case means the step that user will be carrying out to accomplish a certain task, i.e. the goal. User clicks on New button User clicks Select Files User clicks Upload button This is a use case to achieve a certain goal.


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A user goal describes what the user is trying to do, a use case describes how they do it. Goal: Buy a car Task Scenario: "You've decided to buy a new car for your family with a budget of £20,000." Use case (this is highly simplified): User clicks "Buy a car" navigation link They change the max price to £20,000 They filter out smaller cars and view ...


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This article on wikipedia actually does a good job of explaining Use Case. If you take the time to read it, you'll find there are a number of references to user goals and the examples and steps provided help to differentiate between the two.


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I work with a number of teams. The only term I've heard used with any frequency is ... "Visual QA" For the record, this isn't technically a UX thing. If your UX team also handles the final product design, then it falls in their court. But it's definitely something for the product / brand / visual design role to confirm.


0

I would simply go with Dashboard, Account Area, or User's Summary; words that more clearly explain what they are going to find there. 'Portal' sounds more technical to a normal layman and they might end up thinking that they will end up somewhere with lots of tools and widgets.


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Portal reflects the structure of the content (like for example "Blog"), which might not be enough information for users to make a decision on how to use the showcased content. Directness might work quite well. Have you thought about calling it "Dataset Summaries"? Just an example, but the idea is to name it exactly what it is so users don't have to figure ...


1

A little late to the party (2016)... Is there any reason to not just call it what it is - an "Overview" or "Summary"? Also, I realize that you were trying to name a specific page. I happened upon this question because I'm trying to find a name the whole system. Suggestions have been "portal", "customer login area", and a bunch of shrugs. :) I think ...


2

There isn't a formal UX terminology for what you are describing, although some people would call this a Design Review. Where this fits in the development process will depend on the development methodology. For example, if you are following any of the Agile development methodologies, you start each Sprint by showing the team what you want them to build ...


2

Sometime we call it "UX Review" and sometimes we call it a "Build Review" since we're reviewing both the styling of UI elements and UX functionality in a product's current build.


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All of your examples are verbs: sign, register, donate, be Regarding click-rates; any answer given will be results for a different user base. The only way to truly know what is more successful for your use case would be to do A/B testing with your users, and study the metrics/measures related to your site. Perhaps you could use general statistics if it ...


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Be a voter > Vote now Christopher Bryan and Gregory Walton (2011) conducted a study for understanding if using a noun or verb statement have an influence on user motivation. According to the results of their study, participants in noun group expressed significantly more interest, 62.5%, in registering vote than participants in the verb group, 38.9%. ...


2

Those are two sets of related but different concepts; mental/conceptual model, and framework/roadmap. The difference between a mental model and a conceptual model is described well in this article. Mental Model v Conceptual Model A mental model represents a person’s thought process for how something works (i.e., a person’s understanding of the ...


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Status Bar The name for the toolbar itself is the "status bar". Status Bar - a strip along the bottom of a software or Internet application that indicates what is happening with a task or information like date, time, cursor or scroll position, page number, open applications, etc. http://www.dictionary.com/browse/status-bar On a Web ...


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I (as business owner) usually use (when talking to developers) application "screen flow" or "screen structure". It not only depicts structure and hierarchy but also the "flow" when the user use the app.


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I think that the best is to call the context menu by its name. Not only this is the correct term, but it's also self-explanatory. Your documentation should make sure at the very beginning that the user knows how to make the context menu pop out (right click, double tap, etc.). If it's an in-app documentation, explain the way to do that in the current OS. If ...


2

In an online or in-app documentation, it is possible to detect the OS and to tailor the message for the right OS. Though it might be wise to display a manual switch of the target OS if a user might check the documentation on their mobile devices while actually working on a PC/Mac. For a default if OS-detection fails, my experience is that the ...


1

From a technical point of view the two are basically the same (i.e. excluding elements from a list, based on some criterias) From a user point of view, it's very different: Search is done as a first step to get some data Filtering is applied on top of the search, after the search, never before moreover, filtering is usually performed using boolean flags ...


1

There is always trouble when you start to let users design their own interface - whether they are experts or not. I'm guessing you already have a style in place for the UI that users are building (or a range of styles). If this is the case then you probably already have an idea of what primary (a "Save" button for instance), secondary (a "Cancel" button for ...


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I'd naturally describe A & B as "filled text button, with border" and "unfilled text button, with border", which would make C "unfilled text button, no border". If your application happens to be targeted at Android UI designers, Android has a very specific term for D: a "floating action button". Otherwise, "Circular" or "Circular iconic button" seems ...


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Ancient slash → new back-slash → disambiguating retronym forward slash Ancient Roman coins - Solidus and Denarius. The slash character came first, with a different formal name solidus. This name comes from Latin and was associated with coinage - hence (I guess) it's use in writing down prices in older currencies: 10/6 was quite a common notation for ...


3

If you are right handed, \ is annoying to write, while / is easier, which is why / became the separator symbol of choice in the days before computers and typewriters. It came to be called slash. In a UX sense, the canonical name is given to the more common variant, which is more common because it is more ergonomic. \ looks like the a slash that's backwards, ...


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I think in this case of a Forward Slash or Backslash, it is seen basically from the POV of: / = Forward Slash -> top pointing right, so "forward" \ = Backslash -> top pointing left, so "backward" I think it has to do with the western left-to- right reading custom as well as the human experience of gravity: If the Slash was a stick, a Forward Slash ...


2

The answer to this question is hidden in the mists of time, but I, your intrepid explorer, have braved the journey[1] and returned to supply you with the One True Etymology for "backslash". [1] I have not literally traveled back in time. It all starts with the shilling. You remember the shilling, if you were born before circa 1970. The British unit of ...


-1

It's simple, the 'slash' / came first. Then keyboards & computers came up with one that pointed the other direction. So, what to call it? BACKSLASH \ Computers used it and 'invented' it because they wanted a character that was NOT currently being used in normal language.


0

I know that with Dropbox, that sort of data is dealt with differently - as a DataStore instead of normal files you would expect a user to store within Dropbox. They have a tutorial which deals with getting the users permission and creating and dealing with their DataStore to sync data. https://www.dropbox.com/developers-v1/datastore/tutorial/ios


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The verb to slash comes from the Middle French esclachier and means to cut with a single sweeping motion. If you hold a knife or sword and slash something in front of you like a curtain or an enemy, and you are right handed like most people, the wound will be from top right to bottom left. Think of the middle part of the Z in Zorro. Back means the other ...


0

The primary idea behind a backup for app data is to be able to retrieve the data in another environment or another point in time. In such cases the user would prefer if this retrieval happens automatically without the user's intervention. Hence the onus is one the app which is promising to back the data up to ensure the retrieval happens easily. Given all ...


4

My mnemonic for recalling this is to visualize the slash as a person viewed from the side. The person would face forward in the direction of reading with the head at the top and feet at the bottom of the written line. A pipe | stands straight while a backslash \ leans back. Alternatively I (dimly) recall that a slash follows handwritten forward slanting, ...


0

Never heard of any such standards as there are multiple options available for where to store data. [root]/<appname>/<timestamp>/ Storing backup files in a folder with timestamp should be good enough. If you have multiple apps available then you can add one more level to backup path. [root]/<developer or ...


26

The reason you're confused is because you're using the wrong definition of "back". Or rather, the wrong reference frame to apply the word "back" to. You are apparently using the direction of writing, that is to say from left to right, to apply the word "back" to. But in terms of direction, the word "back" has two meaning: The opposite of "forward". ...


36

This character has many different names, and back slash is just the oposite of slash, nothing else. It was initially created to represent signs in ALGOL language that functioned as AND and OR operators Bob Bemer introduced the "\" character into ASCIIon September 18, 1961,as the result of character frequency studies. In particular the \ was ...


-2

Because backslash leans backwards. Also try thinking it as a person, that is facing in the direction that you are reading.


238

You have a stick, |, in your mind (AKA a pipe character). \ lean it back - will fall back = back slash / lean it forward - will fall front = forward slash Font features can be grouped as thickness, slant and width as in Google fonts. The natural way of writing is to lean forward which is named as slant. Slant is one of the synonyms of slash[2,3]. Here is ...


55

Because slashes (/) were around long before their backwards counterpart came along. EDIT Well, it was a nice theory, but according to Wikipedia: "The name "slash" is a recent development, first attested in American English c. 1961 ref "Bob Bemer introduced the "\" character into ASCII on September 18, 1961, as the result of character frequency studies." ...



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