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I don't think there would be a paper on this, but an obvious example to consider would be the client/customer and vendor situation. Some people argue that using the word customer reinforces a professional relationship and therefore reduces the appearance of 'friendliness', and hence sometimes the term client is used to put them at a higher status in a ...


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They are called context menus: A context menu (also called contextual, shortcut, and popup or pop-up menu) is a menu in a graphical user interface (GUI) that appears upon user interaction, such as a right-click mouse operation. A context menu offers a limited set of choices that are available in the current state, or context, of the operating system or ...


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'Right click menu' applied to desktop/laptop. Right click menu in latest IOS device called as 3D Touch menu. I do not know on android and Microsoft OS.


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Honestly, "Wantlist" sounds a little bit weird as I have never seen it around. "Wishlist" and "Favorites" are more common rather than "Wantlist". Other than that "Wantlist" or "Wishlist" are more used for the online stores where users can add goods to wishlists and buy those goods later. I`d stick with "Save to Favorites" or even would implement old good ...


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No Connection Established, Not linked yet, Not matched, Still Looking, Available


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When you can't think of a noun for an anchor or headline, think of a verb If you can't quite think of a name for the content on the linked page, you can instead try thinking of the action that users would do theres, just as the "registration page" may say "Register" or "Join." In this case, something like "Make connections" or "Expand your network"? ...


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Why not go with something more positive such as Available. That way it wont have any unwanted connotations and users may be more interested in requesting a connection.


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Assuming that you haven't already done so, it would be important to go back to the data and look at the information architecture to take time and document the structure and relationships between entities. This will form the basis for the 'what is' state of things at the, then you need to do the same for the 'to be' state of the future system and map the ...


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There's a lot of misunderstanding about what affordances are. The definition I've come to from study of Norman and Gibson is that they are properties of things.** They are not objects; a door is not an affordance. They are not actions; pushing is not an affordance. Affordances are properties: hollowness, heaviness, solidity, etc. We perceive these ...


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Affordances are what an object can do (truth). Perceived affordances are what one thinks an object can do (perception). Signifiers make affordances clearer (closing the gap between truth and perception). Signifiers often reduce number of possible interpretations and/or make intended way of using an object more explicit. A grey link on the screen might ...


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Affordance has to exist, it is an implicit property of an object. Let me cite Norman (who is citing James J Gibson): ...the actions possible by a specific agent on a specific environment. To Gibson, affordances did not have to be perceivable or even knowable -- they simply existed That's exactly the point, signifier without affordance is a mistake (a ...


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You know when the UI is shown whether the document is currently checked out or not, so name the tab for the action the user currently needs: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Your issues with naming of the tab go away, and the UX likely more closely represents the goals of your end users. (For simplicity of ...


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The study of Christopher Bryan and Gregory Walton mentioned in another answer is interesting but there is not a universal rule of which is the best. Sometimes you might want to show immediacy and use verbs. Some other times you might need to have nouns for things that are related to identity. The only thing that could help you here is empathy: Take a ...


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Naming things isn't necessarily useful for the user as they often don't care what somethings called, they just want things to work intuitively to get things done/solve problems etc. For the UX community however I'd say naming is vital and natural evolution of the discipline. Each named UI component or pattern is a simple word (or a few words) that ...


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I don't think we can have rules for terms of emerging concepts. I had never heard about "pinching", for example, nevertheless the name turned out (I think) to be a useful term when discussion touch interfaces. Without it, we would have a hard time describing how to interact to zoom a map. So acceptance and usage will indicate whether the term is useful ...


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As a programmer, I am always wanting to know more about what is going on inside of program compared to the average user, though I still don't want to feel overwhelmed. Consider this question: Who are my target users? Are they knowledgable computer programmers or are they old people that only know how to email & use their internet browser? The more ...


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Drill down means you show only one menu at a time. It brings you further down the menu structure. An example is the iPod menu: Or see this working example in jQuery. A hierarchical multi-level menu is more like a dropdown or accordion menu where the whole submenu structure is visible: Accordion example: Or as dropdown menu: An example in bootstrap



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