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0

Android have the following terms for each gesture: Source: http://developer.android.com/design/patterns/gestures.html I believe these are good terms as pinch can still be used as the overall term for the type of gesture, but then if you want specifics for which direction then open or close are good terms because they specifically refer to the opening or ...


1

IMHO, to a typical user, whether it's data or a dataset is mostly moot. As such, I'd simply say data. Query isn't strictly technical, so I think that'd be a fine term to use--especially if your users are data savvy. That said, a perfectly suitable alternative may be search.


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Grid comes to mind as something more intuitive to non-programmers. Apply filters to your grid I make this recommendation because it sounds like your query builder is not limited to a certain subset of data. If you had mentioned that this is restricted to something like pulling additional data about a client then I would go with a more direct Apply ...


0

There are very interesting and innovative answers being given, but I think you'd have to explain your requirement a little more so as to make the right decision. For example, Does everyone know how many people have bookmarked an item? Does the original poster know that he is not bookmarked / followed? What if that user is already bookmarked and you click ...


1

The list as you have shown is called List View or Table View. The method, which you have shown is inserting a new record to the existing view.


0

In typography, big starting letters dropping over a few lines are called "drop caps" (see http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/drop_cap). The idea is similar with small pictures featured at the beginning of an article. Since yours are zoomable, they could be called "zoomable drop pics".


5

I think this pattern can be called " List Entry View ". Full description can be found here, All list of patterns


0

In the context you require for showing appreciation ('liking') items in a feed, I think an icon based thumbsup/thumbsdown or heart/broken heart would work well... This way, users can simply rate or not rate a feed item without it be closely associated with another web app and overcomes the problem of finding the right term to fit in with your app that ...


1

Here is an attempt to give a summarized view of all the interesting perspectives that have been kindly shared here. People vs. content : When promising or offering anonymity, the focus can be put on the person ("You will be anonymous") or on the content ("Your posts will not reveal your identity"). This already makes a difference as the latter is less ...


0

Mosaic Interface Since "tiled" implies regularity, I'd call that a "mosaic" interface to include tiles of various sizes/orientations.


1

I've not specifically heard it used for UI but I think the word to describe it is "tesselated": Wikipedia article (includes many forms of tessellation/tiling) Google Image Search If someone said a UI was using "tesselated irregular tiles", I'd understand a Win8/Flickr photostream/Pinterest type layout.


2

If these things are strongly correlated in users' minds to geographic locations, then I would certainly try to work "location" or "point" into the name. If these are reports of incidents or conditions, and only weakly correlated to geography, you might call them "issues", "reports", "incidents", etc. All the examples you gave seem to fall more into the ...


0

Markers used by Google and pins by Apple, where it really are a pins. So if you're writing about iOS and OSX, use pins, otherwise markers.


1

What about calling them Points of interest? This is descriptive to your user, doesn't have a positive or negative connotation and is clear on what it means. Using markers or pins is a good way to describe the icon, but what you want to describe is the actual location. For this reason I would advise calling them:"points of interest", "locations" (as ...


2

"Markers" is probably the best technical term. "Pins" is probably the most common word in a non-technical, colloquial sense. I tend to agree with @Benny in the sense that you should use what is most familiar to your users - however I don't think that that vast of a majority of users call it a "pin" as opposed to "marker". But I'm just speculating, so go ...


0

Could you rename them to "locations" (or something similar), referring to the area that you are marking rather than the object that is doing the marking?


7

You are probably asking this because your into implementing it as a developer. The API of the most used map, Google Maps, call these needles for "markers". I'd guess this is the most technically correct word to use. Reference: Google Maps API Markers However I guess your target audience isn't developers and in there daily life call the needles "Pins". And ...


3

Vox Populi Literally, "the voice of the people." If someone wants to voice an opinion, but not speak as themselves, they are contributing to the metaphorical 'voice of the people.' You could label all such contributions this way.


2

You could just give them a positive sounding "cover" name. The specific choice would depend on your exact target audience, but I will give you an example of what I mean. Let's say you are implementing this feature on a learning website. You can allow your users to comment under the name "scholar" as opposed to their real identity. So the options would be ...


1

I use a word in day-to-day life "Me gusta". Though it is spanish but being a popular meme term I think any user can relate to this.


4

Changing the perspective can open other options. Taking the user's perspective and benefit as the primary lens, you can come up with words like : keep save collect These words tell you about the value for you as a user and change the focus that is often put onto the contents themselves which eventually get the benefit of the user's action (distinction, ...


1

Both Spotify and Firefox have something called a Private session. These days users are very much concerned about their privacy, therefor using the term private makes a lot of sense. Terms like icognito, hidden, secret, invisible, cloaked etc have a negative connotation. It's like the feature that allows you to do bad things without being caught by the ...


2

Definitely Hover. Or even better: "hover the mouse". Mouseover is not even a real word, it is a term used by software developers because that is how the event is called in certain programming environments. But an end user without software development background does not understand such a term. Hover is used in books. It is also used by Microsoft in its ...


4

How about using "userxxx" or "visitorxxx" where xxx = some number. Eg. user312 (something similar to what is used here at stack exchange) or visitor312 That way the user who is writing the comment need not reveal the identity and the owner of the post does not get the feeling that some random unnamed entity is commenting on his post. Here the presumption ...


3

It depends on how you are presenting the commenter's name (or not), and how verbose (or not) you want to be, but it could be as simple as: "One guest said:" "From a commenter on this site:" "An unknown visitor" What word would you use to describe the people on your site: Client? Customer? User? Guest? ... Could that word do the job?


3

I have used "Recommend" for forum posts in the past, and simply displaying the number of recommendations in a button next to each post. Rolling over the post adds "Recommendations: " in front of the button to explain it a little. It appears to work well - I appreciate not exactly the same use-case as yours, but you might like it.


6

This is very interesting and immediately reminds me of Pinterest. Pinterest has two different actions one called "Pin", which basically bookmarks that item, which most of us can assume that if you are pinning something then you also like it. However, Pinterest also has an option to like a pin. Why would you need the option to have both, when would you want ...


1

You forgot about "vote it up", I think. Sounds quite neutral and not facebookish. "upvote" probably goes too, but it is a bit stackexchangish ;-) tag and bookmark don't seem to be synonyms of like.


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Have you heard about reactions? You can see how Fastcompany.com is using it on some of their blogposts and the full documentation of it here: http://www.readrboard.com/. I've take a look at it and responding to your question, this technology allows your users or visitors to select the type of impression they have about what they are reading/viewing. I ...


14

You could pick one from thesaurus.com: I personally love the stealthy aspect of anonymous and would choose something like the following: incognito ninja


9

I think there are a couple that you could use that have good iconography: Pound It! or Fist Bump It! and (in my best Borat voice) High Five! Important Note: When you click the high five icon it should always play the corresponding sound!


26

What about Star? Google Reader did this and it was pretty clear it went into the Starred Items folder and your friends would also see you starred an item; it also served to bookmark. The other thing I was just thinking is that unless you told people, no matter what term you used it would still be unclear you "liked" that user. That seems totally different ...


3

What is the utility to 'liking' items, in respect to your product context & brand? Think of a verb that reinforces the brand: If you have an academic product, you might choose "cite" If it's a competitive scenario, choose "promote" These are just a couple simple examples


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"Like" is Facebook's creation and is strongly associated with Facebook. +1 is Google+'s creation and is totally associated with its brand. Thinking out of the box... It seems your functionality is not exactly the same as "liking". It's more "like & follow". There is no single word for that, so alternatively you could invent your own vocabulary. ...


3

Maybe you can come up with a phenomenon taken from the context of your app. Take Pinterest as an example, where you "pin" something on you pinboard. Is there some action in the real world that would reflect what you are trying to do? It is a bit hard to come up with something without the context of your app, but if we are to keep it a bit more general here ...


43

Personally I like love which is often represented by an icon of a heart and popular in social media. Then you dont have to write the word love but simply use the heart. But if you don't like the heart icon, you can always find a synonym from Thesaurus.com:


20

I think "Favourite" is the nicest commonly used internet term that encompasses the ideas of "like" and "bookmark".


1

I suggest "validate offer", which falls somewhere between emphasizing the authentication and the honoring aspects of the transaction, while simultaneously evoking both.


0

I would go with 'Redeem Offer' This might seem a bit strange because you would think of redeeming as what you do when you actually go to the vendor. However, if they are going to that effort, then they're pretty much dedicating themself to the whole process of redeeming the offer already. Also, in the world of (free) offers, people are most accustomed to ...


1

The sort of data usually found backing Business Intelligence is based on data used to carry out business. Basically the data only exists, because it was required to do business and likely was stored for this same reason. So Business Intelligence was born out of finding value from pre-existing data. The main issue with user experience data is the type of ...


1

User Experience is a lot about meeting the expectation of users. In terms of providing help and documentation the name of the document is crucial and should give users a very good idea what to expect. I think there is no general answer to this question. It seems that it's an established product with lots of users. The best way to find out is to ask your ...


1

I hadn't seen this before, but it seems that somebody mistakenly used what is being used as a progress bar indicating page load to indicate page progress. I think it started since iOS7, although I had seen it in other sites, where this pattern is exclusively used for page load, which I think is very slick modern and efficient. As others mentioned, this is ...


-1

I believe it's called a "scope bar" according to Apples HIG. I suppose it depends on the context in which it's used.


2

If the purpose is to serve as navigation header for your site, this is called Navigation Bar. http://getbootstrap.com/components/#navbar


1

If you have a specialist group of users and that's what they do then name the tab for them, not for you or for English speakers. Ie if they check out then check in the call the tab that. Remember the classic usability heuristic 'use language the user is familiar with'. Reflect what they do with your UI. Number 2 on this list 'Match between the system and ...



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