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I think a missing piece in the answers so far is constraint. Elegance is impossible without constraints. UX is all about designing a UI that accomplishes the desired functionality while meeting or beating all the constraints (effective use of screen real estate, minimizing mouse clicks, reducing the need for training or help files, etc.).


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It is subjective word... I think that people are using it when they want to say something is fine. What's fine? That's also a good question. Fine is highest of highest grade without exaggerating but keeping the real value of what is there... PS: I am writing this post while drinking a glass of fine wine or maybe not...


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For me, elegant design has the following qualities: It accomplishes its purpose in the simplest way possible. It's easy to use and doesn't cause frustration. It's aesthetically pleasing. It elicits the desired emotions. It doesn't do anything unnecessary.


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I'm very interested in this question and there are some good answers. However, could someone cite a website which they feel demonstrates these qualities. For example, to use a few staples....is facebook elegant? Is twitter elegant? Both are packed with functionality but in my opinion FB seems to me to be bloated. FB 2004, although much more primitive was ...


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To me, elegance is the combination of three features: Simplicity, coherence, and powerfulness. This can be applied to a design concept, aesthetic appearance, interaction design, and underlying code. Simplicity. Simplicity means few elements. It could be a concept that’s easy to explain in a few words, a visual design with few colors, lines, and shapes, an ...


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It is definitely subjective to a certain extent and perhaps the best way to understand it's intent is to ask for an example whenever someone mentions an elegant design. However, I think one can by default assume that elegant has the same connotations online as it does offline; as clean, minimal, and beautiful as possible.


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Elegant should mean slick design, polished to be simple and beautiful in one time. But as every word, that is connected to people perception, it is too subjective and personal, so it can mean different things for different clients and customers. So you just need to ask more questions, to understand, what does the word "elegant" mean in each specific case =)


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Elegant design is the visual equivalent of concise writing/speaking, in my mind. The aim is to convey as much as you can using as little as possible. Complete. Simplicity.


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In my opinion, in an 'elegant' design both the looks and interactions are visually pleasing, as is the user experience. Also, for it to be elegant, it should be clean, organised, feel spacious and shouldn't use too many colors/fonts. It should just feel like it's complete.


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From my own experience, an "elegant" design is a design that not only looks visually pleasing, but also has a very good user experience. Personally, I don't think a design is elegant enough without the user in mind. If a site isn't usable, then how can it be considered successful?


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I feel that the Advanced view is just more detailed of simple view in your case. So, I am not sure if "toggle" is the right type of frame used for this situation. I would rather see the current(simple) view titled what the page actually does. I am not sure exactly what the page title would be for you, but for the sake of this conversation: A user is looking ...


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I would consider: - Simple / Detailed - Overview / More Details Make sure that the current view is clearly indicated (underling, state selected) and that both are put one next to the other (almost like a tab view). Hope it helps.


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The ability to select tags and perform a search could simply be called: Tag based search. This is a form of faceted search (which you have already tagged in your post!) http://alistapart.com/article/design-patterns-faceted-navigation This opens up a bunch of other questions including: are the tags user defined? or are you working within a fixed taxonomy of ...


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Just for the record. My own inital functional approach: imgspread (demo)


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I associate "search" with a more open-ended query, almost always involving a text box input (though not necessarily keyword search). The process you're describing I think is more "filtering". I would use a filter icon (a funnel) as opposed to a search icon (magnifying glass). I also really like "Show Matching ...". Definitely not "Find", though, as that ...


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Maybe the button could say, "Show All," before any options are selected, (or if no options are selected, if that's a possibility.) Then when an option is changed, change the button label to say something like, "Show Matching Records." I think the, "Show Matching," label is appropriate in this case, because your users are trying to match the selected ...


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Search Disable (gray) the Search when the execute When they change an option or clear then Enable Search


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I haven't seen a compact name for the interaction. You see this very often on design portfolios. Here's two plugins Thumbnail grid with Expanding preview: http://tympanus.net/codrops/2013/03/19/thumbnail-grid-with-expanding-preview/ Portfolio content expander: http://codecanyon.net/item/colio-jquery-portfolio-content-expander-plugin/6507310


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Tom Wolf in his book The Right Stuff suggests that the Technospeak and the calm measured tone of the pilot has a psychological function for worried passengers. It's kind of suggesting Don't Worry; We are professionals and have LOTS OF TECHNOLOGY; So everything will be alright The medical profession tends to adopt the same approach.


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In this I think they should cater the majority I'm sure, most people want short layman info they can easily understand But the pilot could sneak in a short tech line just for fun and curious/interested people Some pilots actually do that already, but not much more techy than "We are know flying in a speed of 995kmph heading 10 degrees east for Lissabon" ...


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Best thing to do is a small survey for passengers if they really want more technical details. Most passengers would expect updates which can be understood for any lay man. More technical info is unnecessary I believe. 1) how technical should airline pilots be? As least as possible. 2) Should they only give basic essential information or should ...


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I am left-handed and do swap my mouse buttons (otherwise, how could I primary click with my index finger, as the mouse is clearly designed to be used), and I do find it confusing when instructions say right click/left click. I have to stop in my tracks and mentally reverse them, or think something like click/opposite click (come to think of it, not a bad ...


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Like others already said - go with "Search". It's a most common word pattern used in most interfaces since ages.


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I would highly recommend using the word "Search" as it is the convention most common on internet and desktop applications. In specific instances you may want to break the convention/expectation, but there should be a good reason. (For example, perhaps this is an application for a specific set of users like Librarians and the word "Search" is already strongly ...


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'Search' is universally associated with the functionality you've described above. When the user comes to the page, the button takes secondary importance as you need the user to do some filtering/ selections first. In this case, you can keep the button greyed out till all required selections have been made. 'Update results' would be a good choice if the ...


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Here are a few pre-digital references (courtesy of Google Books search) to the use of the phrase "user's experience", in reference to the domain of incorporating individual human experience as product design feedback: Reliance Motor advertisement, Electrical World, vol. 70, no. 14 (October 6, 1917): This is the new general service motor that represents ...


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The following is a quote from Brenda Laurel's chapter essay "Interface as Mimesis" (in User Centered Systems Design, eds. Norman & Draper, 1986, ch. 4, p.69). I've included enough context to show that the exact phrase "user experience" (emphasis added in quote) was used in specific reference to the domain of computer interface design: Likewise, an ...



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