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11

I would illustrate primarily visually, with text only as a safeguard for users who don't get the idea. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups If you have to use only words, I'd probably go for: One large tank Small tanks (with equal amounts in each) Small tanks (with all but the last filled up)


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Could this work ? Fill up one large tank Split it equally in X tanks Split it in X tanks with as many tanks full as possible


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The term wizard in and of itself I do not think is enough to describe what you are trying to do, however with the proper wordage it should do just fine. In my own experience I have seen this term used the most during the application installation process. For example Wizard Installation or Custom Installation


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No, not in isolation. But th is rather not how the term Wizard is commonly used. A real-world example would be a "Setup Wizard". This works especially well if the user wants to perform the task to which the adjective refers, but is looking for guidance. I.e. "I want to set up my printer, there's a Setup Wizard, I will need that." So, don't focus on ...


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Why not use the term assistant? That's simple, but if you can, you probably should avoid using any similar term at all. As some others mentioned, the term wizard might be confusing or have the wrong meaning in some other regions or cultures.


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Is the term ubiquitous enough these days that someone with limited software exposure would understand what it is intuitively? The term Wizard was most prevalent in the early Millenium, but even then mostly more advanced users will know what it is. Someone with limited tech exposure ("noob's with little to no experience beyond email and browsing") will ...


3

You can choose "tour" or "guide"


3

I think the term Wizard evokes the idea that you can take a "magical shortcut" to easily do something that should normally be difficult and / or time consuming. This is popular enough in western culture (I can't speak for other areas of the world) to be understandable.


2

I think looking at a couple of different relatively 'big' sites there's a few ways they approach it. I'm not sure the exact terminology is something to worry about too much, it's the way that the content/forms are presented. Look at FB and Twitter for example. The Facebook terminology is Log In / Sign Up and Twitter is Sign In / Sign Up, but they are both ...


3

Out of a related discussion which started on Quora, Geoff Alday dug a little deeper into the origins of the icon itself and discovered that Norm Cox is the man credited with designing the icon for the Xerox Star personal workstation, which was introduced in 1981. In an e-mail conversation between Cox and Alday, Cox reveals how the icon came about and the ...


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When users login for the first time, we suggest them to set a PIN, so this is not something they can miss. This is where I disagree with you. When users download a new app, they don’t want to fill in every field appropriately. They want to reach the app, test it and see if it’s worth the time to register. Because of that, your workflow needs ...


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If you do good job explaining what the code does and why you need to set it, the naming is of secondary importance. Also, aim for consistency: if you’re calling it “PIN” everywhere else, keep calling it “PIN” in your mobile app as well, even though iOS calls it “Passcode”


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The text in the screenshot says that the feature adds an extra layer of security, but it doesn't actually describe what the feature does / how it works. I think you need someting more specific like: When enabled, you will be asked to enter your PIN every time you access the application. This extra layer of security helps prevent your personal information ...


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Tiles, cards, widgets, gizmos, grids - the name does not matter. What matters is the functionality and principle. Be very careful of creating a interface method that forces all content and functionality into an overly consistent way of working. Consistency can make things look pretty and is vital, up to a point. The trick is to learn when what you are ...


2

The design is a rather eccentric amalgamation of design approaches. The idea that delivery of the content is somewhat similar to how Quartz does it. The site’s navigation is seem to be centered around the ever-present scrolling selection of stories in a left hand site on larger desktop screens or an expandable menu with a tap on smaller mobile screen. Like ...


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It's a 'hamburger menu'. It's not new, but not typically done on the desktop. It is a carry-over from the mobile world, where taking up initial screen real estate with a large menu was not desired, hence hiding it behind a menu icon. It's given that name due to the icon looking like a hamburger. I also like the term as it hearkens back to the concept of ...


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The concept of "clouds" where used in different sciences long before the concept of cloud computing existed. According to wikipedia: The expression cloud is commonly used in science to describe a large agglomeration of objects that visually appear from a distance as a cloud and describes any set of things whose details are not inspected further in ...



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