Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

264

If you are developing a Windows application, the correct term to use is "Exit". This is spelt out in Microsoft's Design apps for the Windows desktop guide, under the "Standard Menu Bars" section. If you are developing a Mac application, the correct term to use is "Quit". (Your menu item must read "Quit AppName".) This is spelt out in Apple's OS X Human ...


128

There is little need even to explain the idea of interface to users of the program. To them, the program is the interface. Don't say "the GUI of the program does X". Just say "the program does X". Don't say "the GUI has a red self-destruct button". Say "the program has a red self-destruct button". To you, the programmer, it is very important to think ...


88

It's called abstraction. Greatest achievement of mankind, I think. If we abstract things in our mind, we can use them with lesser cognitive efforts and integrate them better in our lifes and thinking-models. For example the Internet, it's not a real place: it's a bunch of tubes...I mean servers, to which we send requests, but it is easier to handle if we ...


72

"Sort by date" is probably the most common option, but it's not the way that most people speak. Where possible, I prefer speaking like a human (as opposed to an engineer), and so I would prefer using something like: Newest first or Oldest first


54

The Terms The following table summarises the conventional terms, which are platform dependent. On Windows, you run an application, then exit it. Ditto for Unix command line tools. However, both old documentation and pretty much all windows 8 documentation uses Open/Close. On a Mac (which deep inside is Unix-based) you open an application, but then quit ...


47

Following on Benny's answer, I would recommend trying to find the term that relates to the goal of the user (in some circles know as "business terms"). Perhaps by "Record" you mean "transaction", and by "Database" you mean "Transaction History" (just for example). Of course these terms are also technical, but they relate to the technicality of the realm of ...


43

I believe the going name for it is a Hamburger Menu, as a reference to the icon that's commonly used for it (, similar to the Unicode character ≡ U+2261 Identical To), and to the stacked nature of the drawer itself. Hamburger Drawer and Hamburger Sidebar would also be recognizable terms to the UX community. A bit of discussion on what I believe to be the ...


42

In short yes - unless you are dealing with a technical audience. Instead, refer to what is required in this case. If it's name, say 'Your name is required'. One useful bit of advice that all UX people should stick to is 'decode your language'. That means remove technical jargon and get rid of code names for projects and abbreviations. Many UX people coming ...


39

It should show "Joe Soap." Showing a pronoun instead of a name breaks up the flow of the list. It's possible that someone other than "me" will end up reading the list. For example, maybe it will be printed out and distributed to others. Using a pronoun draws attention to the software ("Look how clever I am, I recognize you!") rather than the user's goals. ...


35

Log in / out is more technical sounding than sign in / out. That said, I don't think there is any confusion with either one of them. The last time I looked at major sites using log v. sign it was a pretty even split between them. I would opt for sign in / out simply because it is more human speak. Regarding Join, Register and Sign up. They each have ...


35

The main difference is that Fluid Layouts (also called Liquid Layouts) are based on proportionally laying out your website so elements take up the same percent of space on different screen sizes, while Responsive Design uses CSS Media Queries to present different layouts based on screen sizes/type of screen. For some examples of both kinds of design, see ...


34

This quote is cute, often cited, and actually simply wrong. Even the nipple (as a feeding ‘device’) is learned – just ask some midwives and dry-nurses how many young mothers struggle with teaching(sic!) their newborns how to drink. Taking this into account, one should rather reconsider the concept of ‘intuitive’. See e.g. Glen's and Michael's answers.


34

If you feel like jumping the action (click/tap) you can directly say "Select" the ... Rather than a generic word, I would suggest you try to check what device the person is using and then say "click/tap" appropriate for the platform. But, then come the devices with both, a peripheral device and touch capability, which make this situation awkward-ish. You ...


31

In a desktop application, I associate "help" with a built-in or online documentation system, possibly containing a search function and/or a context sensitive guidance system. With "support" on the other hand I think of a call center, website, phone line or whatever, but always occupied by human beings that are paid by my license fee and who will listen to ...


28

UCD ∈ UX Put another way, user-centred design is a method (or process) to achieving good user experience. Here is an example UCD design flow using SAP (note arrows indicating a process): Source: SAP Design Guild


26

A Toast is a non modal, unobtrusive window element used to display brief, auto-expiring windows of information to a user. Android OS makes relatively heavy use of them. Here's an example of a Google Chrome toast notification on Mac OS X: A list of descriptions of Toast windows on multiple platforms: Web (by Adobe) Android Microsoft


25

I was having a discussion with my housemate who is a data analyst by trade, and the conclusion that we came to is that there are two sensible options here, depending on the amount of work you personally want to do (we're assuming here that the collection of gender data is actually useful to you, rather than simply of interest in which case it may be better ...


25

What about "the visual part of the application, i.e. its buttons, text boxes and other visual elements"? In a more detailed form, you would also include that it handles: The process of displaying the elements to the user through a screen, The interaction of the user with those elements (most commonly known as events, but it's not limited to events). ...


24

“Intuitive” (technically, it should be “intuitable”) means the user can use the UI without having to consciously stop and figure the UI out. Learned habituated responses are performed without conscious thought, so intuitive includes more than instincts. Intuitive is desirable because the less the user has to think about the UI, the more they can focus on ...


24

I notice that the answers cover a slightly different field from what was asked in the comment by JonW: Really, what I'm interested in is whether or not people know what they can do with tags after they've already been assigned - such as browsing the site using tags to find related content, as opposed to just tagging content with relevant tags. so ...


23

In What Drives Content Tagging: The Case of Photos on Flickr (Nov, Naaman, Ye, 2008), content tagging by a random sample of Flickr users is analysed: We contacted a random sample of users, selected from a page of photos uploaded recently to Flickr, and emailed 1373 users an invitation to participate in the webbased survey. A total of 237 valid ...


23

A "field" wouldn't just apply to the internet (or technical manifestations of forms). Any form where the user fills in spaces contains "fields" and it's common on paper forms (such as application forms, tax return forms, etc.) to see text such as *Please complete all the fields marked with a * *, etc. So I'd say this is a widely used term in the "real ...


22

Stories are usually the best way to explain things in a memorable way. Like if you said, "Let me give you an example, 'Once there was this guy.." Here is an alternate explanation I gave at a party last week. He asked, "What is User Experience Design?" Me: "What is a product or service that you just love and tell people about all the time?" [He ...


21

'Split Buttons' or 'Split Button Dropdowns' From MSDN: Split buttons Use a split button to consolidate a set of variations of a command, especially when one of the commands is used most of the time. Using a split button saves a significant amount of screen space, while also providing powerful choices. Unlike a menu button, clicking the left portion of ...


20

The general rule of thumb for usability is to start off with no feedback, but to then display some busy indicator after 200ms, and if the process normally takes 5 seconds or more to present a larger feedback element (usually with a time elapsed timer, but preferably not with a progress bar unless you're very sure how long it will take). If something is ...


20

Conventions and the conscious breaking of The vast majority of people don't have their mouse buttons swapped. Even people who use the mouse with their left hand, often keep the buttons as they would normally be (myself is an example for this). Thus, people who swap these buttons can be considered in UX as complementary personas (people with special ...


18

Humanized interfaces make use of heuristics, emotional design and humanized copy to make an interaction with a computer feel as natural as possible. Heuristics Humanized interfaces try to explain errors in a helpful way, and prevent users from causing them whenever possible. Instead of a message like "504 gateway timeout" twitter throws out this message: ...


17

It's a cute quote, but not entirely accurate. The human body is intuitive. How do you use your eyes? How do you digest food? How do you use your brain to learn? Intuition: The act or faculty of knowing or sensing without the use of rational processes; immediate cognition. We use alot of labels to describe how easy a system is to understand and ...


17

I believe this design was invented by McCrickard and Catrambone of the Georgia Institute of Technology: McCrickard DS & Catrambone R (1999). Beyond the scrollbar: An evolution and evaluation of alternative navigation techniques. Proceedings of the 1999 IEEE Symposium on Visual Languages, p270-277. It seems very similar ideas were independently ...


17

Exit I don't know if your user base is international but I guess it is of varying levels of English and varying levels of IT skills. Exit is universal for leave, quit and go away (remember not everyone thinks like us geeks!) Take these users: The grandma who has just got her first laptop I want this to go away ... quit [negative connotations, implies it ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible