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8

It's because the page content is typically on a light background. The dark footer clearly visually delineates the 'page content' from the 'site footer' area using contrast.


8

Your better bet is to have different featured products, not changing the site. You need to identify a difference between the site and the features. The site is what will give users confidence ( in the brand name and everything that goes with it ), so you need to keep that brand confidence, which giving variation that suggests a range of products and keeping ...


7

one thing: When you see a print magazine on the shelf, obviously the cover page varies from month to month, however, enough stays constant that you can recognize the same magazine from one month to the next and that's how it should be - enough difference to show flair and variation, and avoid stagnation, but similar enough to provide consistency and ...


6

You're essentially asking how to design an pamphlet to interrupt someone's attention and get them to read something that they aren't interested in. The answer is that you shouldn't. It's poor UX. If you want people to read a pamphlet, however there are a few things that you can do (outside of the design of the pamphlet) to increase that possibility: ...


5

Generally speaking, frequent redesigns are a big no-no. Not only do they re-position all the UI elements, but your visitors may also think it's a different website from the one they wanted to visit. This is especially important in case of e-commerce websites and other services where money is involved. This is true even if you don't drastically change the ...


4

I would make a distinction between presenting the usability study and the usability study results. Generally the results of a usability study are for managers or other non UX people who are only interested in what you found and what they can do with it. Their interest usually has nothing to do with you methodology or details about who you asked etc. By ...


3

Template - Something that serves as a model for others to copy: "a template for change". Theme - Give a particular setting or ambience to (a venue or activity): "themed menus". So in essence, looking at the definition, a template usually refers to a frame. A set of building blocks grouped in a given way which lets you fill it with your own content. A ...


3

It clearly indicates the law of closure or the way a site gets binded up well with a darker patch at the bottom. This is really against a contrasting color that the black works. The footer is a great area also to unearth some of the information/link that we do not find somewhere else. So keeping a distinct color such as black, always a design decision but ...


3

I'm now using Jekyll. It does exactly what I asked for in the question. Basically, it compiles my prototype from reusable parts into a serve-able static HTML form. Jekyll supports both includes ("snippets") and layouts ("masters"). And it compiles the templated files to complete HTML files for serving up as a static prototype under Apache or even just ...


3

A "web-page template" is simply a template that is used for a web page. Yes, I know that doesn't help answer the question directly, but it's necessary to understand what a template is to understand how it applies to web development. From googling "template definition" (emphasis mine): tem·plate/ˈtemplit/ Noun: A shaped piece of metal, wood, ...


2

It is a principle of branding that you should create something consistently recognizable. You want to be memorable and easy to understand, and having a consistent design is part of that. Every design has a learning curve, and once people learn where everything is on your site, they don't want to be challenged repeatedly to learn it again.


2

If you decide to go with something other than phpBB, you should be able to export/import the data. For example, there are scripts to migrate from phpBB to bbPress. I would suggest you start by comparing the vanilla installations of a few pieces of forum software (this might be a starting point) and identifying which you think is most user-friendly. Next, ...


2

I've never heard of a desktop website before, but that's beside the point :) If you're the only person/organization involved in a project, you can afford having a global rule and stick to it. But if you're working with external clients/developers/designers, you'll need to define it on a project-by-project basis, or else to get them to accept your definition ...


2

For PowerPoint, I would recommend Keynotopia's templates, available here: http://keynotopia.com/web-prototyping/ For Axure, I would recommend Axutopia's templates, available here: http://axutopia.com/libraries/axure-web-widgets-library/ I included the web app ones specifically, but they have bundles if you prototype other types of apps. Both come with ...


2

From an aesthetic perspective, the dark mega footer "closes" the dark header. This way the content on the light background is sandwiched between two dark elements. This reuses the design language introduced in the header to draw attention again to the footer.


2

The template "tags" you are referring to are probably better termed as parameters, template variables, or even placeholders. Any of these will work better than the term "tag". Also, a little bit of text explaining what a parameter is (i.e., "A value will be substituted in the template whenever you use a parameter.") would also reduce confusion.


2

In this context, a template defines the structure of the output, while a theme defines the look. In reality, these two concerns are not always clearly separated. In the Joomla! world, many professional templates are themable, since one can change the styling with configuration options. So themes are often part of a template, and a template can be themable.


2

Try to look for pattern repositories, like ui-patterns.com or patternry Another solution would be to show how different the finished product can be of a wireframe, based on, like, wireframeshowcase. Personally, I like to define UI in patterns, that is, to define what is the problem the user is facing, and what is a corresponding solution, and provide a lot ...


2

Provide a rich text editor toolbar like what you see here, and make a combobox-like selection of available placeholders. The more interesting part comes on the rendering of the edited text, as the placeholder is expected to be an atomic token, therefore two behaviours are wouldbe expected in my opinion: highlighted handling: usually, a "capsule", with ...


1

If you, as the SaaS provider, are able to offer predefined templates, it helps you stand out as an 'expert' for users and prospects. If this is possible, then that is a huge win for you. Being able to label 'Templates' as a time saving feature, will often entice users to subscribe because it sounds more useful than duplicating existing records. Remember, the ...


1

Theresa Neil, author of Designing Web Interfaces, has identified 12 standard screen patterns, these being (in no particular order): Master/Detail Column browse List item Search / results Filter dataset Form Pallet / Canvas Dashboard Spreadsheet Wizard Question & Answer Parallel panels Interactive model Blank state ...


1

If I understand what you are trying to do, you might look at a template system like Moustache. What's great about it is you can start with client-side templates, then migrate the same templates to the server-side if and when you actually implement the protoype. Moustach.js on github: http://mustache.github.com/ Demo: http://mustache.github.com/#demo


1

Use an HTML editor like Komodo that supports Snippets. I've got Komodo set up to allow me to insert snippets based on the Foundation Framework. So instead of having to type out Div/container, div/row, div/four columns, etc., I can just double-click a snippet, possibly enter variables if I've set up the snippet that way, and boom. Also, I'm assuming ...


1

I imagine that content of the magazine is much more substantial than a blog post, but you may find some inspiration from top notch designer Jason Santa Maria's blog for examples of alternating templates. You have to page through probably 10 different posts to get an idea of how much he's changing the scene for each article. He also offers some ...


1

My view is that consistency of layout and design is better for both usability and branding. Subtle changes, for instance, theming during a particular period is fine depending on the magazine content and readership. Of course, you can always experiment for a while, A/B testing layouts to figure out which is best. Analytics should help you there. But I would ...


1

If we are speaking about a monthly released magazine: Imagine some physical magazine. Most of them have different cover every time, but same identity (logo, heading, place of price, month etc.). The best solution in my opinion: make every month different, but keep the branding consistent (give a feeling like: "yeah, a ton of content again!") Art magazines ...


1

Check out conversionvoodoo.com's homepage. It rotates based on the time of the day and it has increased their conversion rate. Navigation is consistent. Measure, change, repeat.


1

I have never experimented with this personally, however, I did have a contact owner of a decent sized site (10,000 daily uniques) who would change his color scheme from time to time. He mentioned that each time he did this he would see a spike in traffic for a period. Maybe take the Google route and just change up the logo? This seems to be a big draw in ...


1

You might want to consider changing the site you are asking this on ;) Try this site instead.



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