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78

Root Level Progression I think a better approach if your sub tasks are completing very quickly would be moving the progress bar to the root elements. Or outside of the table completely (if it's an option) which also gives you the ability to use different icons if a sub task fails etc.


54

I would hide the progress bar once a task is completed. Progress bars communicate to the user that something may take awhile so maybe you could hide the progress bar at 100% and even change the word to DONE. If all the tasks start out as DONE then awesome I have to tell all my friends how fast you are!


28

No, don't slow down the job. There's nothing wrong with having something be instantly 100% done. Your app will actually seem better than if you slow things down so that the progress bar animation is visible. Users would love nothing more than to have everything happen instantly.


12

A good way to test if content is the problem is A/B testing. If you are dealing with a product page, have two different versions of the product page written up by the content developers, then split the users in half - each viewing only one of the content pages, and compare the completion rates for the two groups. If there is significant variance in ...


12

I was thinking in a similar line as @Yako: Do not slow down any tasks, but think on what gives a nice user experience separately. My suggestion: Don't slow down the task, slow down the bar Just let your tasks run, and measure their progress, but rather than displaying the updated progress immediately, do something more smooth. For example: define a ...


9

I think that a perceptible progression may be a good idea after all: If it jumps straight from 0 to 100, did it really work? Wasn't it a bug? However, it's important not to actually slow down the job, but only its perception by the user. So, here are a few features I would likely implement in that case: an animation of 100ms between each step (so ...


8

Apple refers to them as Badges as used by the Apple Push Notification Service on iOS devices. More generally "Notification Badges" when discussed outside the context of notifications. Anyone tinkering with iOS notifications is familiar with the term Badges to refer to these. Android apps sometimes use these to the same effect but I've heard them called ...


6

You could use a specific use case instead of a general one and observe how your test subjects uses the sidebar as a tool to complete that task. For example your main article might be 'A guide to good fish restaurants in Manhattan'. Your test case might be 'Where would you go to find articles about good steak restaurants in Manhattan?'


5

Your own strategy sounds pretty good. If this is a continual issue for you though, you may want to look into a low-cost eye tracking solution. Eyetracking is much less invasive than it used to be, and much cheaper as well. I wouldn't be surprised if there's some open source eyetracking software out there that will run on a cheap webcam. A cheap solution ...


4

There are a couple of general tactics I use to design non-leading research. Feedback feedback feedback! This is the single most important thing, because it's really easy to forget how much more you know about the problem you're trying to solve than the user does. I encourage my team members to call me out when I'm being leading and give them positive ...


4

If errors are clearly indicated, then users can assume that a task that is not marked as an error did complete successfully. However, if most users may have never seen the record for an errored task, then this confusion could occur. Here are my two suggestions, and in my opinion, you should utilize both, but one should be be sufficient: Change 0 seconds ...


4

You might think about confirming the user's action to complete the task after they've clicked the button. For example, using a lightbox style overlay: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Of course you could choose to use another treatment than the lightbox, the main thing being the user has a confirmation that ...


4

All this is assuming you need everything on a single page. Show ongoing lectures on top. You can show % completed or some other value to give them a slight tug to finish the lesson. Unlocked lessons should follow the ongoing lectures. They get a description of the course and some other vital information. Finally, they can see their completed courses and ...


4

Google Scholar search for "haptic klm" came up with these updates to KLM: FLM (fingerstroke level model) The traditional Keystroke-Level Model (KLM) was not applicable to predict the task performance in the touch-sensitive user interface. This case study thus proposed Fingerstroke Level Model (FLM), and analyzed the inter-network mirroring game - ...


3

For me as a user, I like the websites where it is possible to register in a simple and fast way. This usually means entering only the data needed to access the website (username, password and email). I only feel like I want to customize my profile when I actually enter the website and I see that I have an account, I am connected to the website. So my ...


3

The problem with your option is that they provide very distinctive values to the use i.e Played it Completed it Mastered it There are no intermediate values which would allow the user to provide an option which says I am currently playing it and have completed 70% of the missions. I guess the slider can kind of illustrate that but unless you have some ...


3

There are two questions two answer here... 1. What do you need to do with the data? It is important to keep in mind what data you are trying to get from a user. If you are trying to get their subjective opinion on how they are through a game, a 1-100 scale, using a free-sliding slider input, could give you a more in-depth idea as to what they are thinking. ...


2

You may want to consider utilizing Google analytics "custom events", to determine if content is the reason users are dropping off. You can use these custom events to set off triggers that will feedback to you whether the user has begun reading, abandoned after starting to read, or finishes reading the entire article/text. I must warn you however, that this ...


2

If you're attempting to get a non-colorblind user's attention, yellow is actually the most attention grabbing color. Yellow is less associated with anger and frustration (although it is still sometimes associated with those feelings), it is generally shown to be a more positive color. Red does have more of an association with errors, and as @user12999 ...


2

You have two different data groups that you are wanting to show, that have different units of measure. Progress Status (3 states: Not Started, In Progress, Completed) Due Date Status (1 state: Overdue) When you put two different data groups on a single axis you will very likely create confusion at best, and will present mis-information at worst. You want ...


2

I always feel like introducing a significant change in the screen after a user has completed something makes it very clear that the user has completed something. Where as, not changing anything on the screen makes it feel like whatever I was trying to accomplish has not been done, because I am still looking at generally the same thing I was looking at ...


2

In my opinion you should trust your users and let them mark something as complete themselves. In our learning platform we have something called Space with several chapters, chapters can be just markdown text, quiz or assignment. The quiz is completed when you get a 100% score and the assignment needs to be peer reviewed. But the markdown chapter can be ...


2

I don't want to go to far out on a limb and speak for all users here, but I'm not sure I would ever choose smooth progress bar animation over faster running task. I would be perfectly happy to see a task take basically no time, in fact when I am watching an install or other staged process, I love it when one item zips right to completion, going directly ...


2

Don't forget that a progress bar is merely a feedback tool to indicate to the user that something is actually happening, if a task is taking longer than a second or two, and no UI changes are being shown. Twenty years ago, in the days of Macintosh System 6.0.5 and prior (or if you were from the other side, Windows 3.1), processors were not fast enough ...


1

instead of using hover (because it's not feasible for touch), I suggest you should implement something like a wizard. Going step by step, the user knows exactly what (s)he is entering. The benefit: You can create hotspots, wherein you can highlight buttons with colour schemes for a few seconds before making them neutral. This way the user will only see ...


1

I'd choose solution 2. Each step requires some user activity. It means user performs some actions and goes to next step. In solition 1 what you insert is not pure step it is rather transition between steps. User is not involved in process, he just passively observe progress. Also as this screen contains only progress bar, user could loose focus on task ...


1

We have 3 actions that can be done with task save - which saving any changes cancel - which just delete any changes in current edit session done/complete - which ending a whole task So, how about making 3 buttons. Completing task button could have a label like "Save&Complete". And after clicking message box like {Serg}. In fact "Complete&Save" ...


1

Here's an idea I had. You can help figure it out by commenting, or suggest any of your own with a separate answer. Instead of the checkbox, add a button labeled “Complete Task”. Upon clicking it, it would turn into a simple label stating “Completed”. The button would convey a feeling of taking an action, and also committing to its consequences. The only ...


1

THere is no simple answer for that, as the complexity comes with the ideation, and as idea influences UX and UX influences idea, the two usually pump the process up. In other words - it is possible to calculate the timings only if you have the whole idea (also about UX) shaped, and this is basically the moment when you already have UX done. Especially for ...


1

It depends on the task at hand. If you know what the output and input is, than you would probably know what time it takes to analyze the input and produce the output. If you don't know, you need to devide and concur, and break down the task into understandable measurable pieces. Then it easier to make a decent estimate. The good thing is that you use Agile ...



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