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1

How about a 'fridge' magnet? Have the available options stuck to the inside of the door, or on a wall near the door. Let the user stick the appropriate one to the outside of the door. For non-metal doors, apply a metal panel which is slightly larger than the magnets.


2

The usual solution these days is not to have a "clean" sign at all. If "do not disturb" is not displayed, the maid may knock and ask if the room should be cleaned. Some hotels, as an "ecological" (and cost-saving) option, will let guests preregister as not wanting full room service, or use various conventions for indicating this. They still use the "clean ...


6

A solution that seems to meet the requirements, but still doesn't seem great: a stiff piece of plastic with a profile like this: __________________|___________________ Top down it looks like this: [ Clean | Do not disturb ] You slide it under the door, with the appropriate bit sticking out. The vertical tab in the middle stays inside the ...


4

You could have a long U-shaped plastic tab that fits over the latch portion of the door, with one side of it labeled 'Do Not Disturb' and the other side as 'Please Clean The Room'. The occupant puts this over the door latch before closing & then locking the door. This should meet all of your requirements: hard to misuse - the side of the plastic ...


45

Various hotels I have come across (though I remember that primarily from China) had simple lamps with the respective do not disturb and please clean room signs next to the door and accordingly labeled switches on the inside of the room to activate either of the exterior lights. It cannot be used by anyone other than the guest. It costs somewhat more than a ...


46

I have seen indicators that are inserted into the key card slot so that keys can't be inserted until the indicator is removed. These solve the problem of being accidentally changed, since they are anchored to the door. Pros: The user is almost always required to be looking directly at the tag when inserting it into the door lock, so it is unlikely to be ...


18

Sliders attached to the doors can do the trick. The material used will determine the options to fix them, their appearance and their longevity. This solution seems to be consistent with your two first conditions. Here are examples : Original wordings can then check your two last conditions. For example : on the left under half : "Everything is just ...


27

There is something called Paperless Signs like below While a passerby can still switch the action. Here the mode of turning the light on should be only available with the guest. I guess punching the room card/keys. Whichever sign you'll punch your card on the light will glow.


0

"So by all means vary the style for the tags but don't switch them around." <-- I totally agree. It's a visual style issue not an information hierarchy issue. The events are sub info chunks of the main info chunk "see our events", so they have to be of lower heading hierarchy. However, you might have the intention of pointing out the user i.e. to a ...


0

Consider which is important, based on if the view is repetitive in nature. There can be 2 cases for such representation of data. Repeating view with dynamic data (for smaller header) Limited view with static data. For case 1 : Let's consider a case where user view this frequently, and as they keep repeating, larger header keep becoming less important. ...


1

There are two things you need to consider when it comes to the visual presentation of hierarchy: Functional aspect - is the presentation of visual hierarchy consistent? If you can apply this in a consistent manner then it will create the effect required in the organization of content on your page. I imagine that if you had a lot of large h3 tags it might ...



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