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19

Nielsen says: "Tag clouds were a huge fad in 2009, and have actually been a fad for several years. Even so, usability studies show that most normal users don't know what they are and don't know how to deal with them." Although he doesn't link to any studies, I tend to believe him. Tag clouds are hard to understand and hard to process visually. If it's a ...


18

Well they should be for different uses. Tagging is for adding some meta data to an object. To describe it. Categories are more organizational and a way of grouping all content into few groups. Here is a good article explaining the difference. So its the age old answer that "it depends" on the use. If you want the users to just add more description and ...


16

Try to explain it in terms of reverse searching. Basically, "if you needed to find this database entry later, but you forgot its name, what would you type in the search box?"


11

The idea behind tags is the same as the idea behind labels in GMail: the ability to assign multiple tags to a single post/mail/.../item. The GMail labeling of e-mails was born specifically to counter the need in most e-mail clients to archive an e-mail in a single specific folder which ususally would be part of a hierarchy of folders. So what do you do with ...


9

Partly to do with the likely matching lower case of the word when found embedded in the relevant content. Partly to provide a consistent nature to the tags without seeming to give any one tag preferential treatment or any sense of importance that is not due. Partly to remove a layer of complication when creating, defining, exposing, using, sharing, ...


9

As mentioned in Smashing UX Design by Jesmond Allen and James Chudley of cxpartners, who have many years of experience with high profile retail website, they recommend using tabs in this way with caution as in usability testing they find that people don't always see the tabs. Tabs typically differentiate unconnected groups of items. Compartmentalizing items ...


8

You'll want to convey the benefits of proper tagging to her. What's in it for her? Show her that, demonstrate how it works, and you'll get buy-in. Your user sounds like a scientist. She'll get it. I'm guessing that you're absolutely right about this being a mental model mismatch. She seemed to think you were looking for alt text, based on the sample you ...


7

As a UX professional, I'm not convinced there really is a difference. The article jonshariat links to makes a case for categories being mutually exclusive. If universally true, then that's perhaps the one difference, but given that many sites use tags as a form of category browser, I don't think that holds true either. But let's assume it does. From an ...


7

I personally prefer tagging to using categories. The advantages of categories: clearly defined could be hierarchical static (in most cases) The advantages of using tags: unstructured could be very easy user-defined The advantages of using tagging is that the amount of tags something can have is unlimited, and ultimately users can tag items ...


6

No. And the reason is that even though it looks simple, it's quite complicated. First you need to refocus on the add-tag button, then find the word inline again. And you need to be exact on dropping since a word in text can be quite small. A much better solution would be to mark the word, right-click and tag. Or even implement a keyboard shortcut such as ...


5

Tagging seems to be a huge trend on many sites, especially with the use of the word tag on Twitter, etc. Most sites like this are using the tag terminology.


5

The critical issue, from your description, is finding related/similar proposals. Have a look at this visualisation: force directed layout, which could cluster your documents, giving you the kind of periodic table you are looking for, that can then be explored. The UX advantage here is that instead of requesting each group of related proposals with a ...


5

I think the interface looks fine. I think you are too loose in what you offer your users with the ability to tag. Everything isn't a tag. A lot of these options seem mutually exclusive. A song's era is basically in and around its release date -- songs created in the 1920's are always going to be 1920's songs and that's never going to change. A song has ...


5

A couple of slightly "hacky" solutions: Turn every single word into keywords; I'm imagining there's a search box somewhere (as opposed to a list of all keywords) and the client won't search for "the" anyway. If I'm wrong, and you do have a list of all keywords, perhaps that's not the right move. Try naming them something other than keywords; topics, ...


4

Tags should fit in the following sentence: This item is about _________. This simple and useful guideline came from UXExchange, the precursor of ux.stackexchange.com. (I came up with it, so of course I think it's useful.) So "tagging" would be for an item about the process of tagging, "tags" would be for an item about the actual tags themselves, and ...


4

Tags are folksonomy, so as DA01 rightly points out, you don't prescribe them. Typically if they are prescribed they will be categories.


4

I find tag clouds to be rather distracting. I can say that I have never clicked on one. I understand that the larger the tags are, the more popular they are, but it doesn't seem to work nearly as well as the "Recent Tags" sidebar on this site, which displays a count next to the tag, and lists them in an easily scannable list. To me, tag clouds are just ...


4

I can understand your concerns regarding messy tagging, however i think you should allow tagging. There are a couple of things you could implement to guide the user in the tagging process. First of all, i think it's sensible to only allow a small amount of tags, say 3. This forces the user to really think about the tags, and prevents tag lists like vampires ...


4

I would allow users to add tags with a link rather than just add them from any text they type, this would make them think about new tags and stop the majority of spelling errors (this should be a comment I know but I wanted to add the mock-up). download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


3

If you are putting together a tagbase yourself you run the risk of infecting the content with your own personal perspective of what should and should not be tagged, whereas the intention of tags is for them to act as the users' own interpretation of what is meaningful to them. Depending on the role of a person within the company, different people will be ...


3

Keeping a tag set consistent over time is difficult for one tagger (e.g. blogs) and even more difficult for groups of people. (Look at any SE site, for instance.) So whatever your initial tag set, you should plan for tags to be refactored, renamed, and removed as the group reaches consensus or needs change. If you plan for retagging from the start, then ...


3

Ideally you would be able to have a bit of both. A robust, expertly designed structure based on user research. Plus an ongoing folksonomy that allows for ongoing improvement and validation. However the comment above that few users take the time to add a tag is generally correct. When adding a profile of themselves or uploading their products for sale, ...


3

We are facing a similar situation where our client has a huge catalog and wants to allow its users to successively filter down the content by drilling down into a hierarchy defined by them; a hierarchy they can decide to change anytime and as much as they want. Add to that the fact that the target platform is Android, its omnipresent back button and ...


3

Though I agree in part with the answers already posted, you can impose structure on tags. Rather than using 'hierarchy', a better term is 'relationship'. Consider some of the potential relationships between two tags: is parent of is child of is type of is subset of is opposite of Of course, each type of tag relationship adds extra complexity to your user ...


3

We have two cases here: The tag vocabulary is fixed. The tag vocabulary can grow. Use number 1 for things that are unlikely to evolve with time, like the number of states in a country. When this is the case, you're not likely to have similar words, and when making a mistakes is very useful just to type twice backspace or clicking the x and delete the ...


3

Is "all lower-case" a rule? If you google "tag cloud images", you'll find all kinds of tags. Example from Wikipedia: The advantage I see for a pure lowercase situations, is that the tags could be used in a context where lowercase makes sense. Eg This post is marked with tag, tagging, lowercase and question as opposed to This post is marked ...


2

I would advise you not to make rules for tagging. The whole point of tagging is that it's flexible and mostly user generated. For avoiding typos you could implement auto-completion.


2

My first question would be what value would a user get from an interface that presents 700 tags to them? The first change I would make would be to cut off the shown tags. Show, say, ten tags or something and then have text after the last tag that says "And 690 more." If the user really wants to see those tags they can click on that and have a larger ...


2

I used LittleSnapper for Mac and you can easily categorized your images and you can make folders also. I used also different social bookmarking tools such as Zootool and Minus to share and organized screen capture images from the web.


2

Generally tags are used to match search keywords and categories are used for browsing. I would tag the projects the way you first suggested and you could consider adding the programming language or other relevant skills to the project.



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