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3

Yes, it's good to inform users ...particularly if there are mixed links on the page (some open in new tabs and some don't). One popular way to denote new-tab links inline is to use an icon as follows: If you're developing using CSS, this can be done in a way that fails gracefully for text-only or accessibility browsers. You can insert an :after sprite, ...


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I think if the link will be redirecting to a different site, then it's helpful to convey this information to the user by means of an icon. The second icon in the question is apt for such cases. If the link will be redirecting to same site on the domain, then opening the link in new tab is not required. For plain text links, a small icon just next to the ...


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The issue with tabs is the space that you can show them on mobile devices. It's really good if you know that you only have say three items to show, but when it comes to future proofing, there's not enough space to go width wise without paginating. The way in which I see it is the use of tabs should be for the immediate usage in the journey and the draw is ...


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Consider the content to be displayed in the app; you're displaying lists. This means that when thinking about navigation, the most natural way to start is by 'listing' your list choices. Your heirarchy is fine, and the tabs are a good starting point in this case. A good convention when designing for tablets is a vertical bar design, like google uses for ...


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If you want to approach it in a UX fashion, then I would suggest doing a bit of design thinking. Google ventures do a good version of it their design sprints which works well for us. If you pick a small story, like "as a [who is looking at the information], I would like to see a users information, so that [what is the intent - why is someone looking at the ...


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Tabs are OK if you have space for them and when data within tabs are different (e.g. histories consist of long list of logs). Dropdown is very poor solution - you hide navigation and force user to remember that ther is an "Activities" option. I recomend using tabs on desktop and change them into native dropdown on mobile. Showing everything on one page ...


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Data is data and that's why tables were invented in the 1st place :) In your case, user really needs to have a clear overview of the details so again, a simple table (nicely drawn, headers, linear) would suffice. But if you really want to give it a bump, just try to transform the entire thing into a card/vcard format with classical approach: Personal ...


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Left aligned labels with there values placed to the right would make this page way easier to read. Right now, there is no flow, and my eyes keeps bouncing around. If you want to spice things up you could make the persons name a h2 tag and make their company a smaller h4 tag. Then have the persons details displayed below that in a table like format. There ...


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1. Limit inputs to things that are required It should be very clear to your users why they are being asked to input anything on a form. I assume you are already doing this and there are still just too many inputs that different users may want to use on your very large form. In that case, consider putting all required inputs up top and then grouping ...


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Both in one interface Sounds like you have a great candidate for a "drill-down" scenario. Provide a high-level, simple view into the data and allow users to drill down for details. Also provide a switch in the interface to change the view type to higher density, like a grid/list view option. Here's the control seen in Google Drive: Grid: List:



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