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2

Do you expect the user to add many custom topics? In other words, do you fear the list would be too long if you concatenate both lists? If not, I'd make it a single dropdown. [ pick a topic ▼ ] |----------------| |Create new topic| |----------------| |Custom topic 1 | |Custom topic 2 | |----------------| |Default topic 1 ...


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This is called a Bad Idea Because it only makes navigation harder and has hardly any benefit. You could argue that in some cases (tall content sections) you sometimes have 1 or 2 more lines of text on screen. But that doesn't weigh up against the navigation problems it will create. All the other answers mention a (scrolling) navigation bar, and for good ...


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What you're describing sounds like the "Tab" + menu UI used on the Semantic UI framework, specifically on this page. The behavior of the tabs and the right menu seems pretty similar to what you're describing. http://semantic-ui.com/modules/tab.html#/definition


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I don't know a specific name for the style, but it seems to be a fixed div with in-page navigation. You put a fixed div at the top of the page with a menu and then each div is named such as <a name="Section 1" /> Then, at the top of your page, in the menu bar (your fixed ), you'd put the link to that section: <a href=”#Section ...


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If you're looking for something that is literally repeated throughout the content of the page then I don't know that there is a specific name for it but I would call it something like "Repeated inline navigation", maybe? If you're looking for something that has the navigation locked to a certain position (usually the top of the window) and updates based on ...


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I would try something like "Top bar", "Navigation top bar", "Scrolling nav" or something like that. I don't know if it is official name, but it describes it good. These pages are using something like it: http://andy-hook.co.uk/ https://2015.avocode.com/


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So I think essentially you are trying to provide a UI with multiple steps of selections. I think tabs are fine, but separate each tab/option a little bit to make them more like selectable options; and have separate rows for each selection, with a title (optionally a subtitle) explaining what is the selection about. Screenshot below is from Apple online ...


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I think the tabs aren't the best solution for the second step. You can try to use a select. Maybe something like this with a natural language:


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You can combine options 2 and 3, to link the scroll position and which tab appears selected. As in the Change active tab depending on scroll position answer. Or you can use Miller columns as in Finder on Mac.


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Your best bet is Option 1. Let me address your concerns: -Separate page/form for each plugin seems pretty heavy Unless you can know for sure how many settings each plugin will have, giving an entire page seems to be the most flexible option. Furthermore, it creates a separation in the user's brain that seems useful: There is no interaction between each ...


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It all depends on the number of things you might need to account for (scalability). Another way to score this is based on efficiency: Option 1 users can access everything with just one mouse-click. Nothing is hidden. Option 2 users need to make 1 mouse-click and scroll the page to view everything. Some things are hidden until you scroll. Option 3 users ...


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I think collapsible section on the right may be better. It makes it easier to read and see the different sections. Tabs are also limited in size and width. With a collapsible section you have more space for the title and purpose of each plugin. It can grow vertically dynamically.


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A fourth option would be an extra settings dialog for every plugin. But this would certainly be the worst option because it will separate the options. Basically you have to take three numbers into account: number of NPCs number of MODs number of options per NPC/MOD Depending on what number is more likely to grow you will have to decide between your ...



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