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2

You need to research your audience group with the following questions in mind: How familiar are they with the steps involved in opening a link in a new tab? If they do know how, under what circumstances will they do so? Will you run into them with your site/application? I work for a company with an online project management product. In my recent ...


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As a writer of money making, monopolistic, don't care about the UX, enterprise software ;-) I have to say that AgilePro asks some valid questions here. In my view, there are limited cases where creating a js windowing system could give the user a better experience. But some background first. When we choose the browser as client for our applications, we ...


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Another option is the following scheme: Location Tabs List of all opportunities for that location w/ search controls to display only one kind of opportunity or a combination of a few.


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Regarding your size issue: Is there a size of your tabs in which 80-90% of the labels fit? If so I would suggest using that size as your default. And for bigger tabs you could make them grow according to content. That way you will have a good solution for most of your users and still be able to accomodate those select few that have bigger names for the ...


7

If you are going to use a skeuomorph you should avoid unnecessary and baroque decoration Here's some originals from my current desktop (the wooden one) to help us understand what it is we are trying to represent to the user: Arrows don't add anything to this visual metaphor, they only serve to distract and confuse. As an example of this deleterious ...


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A combination of the following: Consider moving the tree to the right side of the screen. if the user frequently shows and hides the tree, the content of the work area always moves around. If the tree is on the right, it will only cover the right half of the work area, but the "most important" elements of the content area remain in place. Make "Select ...


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OK, this is my first answer at UX, so bear with me, but my approach would be this: PROBLEM 1) You need to have that sidebar menu 2) You need to have a "content" or "canvas" area which will be sub-divided in 2 vertical halves. 3) You'd like to have some space in this "canvas" PROPOSED SOLUTION With this in mind, I think your best bet would be to hide/show ...


1

I think the core problem is the arrow or triangle. Most important is for the tab to stand out from its fellows as the selected tab. Beyond that is the principle of connection to the content. One way is to have the content background colour seamlessly flow onto the tab, as shown in Mervin Johnsingh's examples. If you must have a different coloured ...


1

One interpretation of the arrow up in your rendering (alternative B) is that the body of the text is like a speech-bubble. This makes it look like it comes from the header, which feels more natural than an arrow in my opinion. But as many have said, it is probably better to give the tab the same color as the content in that case.


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Arrow pointing down is the right way. I am sure the focus here was the arrow direction, I am just covering related points: There are a couple of incorrect usages in this sample. The top rectangles are like switches with bulbs embedded inside them. When you press, they should light up. Here, they become dark. The untouched buttons are brighter. Maybe ...


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My recommendation would be for option A as you are providing a visual indicator from the tab text to the content below stating that this is the highlighted tab and the related content for it is below as shown in the screenshot below This will hold good even if you move on to the other tabs as the users will scan the content from left to right and with the ...


6

Interface design, historically, was based on physical things from the real world in order to increase familiarity for the user, and hence trivially communicate how the interface should be expected to work through analogy. This is why we call things like "folder", "desktop", etc, by those names. In a tabbed interface, the analogy is to a folder with tabs, ...


11

They both look wrong and unecessary. For a tabbed interface the colour of the tab should be the colour of the selected page.


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Option B is breaking the horizontal line between tabs and content. #it just feels unpleasant. Option A is a complete menu plus an arrow dictating the flow direction telling you to read the content, feels good. Maybe try another option C without arrows, but A is good.


2

A "down" arrow points to the headline, which directs a user's eyes and attention to follow it toward the text below. If your goal is to get them to read the text, that's a good visual cue. The "up" arrow has the opposite effect, pulling the reader's eye back to the nav bar. Option 2 has me constantly going back to read "Item" instead of the headline or ...


20

Adding to Will's answer, if you're looking for a non directional highlight, here is a great example from Google's material Design Material design guidelines on using Tabs The tab corresponding to the visible content is highlighted. Tabs are grouped together and the group of tabs are in turn connected with their content. Keeping tabs adjacent ...


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Which relationship do you want to emphasize? Use that to inform your decision. The down arrow in your image indicates a relationship of "is title of" or "is detailed by" or even "has child", whereas the up arrow indicates a relationship of "is detail of" or "has title" or even "has parent". I suspect the down arrow is more common and thus familiar to more ...



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