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Benefits of the first solution: Users can easily sort by first name. (*) You can have incomplete data (first or last name only). If you would have incomplete data in the second solution, it might not be clear if something is a first or last name. Benefits of the second solution: Works for every name (not everyone’s name is of the form first last). ...


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My recommendation would be something along these lines. Obviously, this is just a mock and you may want to do different things in terms of sizing, shading, and things like that. I think this makes sense because you have risks that are global, one-time type risks. Below that, you have phases which are visual descendants of the event and they have their own ...


2

Tabular data is traditionally difficult to read this becomes even more of an issue when additional layers of complecity are added in. I would suggest to look at the basic information you would like to convey and move away from tabular data (if your design efforts are not constrained of course) Based on my undertanding the main building blocks are : A- ...


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The idea is given multiple times, but none of them provides for the need for top level risks. I also wanted to show that it can be perfectly done in a more classic style table.


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You basically have two tables, you can let users to explore the data relationships. You click on an event and see the associated risks. Or you click a risk and see the relevant events. In the mockup the user has selected the second risk from the top, and the two associated events on the left are marked with a [v]. Of course the highlight should be more ...


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How about this for a starting point for discussion? It's still table-based, but I think it communicates the ideas you're trying to get across. Have a think about some more challenging scenarios and let me know if you think something like this has legs. I'd be happy to evolve the idea with you.


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I created a wireframe to show the way I imagine to you. If you visualize items and their attributes, you help user to understand and use your UI in a good way. When user opens indicated page it is good if he/she sees the general view of your risks, events and risk owners. When user wants go further to see details then you popup a simple window on mouse ...


2

Present the risk/event relationship as a two-dimensional table You have presented the problem as one of cross-reference, therefore you should solve it by presenting the data in a cross-reference format. A simple table with descriptors of each event and risk will directly connect the two for your users. Checkmarks or some other indicator token can indicate ...


1

Have you considered using Sprint management tools for user stories as best in practice examples? http://www.jetbrains.com/youtrack/ and https://sprint.ly/ work these kind of tasks quite well


1

If you can fit the information, I think a table would be much better because 1. it makes visually scanning the list easier. When the user has to jump over elments, borders, white space etc. to see the short description, it takes more effort and time. 2. You can fit more records in one page so the user needs to scroll less. 3. You can use inline filters - ...


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Not saying this is the "best", but the current version of MS Outlook shows the delete icon only when the mouse is hovered over the row: And then turns it to red when the mouse hovers over the delete button: Note that the icon they use is subtly different- the slightly "curved" X implies "delete/remove" as opposed to a straight X which in my mind is more ...


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You may use name and description columns and merge them all into a single table. Name is mandatory while description is optional.


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You may use a hierarchical structure. If the risk is global then place it under the top level goal, if the risk affects only some events then place it under the affected events only. You can do something like the following :


1

Rather than mixing many icons into the table it may be easier to use them as the header label (with a tool-tip on hover), and a simple check mark to indicate that a user has this role. I think that this approach allows for uniform column width and will make the table far more scannable.


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If your users will visit the list frequently and the roles will be maximum 10, then I recommend that you use icons and mouse over tooltips for their descriptions. Icons are much more superior than words for a quick visual scan. After a few interactions your users will learn the icons and their meaning. Otherwise if the users will not visit the list ...


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If the list is so big, i think that multiple columns with icons is not functional. I prefer to add their roles with checkbox choice.


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Simplifying your data when in a table is crucial to readability. When I make a front-end table, I use the same principles as if I would be doing a SQL table to some extent. If it were a database, you'd have a new item per role. instead of one enumerator that returned, or a csv. So in your table I would do that. What I think has happened to you here is you ...


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In principal the use of icons (on their own) to convey complex concepts is a very difficult enterprise because they are prone to multiple interpretations, so would strongly suggest identfying larger groups of roles rather than specific roles. However, if you intend to use icons, you need to include labels to make sure that the right meaning is conveyed. ...


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You say "could have up to 10"... But how many do most folks have? If most have 1 or 2 roles, you could show up to 2 icons plus a " more" link for those who need it. Another thought is maybe users could identify their primary role, then just display that icon with a link to "more" when needed. This way too, you are showing only the highest value info ...


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You are right to be worried about the number of icons becoming too large. Unless you can find icons that are really obvious, this will become overwhelming for the user. You could try splitting the roles up into a small number of categories, and assigning an icon to each category. For example, you could have a "management" category represented by an icon in ...


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The best option here depends on what your user needs to do. 1. If it's important to be able to quickly skim the list to find a Founder, it makes sense to put Founder in its own column like your second example. You can glance down any of the member type columns and quickly find the ones you're looking for. 2. If it's important to quickly learn about an ...


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The problem with using icons is that you are requiring the user to have an additional cognitive load of trying to remember which icons relates to which user group and as the user scans down the table, he will no longer have the header as the textual indicator of what each icon stands for. Instead of going with icons, I would recommend going with a ...


0

I have recently worked on a project which required to display a lot of information in a tabular format with large number of columns. We followed the following approach - Horizontal scroll is inevitable. You have to use it when dealing with lots of columns. The thing which you can do is maximize the number of columns visible to the user at once. Sometimes ...


0

Quite often when users have a requirement to display loads of columns, what they really mean is that every individual user has a different subset of columns that are important to them. In this scenario it can be useful to let users configure their own column order and layout (i.e. they can choose what columns to hide), so each user can see exactly what they ...


1

After running into the same issues quite recently at work, I followed these steps to reduce horizontal size, and try to adapt the content to smaller (or wide enough) screens: Reduce font size from 1em to 0.9em. The change is slim, but enough to reduce up to 2-3 columns when you have a lot of them. Analyse exactly the priority of each columns, and start ...


5

From an accessibility point of view, if you rely purely on colour coding, the information provided by those colours ('verified', 'problem' and 'unclassified') may be inaccessible (or misleading) to people who are unable to perceive the differences between those colours, either because they are colourblind or are perhaps completely blind. It also makes the ...


1

Quick Answer If it's being provided just for call centre employees, have you asked them which of the two they prefer? Running some quick mock-ups past them would resolve your quandry pretty quickly. More Formal Answer If you've got two different UI paradigms that your team are arguing over, the only way to work out which is the better one is to test them ...


0

Do Not Repeat Currency Symbol Currency symbols are boulders along the road our eye takes in reading a table of numbers. Omit them from any series of data values. Embed the currency symbol in the column header, such as Total ($). Even better, embed the three-letter standard ISO 4217 code for the currency if there is any possible ambiguity in the context. ...



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