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If you are not already using row colours to provide information, perhaps you could use multiple shades of one colour to indicate freshness. The less fresh (riper? I concur with Jayfang, freshness seems a little counter-intuitive here) a question is the stronger/bolder the colour is to draw the user's attention to that question. Conversely, the fresher a ...


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Consider changing the concept. "Freshness" is generally seen as a positive - how can something be "too fresh"? It's not a natural concept for most users. Consider an aged product like wine or cheese "too fresh" is not really used. Rather the concepts are "not ready", "not optimal", "cellar for a while", "ready at " If the system concepts better match ...


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Suggestion 1: Use the checkbox space? If I understand correctly, when items are fresh, they can't be checked & send to other users, so you will not need a checkbox on those, or have the checkbox greyed out? Can you not use that space then to indicate 'freshness'? A light, greyed out circle containing the item's 'freshnesh' in days (eg 24d) or weeks ...


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From what I gathered from the comments, let me make an assumptions to the application: -The list of documents will not be modified frequently. Besides initial configuration, an administrator will not be using/modifying the list frequently. Also, this answer is based off of the layout of the page/actions (as that is what I believe you are asking), not the ...


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Is a 'dataheavy' table one with lots of columns, rows or both? I would suggest that it is the design of the table that creates the cognitive strain, causing difficulties in reading and processing the information. Well presented tables are easy to read and interpret regardless of the amount of information it contains. Of course, if you simply wanted to ...


2

Remember that "color blindness" is not the complete absence of color. That is called Achromatopsia and it is only seen in 1 in every 33,000 people. What humans typically suffer from is a deficiency in the development of the cones in the eyes, making it difficult to decipher differences in colors such as red and green, or blue and green. As mentioned above, ...


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Here are some suggestions I leaned for designing a scheduling system based off of a gantt chart for a large client in St. Louis. Modes - possibly a drop down selector A everything mode because the user wants to see items in context with one another. If your icons do not fit then I suggest using a hover state for the smaller times. Modes that allow the ...


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You can use hashing, for example :


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A table is a two-dimensional structure. The problem is that you are trying to display more than two dimensions of data in a single table. There is no intuitive way to do that. The best solution is probably: Summarize information displayed in this table to what is most important to view at a high level. I don't know what the correct summary is for your ...


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Colors are not going to be a good way to distinguish 15-20 activities, period. There are too many, and colors will look similar. Besides the very good points made by Henrik Ekblom,: I would display the activity name or the first part of it whenever there is room. If there is a tooltip feature such as mouse-over (not clear if this is a desktop ...


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Maybe you can solve the problem with this table view. But there are a handicap, if there are too many records would not be a useful table representation.


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To start with it's a good idea not to solely rely upon colors (because of color blindness). Colors can maybe still be kept, if they in the gray scale will result in different gray shades - which can help the user to scan the area. Selecting Activity 1 could highlight all Activity 1 areas in the schedule. Add an abbreviation of what activity each block is. ...


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A huge con of grouping data is that groups will overrule sorting rules. For example, if you sort on DR DESC now the person with the green 8 will be shown on top right? However, when you have more data and sort while grouped, it will show the group in which you have a person with the highest score, at least that is what I would expect. Another person with the ...


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Benefits of the first solution: Users can easily sort by first name. (*) You can have incomplete data (first or last name only). If you would have incomplete data in the second solution, it might not be clear if something is a first or last name. Benefits of the second solution: Works for every name (not everyone’s name is of the form first last). ...


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My recommendation would be something along these lines. Obviously, this is just a mock and you may want to do different things in terms of sizing, shading, and things like that. I think this makes sense because you have risks that are global, one-time type risks. Below that, you have phases which are visual descendants of the event and they have their own ...


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Tabular data is traditionally difficult to read this becomes even more of an issue when additional layers of complecity are added in. I would suggest to look at the basic information you would like to convey and move away from tabular data (if your design efforts are not constrained of course) Based on my undertanding the main building blocks are : A- ...


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The idea is given multiple times, but none of them provides for the need for top level risks. I also wanted to show that it can be perfectly done in a more classic style table.


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You basically have two tables, you can let users to explore the data relationships. You click on an event and see the associated risks. Or you click a risk and see the relevant events. In the mockup the user has selected the second risk from the top, and the two associated events on the left are marked with a [v]. Of course the highlight should be more ...


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How about this for a starting point for discussion? It's still table-based, but I think it communicates the ideas you're trying to get across. Have a think about some more challenging scenarios and let me know if you think something like this has legs. I'd be happy to evolve the idea with you.


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I created a wireframe to show the way I imagine to you. If you visualize items and their attributes, you help user to understand and use your UI in a good way. When user opens indicated page it is good if he/she sees the general view of your risks, events and risk owners. When user wants go further to see details then you popup a simple window on mouse ...


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Present the risk/event relationship as a two-dimensional table You have presented the problem as one of cross-reference, therefore you should solve it by presenting the data in a cross-reference format. A simple table with descriptors of each event and risk will directly connect the two for your users. Checkmarks or some other indicator token can indicate ...


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Have you considered using Sprint management tools for user stories as best in practice examples? http://www.jetbrains.com/youtrack/ and https://sprint.ly/ work these kind of tasks quite well


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If you can fit the information, I think a table would be much better because 1. it makes visually scanning the list easier. When the user has to jump over elments, borders, white space etc. to see the short description, it takes more effort and time. 2. You can fit more records in one page so the user needs to scroll less. 3. You can use inline filters - ...



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