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What about radar charts? One application of radar charts is the control of quality improvement to display the performance metrics of any ongoing program. They are also being used in sports to chart players' strengths and weaknesses, where they are usually called spider charts. Here's a nice example.


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This is a pretty difficult question to answer, so I think the best thing is to give you some ideas to think about. The process of designing interfaces for the purpose of data visualization is a whole subject area in itself, although you'll find plenty of good areas to start with from the likes of Edward Tufte and Stephen Few. So some areas you want to ...


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You may want to try looking at Tableau. I've used their desktop app (free trial) and they have some really nice data visualization tools. You could also check out extjs. They are not as visually compelling out of the box, but they have a lot of nice sorting and filtering tools that you can use. Another paid option is Infragistics, who makes UI widgets. ...


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I like your second solution better because: Office locations are consolidated into one column for one person. This reinforces the notion that the person works out of multiple offices. Out of the possible offices, there must be a main office and sorting by the main office makes sense One idea you could consider is allowing user to have the option to ...


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The Summary grid should have different UI colors giving it a look of inactive thing. The Summary grid displays the actual grid's data, so 'Clear' option will go only with actual grid.


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Just use the text "Today". As a "badge" style is no harm either. e.g. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups The principle is always to match the users mental model.


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After much soul-searching and many mock-up screenshots, I have to agree with funkylaundry that more than a single button on the same side of a navigation bar looks non-standard in an iOS application. Thus, I decided to stick with Apple's idea of a functionality-bound "Add..." row inside a table view, in a separate "+" section at the bottom of it (which ...


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Regarding the data in the column : As previously answered, numerical data should be right aligned if their values need to be visually comparable as this aligment reveals the order relation (as opposed to an alphabetical ordering) because left-positioned zeros are implicit. Regarding the column headers : A column header is an indication about the content ...


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Usually, you would only align pure numbers right, so you could compare them easily.


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It depends on the meaning of the data. As a general rule, if the user will be comparing values for their size, or scanning for a value that looks big or small, then you should right align the value to help with this. Prices should therefore be right aligned. Phone numbers on the other hand will not be compared for value, so they don't need to be.


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It is a bit tricky without the context - a sketch would help, but in general I would not recommend having three buttons in the navigation bar. Partly because it might take up too much space, depending on how you are planning to design the buttons and partly because it would "feel" inconsistent according to the UI guidelines. If I should choose between your ...


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I often use dynamic striping, i.e. alternatively white and light green, while the entire line the cursor is on is light yellow. My tables tend to be rather wide :-)


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My answer is one you might already have thought of but I want to share what I did when I ran into the same problem. I conlcuded that zebra striping doesn’t really solve anything but is just a way to make things a bit clearer and is also often used to make tables less boring to look at. They can be useful for two things: to be able to oversee a long row ...


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I agree that zebra stripes probably are more of a liability than help in this situation. But note that zebra stripes are but just one way to ensure a solid horizontal division between rows. It's also important to note that the evidence that they improve things isn't by any means conclusive. As the article mentions, there's some evidence it helps, but context ...


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Zebra stripes prevent parallax errors when reading grid rows. You just need every other row too look different. What about giving dragged rows a 3rd colour? Once you save the changes you can re-stripe the rows.


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It depends As a web developer, I decide according to the data a particular table holds. Now why do I decide according to the data the element holds? Say for example I am having a list of messages rendered in a tabular form, I tend to highlight rows for the messages say that are unread, or say I've another table with tasks listed, so I highlight the tasks ...


2

Note that zebra-striping evolved as a way of helping users read tables on paper. If you've got the data in a computer, you can use dynamic highlighting, filtering, or other mechanisms to help users see how rows/columns are associated. (Or, of course, pull the data out of a table entirely and present it in some more useful form.) Also note that even in ...


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It depends on your definition of "better", but whether you define user performance or user preference as your metric, there are studies that objectively measure zebra striping (which can be done in more than one way). A study was done in 2008 that looked at how effective zebra striping is on tables, and it drew some interesting conclusions. The study ...


0

If I understand correctly, when pressing "show codes" you'll only see the codes associated with that particular user. Therefor, displaying the name of the user is superfluous. Showing the codes in a table and then showing the codes again in a textfield for the second time is superfluous too. My suggestion would be for a row of input fields for every code. ...


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For your use case with 10+ athletes by 9 events, the full table might not fit on mobile screens. Generally you want to avoid scrolling left-right but scrolling up/down is OK. Swiping left right or using tabs for each event is a good option if all of your data doesn't fit from left to right beside the athlete names. You could use tabs or swipe gestures to ...


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I agree with Steppenwolf above that we need to know more about your use cases and context to make a truly informed recommendation. But I am not sure I agree about hiding the "add new item" feature. From my perspective, you are displaying a list for the user. The user can view that list, and perhaps look at individual line items on the list by touching one. ...



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