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5

A fairly standard method of indicating "extra information available" is with a dashed or dotted underline. This may change the cursor to a "Help" cursor, which might look something like this: ...which would allow a click to bring up additional information. One method I use is a dotted underline with a popup on mouseover, which (with some styling) looks ...


3

I recently designed a calendar which may give you some ideas so I thought I'd share a demo link... Calendar of Events 1. It conveys quite a bit of information and still works on mobile 2. It expands vertically when a day is clicked showing additional event details 3. It could potentially support more than 4 event types


3

If data is important for the users to know, I suggest you not to use hover. Use a modal with the details. And if you want user to click place a text down the table "Click on items to view more info." Text can be put on hover also but on hover he couldn't able copy text, say if he wants to do for some reason. You can also use a small icon of "i" for more ...


3

I guess that comment is an answer Don't make the user guess with vague, systems-centric labels like "state". If the switch represents turning policy enforcement on or off: Enforce policy


2

I prefer a more controlled approach to sorting or re-ordering. I would prefer to have different sort options, like "sort by date", "sort by name", sort by priority". The "fling" gesture looks to me like discarding the item. If you could animate the movement of the item that has been moved, and show the user where it has ended up, then it might be helpful. ...


2

I've taken your two important statements about what the user is most likely to do and put them in a simple dashboard: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups If these are the 2 most important things, I think it's important to seperate them from the cluster of other data that is available (progressive disclosure). The ...


2

Showing just the day and the next-soonest event. This is just showing 8 datapoints, which could be shown with 4 relatively small elements: Showing each day/event This is going to be tricky to compress. It's 12, almost 50 datapoints. More if you insist on listing dates. What you have is already pretty small and close to the smallest legible solution. It ...


2

There is no such thing as website exclusively built for the blind or handicapped. In fact by creating a separate website, you are indirectly isolating these people with disabilities and defeats the purpose of web accessibility. A good design/coding should be inclusive and be able to meet everybody's needs. You cannot "Tab" through the radio buttons ...


2

It sounds like your users are entering data in bulk. I notice that this type of user tend to prefer to collate information in a spreadsheet before they enter it into any record editing UI (perhaps they even have their own Excel macros). If this is the case, I would recommend supporting copy / paste for rows and columns, and / or some kind of import (csv ...


1

Additional Menu One of the main sources of potential confusion here is that an individual hyphen in a cell can end up a long way from the icon in the menu bar that lets the user know what it's for. Showing the same menu bar when the user expands a section could alleviate this. 'Frozen Row' or 'Sticky' Menu You might also consider replicating the ...


1

Personally, I don't think you need to highlight plans by their speed as the table is rather easy to follow. But I do have the following comments: Do you really have plans with speeds ranging from KB/s to GB/s? If not, I would really try to settle on a consistent unit of measurement across all of them. If possible, I would make the table sortable by the ...


1

The trend I've seen of late is to place the edit button as close as possible to the thing you're editing (but only when you're focused on the element). There's at least a few web apps I use that I can think of where hovering over a field presents a pencil icon, and from there I can click or double-click to modify the value for that one field. Obviously, the ...


1

It depends whether your users are entering large change sets, or are making small one-off changes. I have previously developed a table that had an "edit mode" that you had to switch on. Once in edit mode all the editable fields of the selected row became text fields, so it was obvious which content you could change. Changed fields were highlighted in green, ...


1

I'll summarize what I think has been a very productive set of discussions and answers, and it will hopefully help you come up with an appropriate solution for your problem: Context: consider exactly how someone is going to use the information and perhaps also on what kind of device, because this will give you important design constraints that you'll be ...


1

Few things before the solution. The solution should address not just the UX but also the UI. You can probably check material design for how a table can be shown and where can the actionable items be placed. https://www.google.com/design/spec/components/data-tables.html Now, coming to an approach, What should be the ideal placement of elements above the ...



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