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31

It is difficult to find supportive evidence for this question. From what I've read about Philip Olsson's pictograms (some starting points are here and here), I would say that it, like the other media control symbols, represents movement, and in the case of Eject, the movement is upward, out of the horizontal flow of the media timeline. The bottom rectangle ...


27

The international standard ISO 8601 specifies a notation that uses the slash “/” between dates expressed in the year-month-day notation, e.g. 2014-07-15/2015-08-01 This is the only reasonable globalized notation. But it should normally be used only a) internally in data representation when a date range needs to be represented as one string and b) as the ...


20

Oh you really nailed it with this question. So, I could say the star is better because Google uses it for "starring" in all of its products (think Gmail, Google Bookmarks, search results, etc). But at the same time, Amazon uses it for ratings and so do dozens of other web properties. So when you see a single star, what does that suggest to you? Then there's ...


15

Not really. As Tommy says, * often means it has been changed. r and w are common technical characters in context of being readable and writable. > can be used in context of a menu, or moving forward, or perhaps to 'move on' to an action but that action could be anything , so it's meaning would really not be clear other than by experimentation. In ...


15

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hashtag Hashtags are mostly used as unmoderated ad-hoc discussion forums; any combination of characters led by a hash sign is a hashtag, and any hashtag, if promoted by enough individuals, can "trend" and attract more individual users to discussion using the hashtag. The tag you are talking of in this context is a ...


14

The first part of your question, Why Does “X” Represent the Unknown?, can be answered quickly from this short TED talk. In short, we use "x" to represent the unknown because the scholars in 11th century couldn't translate the arabic letter "Shin", denoting unknowns, to Spanish. In Arabic, Shin (ش‎) is read as /ʃ/, like the sound sh in shoe, but there is no ...


13

The critical factor here is that the task is repetitive, so it needs to be as simple and quick as possible, with bigger target areas. I think it's a good idea to keep with lots of buttons. One vehicle, one action - nice and simple. Move the buttons a bit further apart to avoid accidentally hitting the wrong one and make them bigger so there's less room for ...


12

My thoughts: In Switzerland, where multi-language websites are very common, the normal thing is to use the two letter language codes (DE, FR, EN, IT etc.) or - if there is enough space - use the full name (i.e. Deutsch, Français, English etc.). But I think key for a good experience is how the language detection is handled. IMO it should work like this: ...


11

I think it's better to put n-dash symbol (U+2013) without spaces on sides. This is typographically right. There is no strict rules about it so you are free to use western tradition. What is the difference between dash and n-dash, you can read here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dash


10

If it is change in terms of editing something, I would say a pencil. This is an incredibly common icon for edit.


10

I think you mean, does a user recognize the religion based on the symbols? If it's shown to a general audience, the answer is No. Well atleast I don't. The name of the religion is needed below the image imho. The extra text adds minimal amounts in terms of UI, but could potentially make things clear for a large audience. after the edit to the question I ...


10

I would suggest using a megaphone icon, since it is easily identified as a metaphor for "speaking out" understood independent of age and cultural background of the intended audience non-biasing towards positive or negative feedback.


10

Would it be possible to approach the problem in a different way? Instead of asking questions where the user decides just yes or no, make them state their choice by affirming text. For example, instead of: Does a pilot's license require the applicant to know the complete rulebook? [Yes] [No] use: A pilot's license requires the applicant to know [the ...


9

The heart can mistaken for "Like" and the star can be mistaken for rating. Usually it's better to have a word next to icons (at least on the main view / page). soundcloud.com does it like that: On their page it says "save to favorites" next to the heart (or "remove from favorites" when already added). On their apps (Mac OS and iOS) they only use the heart ...


9

The closest to a standard symbol for edit is ✎, but that is by no means universally understood. I would suggest using an Edit button instead.


8

There are some Unicode characters you could use. "Lower Right Pencil" (✎ in HTML) or "Writing Hand" (✍). They look like this: ✎ ✍ You could try using different Unicode fonts or font sizes to make them look nicer.


8

I would argue that the relevance stems from the mechanical nature of the earlier uses. Specifically, many tape and video cassette machines historically used top loading cassettes (e.g. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Nordemende_spectra_V100.jpg and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:RadioShack-ctr-119.jpg). The eject symbol therefore seems reasonably to be ...


7

So you need an association of an object (the course - a document) with a person (the user) and a state (allocation)? We have no idea of size of icon you need so I'm going to make it nice and big!


7

I understood the faith references, but did not immediately relate them to the relevant texts. The problem is that they relate more significantly to the faith than the book. In particular, the fish for Christianity ( and while it is a recognised symbol within the Christian community, I do not think it is so widely recognised outside ) would relate to the ...


7

Jews do not call their religious books the “Old Testament”, for reasons which should be obvious if you stop to think about it. They use the name Tanakh (this is the same set of texts as the Christian Old Testament, but in a different order). Christians consider both the Old and the New testaments to be inspired scripture, though they may pay more attention ...


7

I’d go with graphical animations of corresponding gestures. In most cultures this would probably be a head shake and a nod: Shaking to indicate "no" is widespread, and appears in a large number of diverse cultural and linguistic groups. Areas in which head shaking generally takes this meaning include Indian subcontinent, Middle East, Africa, Southeast ...


6

As a set of rough rules for symbols in buttons: An arrow or '>' symbol helps signify that a user will move, usually to a new webpage A 'plus' icon always suggests adding something to an existing thing - such as a new feed to an RSS reader, for example Stars usually indicate 'favourite' systems. Users clicking stars expect to stay on your site, just to have ...


6

I'm partial to the speech bubble. Seems to suggest that a user would be starting a conversation without indicating whether the feedback should be positive or negative.


6

What you are describing is standard wildcard functionality, so you could append a * to the end of the start string (which is nice and standard); or perhaps + which could be fairly intuitive; or even % which is used by various flavours of SQL. As well as the Regular Expression ^ as described by Ben Brocka (which would go at the start of the string). I don't ...


6

You can use the exclamation mark without the triangle. It suggests that you need to pay some more attention and is milder than a straight out red X. Also, rather than phrasing it as, satisfactory, you can say that their current score is acceptable, but, with a bit more effort they can do much better. Rather than a warning, you are treating it as a call ...


6

I think the symbol idea you've presented in Option 2 can work well. Depending on the ease of traversal through levels though, you may not want to change the symbol for every level. For example, if there isn't great difficulty between levels 41-50, maybe they can all be represented by the same symbol. And possibly with that, when the game ends, you can ...


6

Way back in the mists of time, recordable media came on spools and were hand-threaded through the works of the device. Mistakes were nasty - 100 meters of 1/4 inch tape on the floor takes a LONG time to wind up again (Very easy to do - change from fast-wind to play without slowing the reels down. Inertia will handle the rest). The self-contained cassette ...


5

Icons on buttons - phew - where to start. I don't want to get deeply into this but I guess the main factor is that a good icon is more easily recognized than the text, especially once it has been 'learned and associated', and therefore a user hardly even has to try and read the text in order to know what the button does. The icon should be indicative of ...


5

Dreamhost does a nice job of this. I think their simple dropdown options are well written and say a lot. The key factors are that they try to capture 1) your mood, and 2) your level of expertise. If a newbie is freaking out and mad, they feel more urgency than a sysadmin who needs a reset, even though the sysadmin may have bigger problems in the grand ...


5

I would say it depends on the context of your application. Facebook and twitter use the thumbs up icon to denote an appreciation while the heart icon is used to convey a more "cute" emotion. You also have to realize that tumblr and instagram have generally a younger population as compared to the diverse user group of Fb and you tube. User base of tumblr ...



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