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1

Sorry to use the Answer function, but I can't add comments yet. It's not clear from your question what platforms you're designing for, but assuming that you're designing for at least both iOS and Android I think you will have useability issues with the first option. For example, swiping from the top right on an iOS device is likely to trigger the ...


2

I would consider using three vertical lines like so: You can read in this other question on UX.SE about how these lines are typically used to represent pullable/draggable areas and why: What do 3 *close* horizontal bars (not the hamburger menu) represent UX-wise, and what's the origin of the design? It is a skeumorphic depiction of notching, ...


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Dont! Swipeable things are in design meant to shorten quick interactions which are listed in a table view All the things you have displayed here can be easily put on the card itself Besides the point: facebook and twitter make sense, hand doesnt. I have no idea what it does This is how it should look, and be used. Its like using a slidebar to enter ...


2

I found an article which was published on February 20, 2012 written by Jason Mick (blogger) "Neonode Patented Swipe-to-Unlock 3 Years Before Apple" Neonode -- a small Swedish phone manufacturer was the first to deploy the technology commercially.  And it also appears to be the first to have patented swipe-to-unlock. U.S. Patent No. 8,095,879. The ...


3

The gesture goes back at least to 2009, when it was already being used by Apple and Google, and especially Palm (webOS). I Googled ‘swipe to delete’ and restricted the results to pre-2010. I learned that the iPhone had it in Mail, while Gmail’s mobile app had ‘swipe to archive’. But, as far as I can tell, swipe-to-perform-an-action was used most extensively ...



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