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9

In general, SUS seems to be okay for web sites. Tullis and Stetson compared it with other usability surveys in assessing a corporate intranet, and SUS outperformed the others. It sounds like a couple certain individual items may not be applicable for your work. To check for this systematically, create a correlation matrix of your item responses and ...


7

Comparing usability between systems (or within different versions of the same system) is explicitly the point of the System Usability Scale. The point of SUS scores is that they're fairly vague, and since you're supposed to be comparing generally similar systems (why would you be comparing dissimilar systems?), they can be a quick and dirty way to get some ...


7

The System Usability Scale is mainly intended for a comparison between like systems. It's very general to allow it to compare systems, and it gives an easy reference point. It's generally assumed that the products you are comparing have similar use cases, which mitigates the problem of some questions not applying. Comparing mortgage payment sites the ...


6

A success rate is one of many metrics used for measuring/quantifying usability. As http://www.measuringusability.com/blog/essential-metrics.php describes, if a task can not be completed, the product is not usable. "If users cannot accomplish their goals, not much else matters." The methods used for determine success rate will vary greatly depending upon: ...


6

I looked for one myself some time ago and couldn't find anything. The thing is that the SUS was released as a free “quick and dirty” scale and nobody “owns” it in the way the Human Factors Research Group at UCC controls the SUMI. Perhaps more importantly, there are now quite some published data on the English-language version of the SUS and its ...


5

I just looked at http://isitjustme.de/2012/01/crowdsourcing-the-translation-of-sus/ users user13154 recommendation. It seems that the effort was picked up by SAP and there is a professionally translated and verified version at http://www.sapdesignguild.org/resources/sus.asp Ich denke, dass ich das System gerne häufig benutzen würde. Ich fand das System ...


5

The take-home I get from Bangor, Kortun, & Miller (2009) that you cite in your comment is that there’s not much difference at least in the categories they used –all averaged in the 66-76 range, while individual product scores ranged from 30 to 94. With the quartile scores Bangor et al provide, you can convert a score you have into a percentile by making ...


4

In this type of questionnaires, the statements (called “items” in the technical literature) are not chosen mainly because they describe what usability is but because they are affected by it (i.e. the question is not “how does this affect usability” but “how does usability affect this”) and the ratings are correlated together. For the SUS, they were ...


4

For me it's a swings and roundabouts discussion. Each has some advantages and disadvantages. Here are some pointers to some research / background that should help you decide between them: A comparison of current approaches to usability measurement. SUS: A Retrospective A Comparison of Questionnaires for Assessing Website Usability (and if you go for SUS ...


3

You need to set your business goals and based on that you can set you ways to measure the success. Think about an e-commerce site, or think about a social network. The goals of the business will be completely different, i.e. % abandoned baskets, conversion, etc. Tools like Google analytics help to make sure you are able to constantly monitor the site and ...


3

There are the SUMI and WAMMI from University College Cork (http://www.ucc.ie/hfrg/questionnaires/index.html). They require a fee for use and are longer than the SUS.


3

You can find the version that we use here: http://minds.coremedia.com/2013/09/18/sus-scale-an-improved-german-translation-questionnaire/ In the development of the German version of the scale, we analyzed and included the other sources mentioned in earlier posts and eliminated a problem with one item. The scale was used with > 80 participants, without any ...


2

Building on Jørn's answer: statistical analyses can help you compare a small group of high-quality users with the rest. Which tests are most appropriate will depend on your sample size and on the asssumptions you can safely make about the nature of your data (such as normally distributed, equal variances, etc.). To compare the scores of two groups on the ...


2

On the contrary, all research emphasized how important it is to use the actual user group in your test and not the contractor or leadership. Despite this, I believe that your planned studies are better than nothing. Every usability specialist has some kind of "quick and dirty testing"-advice or "do it yourself"-advice. And these advices do usually include ...


2

You can have several levels of "success rate", but in essence it's a matter of saying "yes" or "no" to this question: "Did the user accomplich the task?" Quote from the book, p65: To measure task success, each task [...] must have a clear end-state. It's similar to "effectiveness" in the ISO 9241-11 definition...


2

Both printed and digital documents can be evaluated for usability, in the sense that you can define metrics that gauge just how easy it is to use the document. There are also overlaps between the use of colour/contrast, typography and information architecture that are relevant, although you have to adjust it for the type of content, which is a static ...


2

System Usability Scale questions I think that I would like to use this system frequently. I found the system unnecessarily complex. I thought the system was easy to use. I think that I would need the support of a technical person to be able to use this system. I found the various functions in this system were well integrated. I thought ...


2

The ten questions of SUS are not "quite a lot to ask" if you only administer the SUS questionnaire once at the end of all the tasks (which is how it's meant to be used). The thing with the SUS is that although there are 10 questions, they all fit the same basic format ("here is a statement, and a 5 point scale of strongly-agree to strongly-disagree"), and ...


2

Jim Lewis wrote an article in 2012 for Measuring Usability The article explains the direct correlation found between SUS scores and Net Promoter Scores (NPS). They found that it was possible to predict NPS scores based on SUS scores, which means the inverse is also true. The Net Promoter Score is a widely used survey which consists of only one question. ...


1

My question is this: How much margin, if any, should I allow for and where in the calculation should I add it? An error bar makes no sense for individual SUS scores. Presenting grouped average scores then displaying a standard deviation for each group would be sensible. If you're worried about the audience for the results reading too much into small ...


1

Because SUS works very well and has been examined closely practitioners for more than 25 years. The SUS questions weren't pulled out of a hat. They were research based. To somewhat extensively quote from Brooke's original paper: SUS is a Likert scale. It is often assumed that a Likert scale is simply one based on forced-choice questions, where a ...


1

In Germany these two questionaires are used (and I think known in usability circles): AttrakDif UEQ I'll cite from my answer here: http://ux.stackexchange.com/a/72905/3311 : AttrakDif The AttrakDiffTM questionnaire by Hassenzahl et al. (2003), developed together with User Interface Design GmbH, measures subjective assessments concerning ...


1

As others have mentioned, picking a few questions at random from SUS isn't going to give you something that you can usefully use as a guideline. If you're interested in specific factors then I'd take a look at Lewis & Sauro's paper on The Factor Structure of the System Usability Scale where they've done a bunch of research around that topic. That may ...


1

You can't really. Full SUS scores depend upon all of the questions being asked. I guess you could use the standard calculations to give yourself a partial score...but that wouldn't really have much scientific worth at all. You need the full set for a proper SUS score calculation.


1

You seem to be implying that you will be surveying current users for the current system, and this is likely to be problematic beyond the mere appropriateness of the survey questions. A basic principle in research (which is what you are doing) is that, for a valid comparison of two things, everything else has to be the same other than what you are comparing. ...


1

@Jayfang : I think that I would like to use eBill frequently to verify my expenses. I found this eBill unnecessarily complex. I thought this eBill was easy to use. I think that I would need professional support to use this eBill in order to verify my expenses (analyze). I found the various parts in this eBill were well integrated. I thought there was too ...


1

SUS has been shown to work well with isolated parts of the system - i.e. you can re-define the "system" being surveyed as "the eBill". However if the phrasing of a question causes significant doubt about a valid answer, then that is likely to skew the results. So take look at the questions individually I think that I would like to use this system ...


1

André is right. I found a Portuguese one for you: http://meiert.com/en/blog/20091127/sus-how-to-grade/ (near the bottom of post, in updates). There's also a good chance that you are seeing references to versions of the SUS that the researchers themselves have translated.



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