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Jim Lewis wrote an article in 2012 for Measuring Usability The article explains the direct correlation found between SUS scores and Net Promoter Scores (NPS). They found that it was possible to predict NPS scores based on SUS scores, which means the inverse is also true. The Net Promoter Score is a widely used survey which consists of only one question. ...


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In Germany these two questionaires are used (and I think known in usability circles): AttrakDif UEQ I'll cite from my answer here: http://ux.stackexchange.com/a/72905/3311 : AttrakDif The AttrakDiffTM questionnaire by Hassenzahl et al. (2003), developed together with User Interface Design GmbH, measures subjective assessments concerning ...


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There are the SUMI and WAMMI from University College Cork (http://www.ucc.ie/hfrg/questionnaires/index.html). They require a fee for use and are longer than the SUS.


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User feedback surveys, when presented online, are for the most part purely business requirements and not in any way a benefit to UX in general. Quite the contrary, actually, as they are often an annoyance and get in the way for the user. In every user test I've been in on a site that uses Foresee, there's usually many comments along the line of "the survey ...


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Imagine you were shopping and whenever you tried to leave a store, one of the sales people blocked your way until you had told them that you weren't interested in what the store had to offer and were sure that you wanted to leave. That is the real world equivalent of popping anything up when a user tries to leave a site. The one exception is if the person ...


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I feel that what you're asking is a best practise for a UX Dark Pattern. With someone leaving the site, we should not be annoying them to register to a newsletter. It can leave a very bad impression on your users, especially the ones who did not find the site helpful. Discounts, Surveys and Newsletter can all be part of the page as a bonus. With that said, ...


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Consider adding a callout panel on the top of the page, asking users to fill a survey about how they enjoy your website. All three options you suggested would be annoying and discourage the user from actually giving you any feedback.


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I fully agree with dan's answer, just to answer your questions though. I would be hesitant to change the wording of the survey from test to test. We'll be introducing another source of variance from the different tenses. It might make sense to preface all the questions in the survey with "Imagine you are a new user of this system" to avoid the "this is my ...



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