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I wouldn't say it differs at all -- all the standard methods seem appropriate: social media, craigslist, ads, recruiting agencies, local groups, etc. If you can't offer them anything in return, it might be a bit harder, but then you can also play the charity card and motivate people by letting them know they're doing a good deed and that it will have actual ...


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From the usability perspective, the first set is quite universal and is obviously valid in almost every format but if you are on a verge of making a product which requires user's attention then you have to make sure that instead of asking straight questions, you are communicating with the user. Like in this example it feels like you are actually ...


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From the point of view of a user, I would prefer the first set of questions. Why?Simple, because it is concise and straightforward. Consider a form that has 15 or 20 such questions. As a user, I will be reluctant to sit and read the entire sentence, at a stretch and fill the form accordingly. As a result, I'll try to scan through the pivotal word in the ...


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I loved the answer about the relationship between invoking emotional responses and brain-waves/color frequencies. Very cool and technical!! The colors you want to include depend on your product/objectives. There are billions of colors and combinations, but if you are completely new to color psychology, theory, and terminology... this is a good beginner's ...


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It will all depend on the kind of survey. It's not the same to use a survey to find out reasons for abandonment of a product/service than a survey looking to research on a product to be launched. It's not the same an online survey than an "on location" survey (for example, a survey ran on an UX lab, or hallmark testing). However, as different as surveys can ...



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