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Let's assume your primary goal is to figure out priorities for future development, e.g. in corporate environment (as opposed to making the survey as easy to complete as possible with a 5-star system, e.g. for a game on mobile): Then you need 4 pieces of information about each feature: from logs, not from survey: what did the user do with the application ...


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Regarding the question, "In particular...is there anything which produces somewhat similarly reliable results with fewer questions?" You should take a look at the published research on the Usability Metric for User Experience, published by Finstad (2010). The UMUX has four items and has typically been found to have desirable psychometric properties and to ...


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It really boils down to this: what's the goal of asking them the questions? What are you going to do with the resulting data? If you're still at the stage of asking which questions you should be asking, you haven't thought that part through yet; once you've figured out why you're doing an exit survey, the what should fall into place naturally. Is it ...


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If I recall other cancellation surveys, they tend to ask just one question: "Why did you unsubscribe?" With a small handful of possible answers.


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1 - Apply the golden rule of 'surveys' - Don't ask too many questions - In this context of someone walking away from a service I wouldn't try to ask more than say 3 questions with check boxes. You can test this as well. Start with 3. Then try 6 options and see if your completion rate goes up or down. 2 - Think of your questions and then test them on ...



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