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31

I agree with @Jayfang's comment, what does "Doesn't Matter" mean? I think your dilemma is that Doesn't Matter could represent both the middle ground, or just that the user doesn't know. Split them out like this: Very Secure | Secure | Average | Insecure | Very Insecure | No Opinion


22

No, just use the label for what is expected. It's easier to understand and clearer to the user if you use fewer words. Think of a registration form: Enter your e-mail address: or E-mail: From a user experience perspective, the more you cut down on the number of words, the better. Key words are preferred, since they convey the actual meaning to what you ...


19

Place demographic questions at the end of the survey. If you place them at the beginning, you will induce a phenomenon called stereotype threat. Stereotype threat says that if you remind someone of a stereotyped attribute of themselves, it will impact their performance even if they don't believe that stereotype. For example, suppose a girl has heard a ...


13

In my experience, I have gotten better results by combining the survey with the action of unsubscribing. If a user goes to the trouble of unsubscribing from something, they really want to, and are having some sort of negative experience that they want to alleviate. To retain as much goodwill as possible with the customer, let them do what they want -- ...


13

Standard Progressive Disclosure should start at the simplest, least intrusive information first. Maybe even consider allowing users to put off answering some parts of the form (this will probably reduce completion rate of the "extra" fields but increase the completion rate of the start of the survey). But if you must do it all in one go, I'd generally ...


13

I have read up on this a bit, and it seems that my answer will contradict some of the things that have already been mentioned. My sources are all academic, and as such reflect the use of on-line surveys for conducting experiments. Feel free to read the sources that I link to, and draw your own conclusions. I mention some peripheral work as it relates to ...


13

This article cites some studies about it: Some recent research in the Journal of Business and Psychology reveals that placing demographic items at the beginning of a survey increases the response rate to those items in comparison to demographic items placed at the end. And more importantly, it did not affect scores on the three noncognitive ...


12

It is perfectly acceptable for a radio group not to have a default selection if you don't want to influence the user's response (such as in a survey). Microsoft provides this advice in its design guidelines for radio buttons: Don't have a default selection if...The goal is to collect unbiased data. Default values would bias data collection.


8

The reason why you think they are unnecessary is: a) because you are too familiar with the form, and b) overuse of the same verb - 'Enter'. For someone who has never seen the form before, the verb can be a vital clue as to what is expected of them in terms of typing a response, or selecting an option. In order to reduce the repetitive nature and ...


7

Are you asking users to fill in text boxes and write long narratives? If so, this is a high commitment task. Instead, make answering your survey a low commitment task by: Shortening the length of the survey overall--could you limit it to one or two questions, varying questions by user? This would increase participation overall and you could still get all ...


7

Given sufficiently high traffic, you'll be able to get n responses in as short a time as you like. But, that sample is likely to be biased in time and/or geography, especially if you get them within an hour or so. If you only collect responses between 11am and 1pm on a Monday, London time, then you'll be catching a bunch of people from the UK who check ...


7

Don't. Users have goals. Let's say you want to buy a hairdryer. Let's suppose you have some vague idea on what kind of hairdryer you want. You type into Google: "Hairdryer shop" Let's suppose your site comes up first (or second) Instead of diving into hairdryer specifics, there's a popup asking you, "hey, you seem to be new here, we've just opened this ...


7

The list of questions would depend on the product but here are a few general question ideas. How did you learn about product X? Why did you decide to use product X? What were your goals when you started using product X? Did product X meet your expectations related to these goals? What are the the most frequent tasks you do using product X? Explain how ...


7

You could indicate under the selected response the actual value - as in the image below, so that users get immediate (but non blocking) feedback in-place for the response they just selected. If users meant to be very Satisfied they will likely spot the mistake and correct it Also you might try not putting the header in inverse colours as that slightly ...


7

You can use gamification elements to engage users into filling their profiles. One of the examples is engaging users to complete LinkedIn profile: Some gamification tricks for user motivation are: Make form filling meaningful for donors. You could explain why it is so important to fill the form. Provide some kind of PBL (Points-Badges-Leaderboard) as ...


6

Abstract: surveys are annoying your users, and sample bias is worse than sample error. A large sample size isn't as important as an unbiased sample selection. Standard deviation decreases with 1/sqrt(N), so doubling sample size will decrease the sampling error by roughly 30%. So if you need to bother 1000 people to figure out 76% +/- 6% want or are OK ...


6

I did my PhD on how sensitive information is managed in healthcare and in childcares, so this is a very important question. If you are at a University, you must get this passed by your IRB. If anything goes wrong or if information somehow is leaked, then your university is the one who is held liable. If you work for an organization, I also suggest getting ...


6

This actually comes up a lot in my own practice, mainly because feature parity is often highly valued by internal stakeholders. If you've already defined the workflows from interviews and this didn't come up, then you probably need to do two things: 1) make sure the features is/isn't needed and 2) quell the call for the feature. To verify the feature ...


5

Request their email onsite, so that you can send the survey link directly to their inbox. Why should they bother? Make sure to preface the survey with a paragraph about how much you value their feedback, stating explicitly that you want to learn how to deliver a better service to them personally Make all questions optional and make sure the user is aware ...


5

Make it fun to fill out the survey. Most surveys are DEATHLY DULL. I don't know why, but somehow people think this is acceptable. Meanwhile, there are a ton of "What Mad Men Character Are You?" quiz sites out there that are super popular. Why not combine the two? Gather data about your audience while providing entertainment. The NY Times did this last ...


5

Yes, a simple mechanism for feedback can be much more effective than a longer usability survey. The key for understanding this is to consider the time investment that you're asking your users to make when they give you feedback. Almost everyone will be willing to give you a single click of feedback. Almost noone will be willing to spend an hour writing an ...


5

How to decide which chart to use is a topic of greater depth than can be covered here. I suggest reading Tufte's The Visual Display of Quantitative Information. It will cover a lot of elements of conveying information such as: What your chart is meant to communicate How people perceive shapes and lines in graphs Some comparisons between effective displays ...


5

I think visually distinctive on the right would make the most sense. To me, it's an alternative to the other answers on the question. I wouldn't recommend placing it in the middle, because if someone doesn't have an opinion about something, you shouldn't count it as neutral (because neutral is an actual opinion).


4

I think this is more a question of survey design than analysis. From what you say, answers given were average throughout. If you were to run the survey again, you could include questions with more free-text answers inviting more detailed responses, provide rating scales with less opportunity for 'average' responses (e.g. 4 point scales rather than 5 point ...


4

This isn't always easy and you will most likely have to adapt whatever practice you decide on to fit your specific situation. If you're unable to observe people, or you're experimenting to learn about how to capture the right information, surveys can help you gain an initial understanding. The biggest problem with asking people why they do something is ...


4

There is evidence that asking for personal data at the end of a long sign up form or at the end of a test improves conversion rates, but this is somewhat obvious as the person has by that point invested time into it. This situation is also affected by the person wanting something that they will achieve by giving the information. A survey is rather ...


4

I would suggest you would ask the user to give their personal information before the survey. Another way to do it is to let them know that there is a form at the end of the survey that they can choose to fill out and win something. Let them know that the form is not mandatory. An honest interface is very important if you want your customers to enjoy their ...


4

Don't use a popup survey unless it if for critical information and you have no another way of getting it. And there are negligible situations where this is the actual case. You are essentially doing something that hurts UX, in order to find out some information about your UX. The best way to do this is to sit down with some potential users and do a proper ...


4

There is a nice article by Seth how you use pie charts vs bar charts. Pie charts contain less data, but are there to state something obvious: In this graph, Trolls are almost the same size as the rest! But the bar chart shows you more data, where you often read from left to right showing less importance the further to the right you are in the chart: ...


4

(a) require low effort on the part of the participant I would use observation, since its a very reliable method and has very low impact on the users. You don't have to interfer in their work, just observe and take notes. If you feel you need to ask a user being observed what she did - go ahead if the timing feels right, if not - wait until a less ...



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