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12

I prefer 'Sentence case' over 'Title Case' because sentence case respects the difference between proper nouns and the other words. I always thought that it was customary in English. In Spanish it is not, we use sentence case, like this traditional argentine newspaper does. This traditional USA newspaper uses Title Case instead. These are language ...


6

You're essentially asking how to design an pamphlet to interrupt someone's attention and get them to read something that they aren't interested in. The answer is that you shouldn't. It's poor UX. If you want people to read a pamphlet, however there are a few things that you can do (outside of the design of the pamphlet) to increase that possibility: ...


6

Would Yahoo! style guide work for you? Here's a few others: Web Style Guide 3.0 Netflex Style Guide Skype Brand Book WebEx Brand Style Guide Android Developer Style Guide


4

My approach to this is completely style-guide oriented. The online Oxford Guide Style states: The general rule is not to use a capital letter unless it is absolutely required. The book itself states: Capitalize the first letter of headings and captions. So it appears Sentence Case is the way to go, event for captions.


3

What you call visual elements are really just the parts that are unique to one application vs. another. The logo, color scheme, and icons are most often unique elements that have to fit into, and often determine to an extent, the style of the website. UI elements are just building blocks that can be used and which are expected to be well known to people ...


3

I dont think this is specific to UX. This is actually a question of knowledge management. There is a whole ecosystem of people/products/services for this kind of thing. Software like Wikis like Confluence, SharePoint, MadCap Flare, Salesforce Sites, Google Docs all are viable options. It depends on your security (and other) requirements. Google: ...


2

Web app style guides are very rare... I've found by a research some time ago a good style guide for web apps. Hope it helps. http://developers.sun.com/docs/web-app-guidelines/uispec4_0/01-introduction.html


2

Working on a styleguide now. It's in HTML, running on a local server. There are several reasons for rendering it on the web: 1. It's very easy to share, navigate and search. 2. You can see interactions and behaviors as they will appear to users. 3. Code snippets -- a styleguide isn't much use to developers, unless you provide the .css, .js and .htm files ...


2

I agree with Aviva Rosenstein that you have to design your deliverables just like you design your projects, by asking questions like: Who's the target audience? What are their needs? What needs to be communicated? What are their goals? For me, I'm increasingly trying to influence our team of developers to adopt best practices/corporate standards. ...


2

Aside from the case that has been made for improved readability, I also argue for sentence case it on the grounds that it's an easier rule to remember for people actually implementing (graphic designers, engineering, writers, etc.). Title case lends itself to all kinds of arbitrary decisions when implementers don't want to be bothered to look up whether ...


2

Title Case for Headings and Buttons It's easier and faster for users if they can to identify the shapes of words. "We recognize words from their word shape." also called the Bouma Shape. Read more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Word_recognition Bouma Shape: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Word_recognition#Bouma_shape A Few Examples ...


2

I have experience of three different tools for creating style guides: Confluence The first style guide I implemented was built using Confluence. It was more a design pattern library, containing patterns and best practices for the most common UI design problems. Each pattern contained an example image, description how it works and why it should be used, and ...


1

Based on my experience of producing a few style guides in various formats (html, wiki, pdf, doc), I found simple static HTML pages provided the most flexibility. It's usually developers who are driving creation of web style guides, because they are the primary beneficiary. Consequently, the burden of creating and maintaining one will likely fall on you ...


1

Title case for buttons. As @juan-lanus suggests "US English is more capitalization-prone than Spanish.". As @bart-gijssens suggests there are no widely followed guidelines for webapps, but with Apple's attention to design and their significant share on mobile, I go with title case (title-style) for buttons as described in both iOS (pdf) and Mac HIG (pdf).


1

For annotating the mockups, it's good to use a tool like specctr, but anything which gives you a new layer is fine. You mentioned that fireworks is not part of your toolset right now (it's a very nice tool), well, specctr is expected to have a photoshop version sooner or later, but on the other side, it's a matter of a few lines. Tools like Microsoft ...


1

I usually use Axure to create UX related documents. It allows you to generate a website very easily and you can also show interactivity of the UI to demonstrate a certain interaction pattern. Everyone can easily access the website and you can also provide a link to a specific page on the site if you want to communicate some specific area. Having an ...



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