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37

Let them change their name. A woman getting married takes the last name of her husband (sometimes), and not allowing her to change her name at a website could translate into a poor experience for her. I'm a big fan of option #1. I had to go look up my ID# here at the UX website to find I'm #5737. Out of sight, out of mind, in a good way. I don't know ...


15

A solution to this some services have used is to have a separate username and display name. Your user name is your portal to the site; what you login as, what your URL is based on (usually), and sometimes how people find you. Twitter is probably the most relevant solution, as they have good SEO but they do have a display name you can change. You can't ...


15

When you have categories, there are often items that don't fit into any category well, and so you are left with a choice between having a category with a single item in it, or a catchall category like 'other'. If the item isn't needed in the first place, then regardless of whether it fits into a category or not, you should not include it. That said, I will ...


14

I just thought of an option 3, which comes in a few parts. I'm probably being excessively verbose, but I want to make sure I've covered every case :) Only allow name changes every so often (three months should be fine to accommodate real name changes like the Jane Smith/Jane Doe examples above). Maintain a columns in the database of the past, say... four ...


11

I think the question you should be asking is what should be my content strategy and how should I define that to drive my site navigation.. That said, there are multiple steps in defining your content strategy : Plan your content: This is the initial phase of any site and should involve the questions such as the objective of the site, the user group which ...


11

I'm not so sure there's a huge difference from a UX stand-point. If anything, it makes it more difficult. Let's say a user is on your site and is at www.sub.example.com/articles/article-title.php, and he wants to go to your homepage. Users often clear the address bar, so he would click in the address bar, clear the end of the URL, and be left at ...


10

I've solved this task using card sorting in a low tech, hands on session with my client and/or users. Write down all menu items onto index cards and let the participants sort the cards in a way they think it is correct. You will find a lot more information on the internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Card_sorting


9

Which one is the main point for each website depends on what strategy best suits their particular interest, product(s), and service(s). There is no universal purpose. Some of the more common purposes for a home page are: A portal entry point to direct you to other content (e.g. youtube) An introduction to your company and what you do (e.g. most ...


9

Organizations are so hung up on deliverables that it turns a proper UX process into a deliverable process instead. Which is bad UX. The ideal is to educate the organization that UX isn't a step in the process with a set of defined deliverables, but rather it is part of the process itself, and the deliverables will change from project to project and even ...


7

I have a Point 3 that is similar to the Point 1, but does not expose the ID of the user (which might give away some information). Instead, I would simply assume that a given username is, at any point in time, held by a single person. Therefore, the url can simply embed the time (or rather, date): http://somewebsite.com/2011-10-05/ausername Then it is ...


7

The mental model attempts to define a map of the user cognitive processes. Depending on how it's done it can help define what is the user looking for, what kind of decisions is she taking etc. In my experience mental models serve more as a framework to refer to as one explores different possibilities. The mental model itself does not deliver specific design ...


6

(tl;dr: Click through the presentation mentioned below to see how the BBC designed their URLs and to learn a bunch of other stuff you probably hadn't thought about much) The best approach to this I've seen is described by the BBC's UX director Mike Atherton in Beyond the Polar Bear (SlideShare). One of his main arguments is the use of domain-driven design, ...


6

Understanding the content To be able to understand the content currently available on the site you can't only rely on the navigation menu, tagging systems or search which is where you start. Get your view of where content lives before you ask the users and editors of content today. You need to interview and observe content editors and content consumers ...


6

Firstly, that is one of the nastiest menus that I have ever seen. I know it's not your work, but this is a fantastic example of what happens when UX is not considered. That said, I can think of no interface that will make a menu with those options usable. You have to deal with the underlying issue, that the category groupings need to change to be able to ...


5

You could make the tab-container as wide as the entire page, and put the column inside the tab (in the shape it is now). Then you can make the content of that column to only contain the items relevant to the tab it is in: Period, Filter, New Employee, Other Offices are shown in the Office Employees tab. Only show Other Offices in the Office Details tab. ...


5

Thematically, a subdirectory is clearly part of the main site. A subdomain is an area that may be related to the main site, but doesn't really fit as part of the main site. There's no hard rules for what goes where, it is dependant on how content/functionality is being organized and who is doing it. The benefit of the subdomain approach is that it can be ...


5

All the examples you have quoted are examples of parallax sites which use shifting content to tell and story and keep the user engaged.I am going to break this response into three parts. The reasoning I would recommend looking at this article for additional inputs on how parallax sites keep users engaged. Storytelling Parallax scrolling offers ...


4

In short: It depends. Option One if it's a less formal/professional site, Option Two if more formal/professional oriented. I like option one. The various user groups I've worked with pay little or no attention to the URL, so unless you know url construction is an issue to your specific user group, I'd go with this. BUT, I have never worked on a site that ...


4

Allow users to change their name, but only once every few months. When they do, the old username should be blocked for a few months as well, so nobody else could use it. When somebody visits a blocked page, a screen should inform the visitor that the user has changed her name, and people should update their bookmarks if they still wish to be able to visit ...


4

As Ben said, UX patterns aren't sacred and they exist for specific scenarios. Avoiding multi-columns is meant to prevent confusion in the path to completion (people zigzagging), in situations like this one: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups In your case you already have strong vertical edges which guide the user, ...


4

In my experience, once you know which tasks your user must complete, you can then define your task flows. With task flows you can figure out which pages you need on your site. You also figure out what goes on each page & how everything is grouped together on the page. Then you can start to define how the various pages are linked together, which ...


4

I have not encountered an issue like that before, but I have encountered a more malicious experience that is similar. We had several websites that were taking our eCommerce product images and linking them to provide product images for their own website. (Hotlinking for those of you who are familiar with the term.) In your case, you have benevolent ...


3

Specifically addressing the need to understand the content, there are two steps you probably need to go through if you haven't already. The first is to do a thorough content audit, so that you're aware of the breadth and depth of the content you're going to need to organise. Navigation solutions are likely to vary dependent on the volume of content you have ...


3

Usually there are client objectives like, "we need to show the following features first", provided in the brief or discussed in workshops. Then there are user objectives, "I want to find out where to buy this", derived from personas based on user research. A balance of these two factors should influence your first attempt at creating a nav. The best way to ...


3

Let them change username - but with some consideration of the caveats below. Permanent tagging with an id like usr12351 is so impersonal in a workplace - it shows a lack of humanity and kind of undermines and undervalues employees by representing them as a cold number rather than a person. I am not a number ('The Prisoner' on Wikipedia) Using an email, ...


3

First of all try grouping the categories. For example study, lessons and courses could be grouped under education with the categories as sub elements You could also use a card sorting task to find logical groups: Card sorting Second: Determine a logical order, for example an alphabetical order (or use your insights from the card sorting task). Third: many ...


2

I think generally it is not a UX issue, rather branding and marketing, but from UX point of view the best should be to have unique domain names for each brand/product. Unique domain name easiest to recall most internet users usually type in 'somthing'.com, when they are looking for official websites Subdomain - the second chance (if you cannot purchase ...


2

Back in '97-98 I helped a major management consulting firm launch their first intranet. We did a lot of stuff wrong, but one thing we got right was the company directory. Each employee entry included a picture, phone number, email address, office location and area of expertise. We also allowed employees to edit their own profiles. Regarding your situation ...


2

Enterprise application users don't like scrolling, and proper information density is critical to their productivity. So there's nothing wrong with your layouts, because it makes good use of white space. I would just be extra careful about the keyboard-tabbing order. For example, in the Products screenshot, you can structure the markup so that users can ...


2

I would suggest doing something like the iOS Mail app. The main screen is the inbox, but you can back up one in the navigation hierarchy to see the list. Just make sure to make it load on your main screen and only switch if you go back and then choose a different option.



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