New answers tagged

1

There have been a lot of studies on keyboard layout in the past 20 years. James Lewis of IBM has performed a lot of them. I was interested because I was in the business of designing mobile phone keyboards. The short answer is that there are two letter arrangements that get good results: alphabetical and QWERTY (or local equivalent). And QWERTY is almost ...


2

While this is quite subjective, there are some guidelines on color based on frameworks or design philosophies. A very common one nowadays is Material Design Colors, which basically uses a primary color, a secondary color, and an accent, mixed with shades and tints. Similarly, Apple Color Guidelines are a must read resource since it has more theory, which in ...


1

The current international standard layouts are all based on the staggered QWERTY type layout - We all recognise it as a keyboard for typing text into - so much so that it's often used as the icon for adding text to something. Dvorak and other standards have gained popularity in recent years but I think we are far from a point where they can be considered ...


5

Here's a part of answer. I'm gonna take a simple example. French language uses a lot of é and è. These characters are located respectively on the 2 key and the 7 key. In fact, there's used so often that, without pressing the shift key, pressing on the 2 or 7 key will print not the number, but the é or è character. This is different from an english ...


1

I believe when I see "UX" in practice that I am reading "A quantified user of my product" not "any random human being." Data based context is so important. The question posed makes me think more of HR, and less of UX. A professional designer should absolutely take into consideration the things you proposed. There are social ethics that many would deem ...


-1

I think the first and foremost thing that we lack is awareness on this topic. As quickly we can take this from awareness to a discourse and have enough people understanding and appreciating it, there is a good chance this will become a framework which people look up to when they talk to there clients or anyone they talk to about design.


4

Short answer I think ethical issues should largely be covered by the standard guidelines etc for each particular product or service. However, I do think it is possible to have some sort of overarching guideline (sort of like the Hippocratic Oath) that UX designers could use as a starting point. Long answer The topic/issue of ethics in UX is extremely ...


0

No and yes. Ethical issues as a broad stroke are the same; don't do bad stuff. Doesn't matter if you're a car salesman (sell cars with broken brakes), a contractor (leave out rebar to save money) or a designer or whatever. But yes, the interaction makes it a slightly different group of choices to make. Design (print, web, ux) is largely communication and, ...



Top 50 recent answers are included