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73

"Sort by date" is probably the most common option, but it's not the way that most people speak. Where possible, I prefer speaking like a human (as opposed to an engineer), and so I would prefer using something like: Newest first or Oldest first


28

I'd be inclined to "Recommended Sorting", but since it breaks the "Sort by..." pattern, I'd choose either "Sort Automatically" which breaks the pattern only slightly, or one of my favourite terms for this kind of "magic": Relevance. So I'd go with Sort by Relevance. After all, what heuristic does is being more relevant to the user's interest.


25

The best method is to use the lower bound of a statistical confidence interval. I won't go into detail about how to do this, as Evan Miller has a great post on How NOT to sort by average rating for a Bernoulli distribution - which is what you have. The main reason that you would use this method is to find a balance between the average vote and the number ...


15

I quite like the approach that the game Wordament takes: You are able to see the top results, as well as those near your ranking. I would prefer if it could ensure your score was on-screen initially though, probably by reducing the number of players before the "split" and even just above your own score.


12

I would show a shaded / coloured bar with the user above the first place person in the list, and then show the standard list with them in whatever position they are in. It's what StackExchange did for the Winter Bash special, and it worked really well. I happen to be at the top, so you see me twice, but I would be at the top even if I were in Benny's ...


12

It is well known that when people select icons or buttons, they aren't consciously evaluating that icon and then choosing it. They are usually going by memory. The factor that most effects our memory of items to select is their spatial position. So if you move icons as people use them, you will end up subtly frustrating people. As an example, Microsoft ...


12

TL;DR: Use a multi factor ranking system. A good example to follow is the way that Google rank search results. We of course don't know the precise details of their ranking algorithm, but they have arguably done the most research on this and have the most success. What we do know for sure is that Google include a large number of factors and apply a ...


11

If I were looking for something clearer I'd use 'Sort by Recommended' That said, whimsical terms like Genius and Magic (and Automagic) don't bother me. I see them as shorthand for complex process that a good UX makes simple; in this case, it's personalized sorting. Since personalization features are often marketed as differentiators, new terms will probably ...


11

Ideally, I would go with 'by date' since it is more accessible. Even people with English as their non-primary language understand the word date easily, where as chronological might be a hit or a miss.


8

This is always tricky, but I think you could implement a list view as in StackExchange User Reputation League. Even if an item isn't added by a user per see, it could be used in your case as well. Add the newly added item to the top of the list keeping the sorting/filtering options intact. But make clear that this is not a part of the filter/sort by changing ...


7

JohnGB's answer works well at the top of a ratings list, but it causes problems further down the list. For an example, using 95% confidence intervals: A has 100 upvotes, 3 downvote (97%). Confidence Interval: (0.917, 0.990) B has 10 upvotes, 0 downvotes (100%). Confidence Interval: (0.722, 1) C has 180 upvotes, 100 downvotes (67%). Confidence Interval: ...


6

I would call it "pairwise comparison". I recall that IBM Rational Focal Point uses this method to rank requirements. The purpose is to get a list ordered by priority, even though the list of requirements could be overwhelming. Divide and conquer. The items of pairs that you are not able to answer still get a place in the list based on the result of those ...


6

I think you have two options: The first one is to sort database entries (chronologially, alphabetically, numerically) and the second one is to sort a list by a column value (data object attribute). It might depend on the amount or type of options you are going to present. In the first case you would have the text "Sort" followed by a dropdown with the ...


6

For a timeline to be more than a "sort by date" option, it needs to have another facet to it. What other useful information will displayed by the timeline other than just the order in which events happened? For example, if I was making filterable timeline of WWII events, I could use the space between events to give an indication of how far apart they were ...


5

In general it is always descending. But for forecast, it is best to use ascending. Simply because forecast always means future, so always have date from now to the future. If you see weather forecast it is also ascending link. If you look at the stock market, it always shows dates in ascending order. If you think of 2020, I would suggest instead of giving ...


5

The critical issue, from your description, is finding related/similar proposals. Have a look at this visualisation: force directed layout, which could cluster your documents, giving you the kind of periodic table you are looking for, that can then be explored. The UX advantage here is that instead of requesting each group of related proposals with a ...


5

At the risk of creating an SE black hole, here's my answer from the original. I think ABS and MAG are decent keywords you can link to control sorting, especially if you have mouse-over text pop up that explains the action - i.e. "Sort by absolute value". You do have a nice setup with your icons though, and we should work to preserve that. Currently, you ...


5

And if it has maximum of 30 items and all of them are visible why you just not place an action at the end of the list and add an ability to quickly reorder the list? So, position of the new item will be obvious. And you can keep the selection untouched in this case.


5

I guess it depends on what you want to do with it, and how often you imagine it would be used. Solution 1: Badges One way would be to add a badge-like indicator to the sorting: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups You will need to consider not only the display, but the actual interaction for manipulating it. How do ...


5

As the other answers generally agree, what you basically want to do is, in effect, to bias the rankings for items with low vote counts towards some "default" rank — which might be the mean rank, if you want an unbiased estimate, or a very low rank if you subscribe to the idea that an item should be ranked low until it's proven to deserve a higher rank. ...


5

I have yet to see a situation where having to select twice again to resort is an issue, but if it showed itself to be, I would: Mark the new row that is no longer in order by changing the background colour. Change the sort icon colour to to show that the current sort doesn't hold. Change the to reflect that it will reapply the sort. Colour the colour of ...


5

There are good examples for each of the cases, but they are chosen in conjunction with the navigation placement and overall site design. OKCupid uses a top filter and it suits their needs well, however they already have a left navigation bar, a top filter is the only option that makes sense for them. oDesk on the other hand uses a left filter, which ...


4

The simple answer is that people are more interested in newer content than older content. With old content first, people will come to a site and first be shown something that they have seen before - bad UX. Then they will have to remember what page they were on last - bad UX. Then they have to navigate to some page which may not be easily accessible ...


4

I'd try to avoid the arrows, because it is unclear what they should mean. Instead, I would only use the increasing/decreasing bar widths: options a or b without arrows.


4

If the price varies based on materials, you should be able to give an approximate price range for it. Maybe show the price as POA ($100 - $180 guide), and then sort based on the average of the two. Removing the items completely makes it appear as if they don't exist. Putting them in any position (either beginning or the end) is problematic as there is no ...


4

It's a pity that you have so little space availabe, otherwise you could expand on your sorted graphs icons. The bottom graphs are sorted on absolute value (red is for negative values): Abs(x) works pretty well as an abbreviation. If your users have a mathematics background, you could use |x| instead.


4

If one is going to use playful labels for things, there must be a way to find out what the "fun" feature does. In my opinion, Google gets it wrong by not providing any sort of documentation on this feature (other than this old blog post). What's more, they've apparently broke the feature with their recent redesign, so that's a problem, too. My favorite ...


4

You could try a User Centric approach where the logged-in user sees his position right in the middle of the page, surrounded by the 10 people on top and 10 under him/her. click, or ideally scroll to see full list starting at the top.


4

The use of integers, as suggested by Andre may be your best bet, but I’d test it. It may only work for the geekier of users. I, however, would like to suggest that your second option of having dedicated sorting controls is often worth the clutter. This is especially true if the sorting controls are interactive; for example, users can open a dropdown for ...


4

You should present the most important information first, and so that will determine the order that you present the logs in. For most logging applications, the most recent logs are more important, and so it's better UX to present the newest items first. However, there are situations where each log is fairly long, and either the older logs are more critical, ...



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