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6

These attributes in laid back social networking applications have all sorts of made up (re-*) words to make their application special. Retweet, Repin and Rehop (hopflow.com) are the same kind of re-thingies scattered all over the web – all trying to do the same thing: be famous, attract many user and (ultimately) sell their platform to Google, Microsoft or ...


4

The whole point of social logins is to make it easier to log in to ensure that users do NOT have to remember a lot of different username / passwords to ensure that to avoid remember all those different ones, they would use the same ones on different sites creating a security risk for themselves but most importantly: that they don't have to trust you to ...


4

UX answer: No. Wait. That's not right. UX answer: Hell no! Annoying the user is usually not going to provide a good user experience. So don't do it. Business/Marketing answer: Maybe. Maybe the benefits outweigh the UX drawbacks. But we can't answer that as it will vary from project to project, business objective to business objective, etc. As for ...


3

Though there may not seem to be a big difference between the words "auto-login" and "auto-register", there's actually a very big difference in expectations. I've done work in this before and this can get into the weeds rather quickly, but it's best to understand things. Background Social or Third-Party Logins use a technology called OpenID or OAuth2. ...


3

Stats and numbers are what distinguish novice users from experienced ones. It's a reward for having been active on the platform and using it more than another person might have. Specific to your application, you've mentioned that a user can have Friends as well as Followers. Looking at a few examples of such an implementation, Facebook introduced ...


3

Every social network out there displays, at least to the user, the number of friends/followers they have. People like to feel accomplished. People see a higher number of followers/friends as that accomplishment in a social network, especially content creators. People who go out of their way to create content for your site gauge their "worth" as a ...


2

I think a good question to ask is, "Is this appropriate for your type of audience?" I'm not sure if your end user are clients or brokers, but the thought of a professional brokerage or even a client logging in with their Facebook account seems strange to me. It's like a bank with social logins. The sensitivity of this type of website seems unnatural to ...


1

The difference is that this kind of feedback doesn’t include a reputation system built on numeric points. There is no user profile dashboard counting number of “me too” or getting badges for five “me too” clicks. This is (as I understand it) just a way to recognize the post as helpful without having to add a comment. It is very similar to the Facebook like ...


1

Definitely, definitely auto-register. If I wanted to input my username, password, and email, I would've gone to the register page and input those fields. Facebook login's basic permission gives you the ability to retrieve all the data you will ask for in the register page, as well as additional information you could use to fill out the user's profile ...


1

Statistic varies from blog to blog. I'll state some of my past experience, but the statistics I have will not bring too much information. Showing a widget with likes -the like of Facebook Facepile will show that are actually people interested (like) this blog/content and it will appear more alive and trustworthy in the eyes of the user. Share buttons ...


1

Well, it is dependent on how you are using the data, but one approach that seems to have gained some popularity recently is to use "People You Know" and "People You May Know" for friends and "friends of friends", respectively. If you are comfortable with not having (and able to not have, within your design) a label for people with no implicit tie to the ...


1

As wtfsven and abhinavc said the numbers help distinguish users but it does so by rewarding a certain type of behaviour. You asked whether a social app can survive without such numbers and I would say yes, it can. But would you really want to do without them? I don't know what your social network revolves around but there is plenty of options to use a ...


1

I would say that you should first start implementing comments (maybe Facebook comments), then look at their evolution. Try to feel if a specialized board would solve any problem the comments have. Plus, a wide empty board does not make one want to create an account. Using a simple comments system is easier on the user, especially if they don't have to ...


1

At my company, enthuse.me, we use a form for the 'enthuse account'/e-mail login and 3 buttons for the social logins, separated on the page. If you look at enthuse.me/signups (our sign up page) you'll see we have a similar separation for creating an account with e-mail address or social. In our usability testing so far, no one has been confused by this ...


1

Why not just 'with my [service name] account'? It removes ambiguity as to what exactly the account is for, and makes it obvious that this is a local login option. 'With my email' is common, but I think your concerns are valid - I've encountered some who get confused and think they're signing into their email account instead.


1

In one word, no. Users have used the social login to make it easier and asking for the same info again defeats the purpose. There are two options: Simplify your register form to be just email and password, have strong logic to deal with mistakes and get rid of the social login. Advise the user if they try to use their social media login details on the ...


1

This is really a marketing and design issue, but first I'd try to make an exhaustive list of current social symbols, present them to an experienced icon/symbol designer and say "make us something different from all these". You'd probably want a lawyer involved to avoid trademark infringement and establish the symbol you decide upon as your trademark. In ...


1

There are quite a few questions here. The best way to get user to like your page would be via the standard like button. Directing them from your website to the facebook page and counting on them to like the facebook page there is a longer flow of action than the user just clicking the like button on your webpage. While many people like to place facebook ...


1

Unless you have a particular reason for really wanting the visitors to visit the facebook page (such as trying to market your site through facebook), it's much more user-friendly just to let them link it on the site without redirecting to facebook. If the main point of the page is to get the user to click the "like" button, the lower-right corner of the ...


1

In my opinion, social media sites now feel obligated to offer a "retweet"/"repin"/"reblog" (Tumblr)/"share" (Facebook) option to allow for the spread of information, in an age where home videos go viral, and a the number of views of a "viral" video today easily dwarf such statistics from past years (*still trying to find the most viewed YouTube videos per ...



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