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108

We ran a quick user test and found that more people were signing up with their emails If you trust your test, then you should trust your users and design a solution that meets their desires. We are trying to encourage users to connect with their Facebook/Twitter accounts instead Why is that? Do you have sound reasoning behind this in that it will ...


19

Provide a regular register method In a comment to your question I said that I wouldn't use your app if the only way to register is via social networks. The reasons vary from person to person and to not make this answer go off-topic too much I'll give you just a quick outline about some issues: Simple but relevant: I don't use the famous networks I don't ...


17

The only advantage that I see as a user (for sites that I don't actually want to use in combination with twitter/facebook) is that it is quicker to log in with an existing account. As such you may want to structure it like so: Log in with existing account (can be social media or email) vs Register new account


9

I generally avoid signing up to random websites with Facebook, because I don't want those sites posting junk to my Facebook profile. One recent exception was Fallen London, which has a link saying "Read our civilised social media policy" right next to the "create a free account" -> "sign in with Facebook" link. The linked policy says things like "It's your ...


6

We used social plugin for couple of our products for login. To answer your first question, the simple advantage is that the user need not enter his credentials every time he/she signs in to your app. Most of the times the user is already logged into FB / google etc and can use the same to sign into your app too. A large percentage of users turn away when ...


6

I trust facebook.com (sort of), so I put information on there such as my likes. I don't trust just any old site I stumble across on the Internet. So there's no way that I'm going to register for your application with my Facebook account. However, after some use, I may find that I do trust your application. Then I might be ready to click "Connect with ...


5

The methods of registration you provide define your addressable market of users. Whichever option you provide your users, you are hoping for two things: They actually have that sign in method. They trust you with having access to the method they choose. Do they have the sign in method? Think about your market of users and if they'll have these methods. ...


5

It sounds like you're on the right track with positive reinforcement, though, it is really hard to encourage people to be pioneers with zero content, zero activity and an unknown wait time. In your specific situation I would suggest giving more options to the user... Here's a little demo of a more generic example Users could click on an empty heart to ...


4

I don't understand why you want to change the user habit for the sign up? (business goals?) Sign up with social media is just an alternative for the user. Moreover, your test tells you that your users prefer email. Maybe, you would have to ask users why they prefer this solution instead of social media accounts? Maybe you don't use the good social media ...


4

Tania Lang on her article Content Sharing and Social Networking Buttons, concluded the following based on scant research data : Ensure share buttons are subtle and contextual. Don’t include them below your H1 page heading. Give your poor users a chance to read something before they decide to share it. Shoving all the buttons in their faces is ...


4

Only using these big social media authentication accounts to sign into your website aimed at students/young people will work fine. However lets think about the users who dont have a gmail twitter or facebook. You should put a section in there for them. Dont have a twitter/gmail/hotmail? sign up for one here. Suggest them to sign up for one that takes the ...


3

The bad news: In almost all businesses UX doesn't ultimately control the customer experience (the entire business does), and a huge part of our work is finding ways to create good user experience while also satisfying "internal customers" (management, marketing, etc). In that sense, the "User" in UX includes both your internal and external customers. ...


3

However it might be done, logging in and signing up are two different things. The sign up path is almost certainly more complex than the login path, regardless of whether social login or a more traditional login are used. These crucial differences are not negated just because the technology allows the process to be done in one click. For example, you may ...


3

I had a friend login User testing! Awesome! and the immediate reaction was that I needed some sort of basic tour to explain how to get around. Great feedback, but it is telling you something different than what you are currently reading from it. What your user testing is telling you is that your navigation architecture is inappropriate for your ...


3

The number of social share buttons that has the highest conversion rate depends on a number of factors, and so no single number answer can reasonably be given. The general rule from my own experience is that it's best to keep it down to as few as possible. Often even just having a single option outperforms 3 or 5 options, but it depends on your site and ...


2

I think you should allow your breadcrumbs to show only the hierarchical view of your site , not how you reached there, which is summarized in the browser's history (at least if you made your site bookmarkable). As usability consultant Jakob Nielsen says here: Offering users a Hansel-and-Gretel-style history trail is basically useless, because it simply ...


2

There are many reasons why you need to signup users. Perhaps one of the most important ones is to collect their data (name, email, etc). You can monetize these data later sending email offers, showing targeted content, enhancing their user experience etc. If you use a social login (Facebook, Google+) you have multiple additional benefits, for instance: ...


2

The exact answer depends on your users (who are they and what services are the likely to be signed up for?) and your use case (you wouldn't want Facebook login on a business site, for example). If you want to research this, it is easy to find demographic information for social media sites. For example, take a look at this PewResearch report. Ultimately, ...


2

You can check the trustworthiness of your product and service. If users are choosing e-mail registration, there can be a trust issue. It may not be the company itself, but that the contextual information is important for users. As in the context, a user can enter a job application site with LinkedIn account and a person may not want to use their Facebook ...


2

I'm coming from a web developer perspective, so I am a bit biased, but here's my two cents: Local domains are great, but hard to remember, if you're going to be using different countries, I would go with website.com/ca/mcdonalds. This actually makes it easier for other websites to integrate as well, as it is a simple RESTful interface. The /ca/ designates a ...


2

If you value social authentication more than the regular approach, it's better to have social log in logos as CTAs (buttons instead of only logos; e.g. Airbnb), and at the top. Also, studies has shown that labels for input fields perform the best at the top of its respective field. I'd prefer having placeholders to save space. I would also suggest you to ...


2

Simply put, a regular sign up won't hurt — especially for users that'd prefer to leave their social network details out of it. Sometimes when I'm trying something new, I prefer a regular signup.


2

This would most likely add much more confusion than any benefit it would add, as the current standard for social networks is that there is 1 profile picture for each user that is used everywhere. However, if you would like to give more views of the user, then you could adopt a system similar to what Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ do where the user has a ...


2

It depends a lot on what type of content it is, and what type of user/reader you are showing the content to. Twitter (good for general sharing, especially if a "hot topic" of the moment (e.g. "Las Vegas hit by mega blizzard - over 7 feet of snow!")) Facebook (good for general sharing of anything that isn't highly tech relateed (e.g. "Intel's new nano flux ...


1

If you have the expertise or infrastructure to do so you should also offer your own registration (i.e. if it doesn't add too much expense to your project). Social media single sign on is a great low friction method for users who are already signed up to the various providers and don't mind using this method, but you probably don't want to force potential ...


1

I have not tested this. But, design logic would say yes, inline links should work better on average. Many twitter links have been shortened so it's difficult to tell what the contents of the link are. This creates hesitation for the user because she has to figure out whether to click the link. Users will typically try to figure out what the link ...


1

The vertical spacing between rows is small enough to make the whole thing blur together as "one thing" when first looking at it - it's only after some examination that I realize that there's three major options at the top level that I need to choose from. Furthermore, the wide horizontal spacing between LinkedIn and Yahoo makes it seem like "Google LinkedIn" ...


1

Ordering by popularity seems to be a good option. Social login data for different quarters of 2014 from well-known social login providers such as Gigya, Janrain and LoginRadius show that the majority of users use Facebook and Google when compare with Twitter, hence if ordered by popularity, it would be Facebook, Google then Twitter. Of course, this can ...


1

A URL must uniquely identify a page. This is simply a basic principle, and you should discard any option that breaks it. Note the requirement you mention in your question: I need the businesses to be able to post the URLs of their pages... It won't be acceptable to businesses if the only available URL goes to a page where the user selects from ...


1

Logically, you could demonstrate that the gains in brand-awareness are negligible -- things that do instant-feeds captivate user attention for a whole 3 seconds before people move on to the next thing. You could also make the case that the quality of your product will shine through -- if you are taking shortcuts for brand-awareness then your gains will ...



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