Hot answers tagged

11

Facebook have follow feature if the user have set her account to allow followers. Followers only see posts that the followed user posts publicly. The main difference is that both parties have acknowledge that there is a friend relationship. One sends a friend request – the other accept (or decline) the request. But to follow someone – there is only one party ...


8

I'm not sure about data on desktop design, but I can say that for mobile devices, people will often use the social media login option when it is presented. This article about mobile interaction and behavior tells us the following: SOCIAL LOGIN: While roughly half of the people who participate in our research say they don't like – or want – to make use ...


7

For your specific question on which social logins to use, it depends on your users/market. However, Facebook is by far and away the most important one, followed by Google. Then a mix of Twitter, LinkedIn and Yahoo.


5

It sounds like you're on the right track with positive reinforcement, though, it is really hard to encourage people to be pioneers with zero content, zero activity and an unknown wait time. In your specific situation I would suggest giving more options to the user... Here's a little demo of a more generic example Users could click on an empty heart to ...


4

(In social media and the internet) For facebook: Follow is a subset of Friend. When you add someone as a Friend, you automatically follow that person, and they automatically follow you (under the assumption the friend request was accepted). Most social websites, offer a service titled Follow. This means exactly what it says—you will subscribe to updates ...


4

Depending on your audience, but if you're trying to make users more active and not irritate them... make them laugh. I love Spaceballs The Movie. This is how you say it:


4

The best way to show the message is in a simple, informal way with words that speak to the domain, rather than the technology or medium. For instance, if this message is in response to a user searching posts for a specific subject, the message could be something like this: There aren't any conversations on this topic. If you wanted to get cute, you ...


3

Gestalt principles are not mutually exclusive categories. A good set of share buttons has proximity, similarity, and perhaps enclosure. But often you see differently styled buttons together, with little similarity. The top row is VERY consistent, but sacrifices some of the brand identity. The bottom row is already showing differnt { shapes, font styles, ...


3

In one line, The user must see the most important content first, hence remove the need for scrolling for them. Which means: When a user is viewing messages/ news or any items which may be dependent upon time, the newest things must be seen first. But if the same list of messages contains information about tasks to be completed within given time, ...


3

Use a human-readable link in anything intended for print. The case sensitivity is only one part of the problem with the short URL. Besides this, it also looks like gibberish, making it hard to remember and enter. There are various ways of generating a human-readable link (presumably you found one already in the Facebook setting). Some URL shorteners ...


3

The number of social share buttons that has the highest conversion rate depends on a number of factors, and so no single number answer can reasonably be given. The general rule from my own experience is that it's best to keep it down to as few as possible. Often even just having a single option outperforms 3 or 5 options, but it depends on your site and ...


2

Well, as a matter of fact, if well done, it's a quite good idea. For starters, you should NEVER use a random picture. Instead, let the user create an album of rotating profile pictures to avoid showing unwanted pictures. With this, you can use some nice tricks to give your site a knack. For example, create a profile picture competition where your users can ...


2

This would most likely add much more confusion than any benefit it would add, as the current standard for social networks is that there is 1 profile picture for each user that is used everywhere. However, if you would like to give more views of the user, then you could adopt a system similar to what Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ do where the user has a ...


2

It depends a lot on what type of content it is, and what type of user/reader you are showing the content to. Twitter (good for general sharing, especially if a "hot topic" of the moment (e.g. "Las Vegas hit by mega blizzard - over 7 feet of snow!")) Facebook (good for general sharing of anything that isn't highly tech relateed (e.g. "Intel's new nano flux ...


2

These are called Actions to that particular post/card/list-item. The actions will differ from application to application but the basic philosophy is to make it easier and granular for the user to perform the action for a particular element such as a Facebook Status. They are specifically used to perform an important action. As a design principle, the ...


2

Perhaps the most notable example of a feed where the newest items are at the bottom is forums. Although not a "feed" in the very strictest sense of the word, forums wouldn't work any other way. In my experience, whenever context demands that you have read the older stuff first (like forums), then the new content is always at the bottom. On the other hand, ...


2

There are probably specific anecdotes and data you can get from talking to someone at the LA Times, but we can also look at the user related properties of the feature and the business needs of a media outlet. Media outlets put share buttons everywhere, but users are deleting the precooked text. It's possible that someone sat in a room and said, "what if we ...


2

The solution can be catered in a slightly different way to solve such issues. A simple layout like this would solve quite some issues. Mobile designs require careful usage of space. Illustrative approach for such can help simplify and beautify app designs. Description about the layout: The social login buttons can be arranged horizontally instead of ...


2

If you wish me to log into your site from work, you need to provide a way for me to do it without risking my Google or Facebook password. I may not trust my employer to not be spying on me. There are also a small number of people that don’t have an account on Facebook etc, or who does don’t remain logged in and will not type there “important” password ...


1

Obviously, with registration, there would be a bit more fields to fill in, and the user would have to scroll down to register using social media, even though we would prefer it if they would register using social media, so that we would be able to retrieve more data about them On mobile apps, user should be able to perform all operations quickly be it ...


1

It all goes with your business needs. If you want your user's information, then it would be better to include your own login first, and social login as last resource. If you want less friction, user's information is no problem for you and want just some kind of simple user identification, then give preference to social media login. Additionally, I see ...


1

If you prefer users to register using social media, then you should definitely put those choises on top. It will gently push them to use it. To me, it is confusing that you call the manual account creation "Mobile, Username or Email". I would just let the user fill in email (or username if that suits your system better).


1

It's taken me a while, but I've considered all the info you've provided and have a possible answer for you. First I want to summarise my understanding of what you've done, just to make sure we're on the same page. In summary, you measured the rate of user registrations on both your wish list and order confirmation pages for a period of some weeks. You've ...


1

Yes, Buzzfeed have been calling them reactions for ages. I hope Facebook's version ends up looking more like Buzzfeed's version. You can see them in use on this article. 24 Medieval Reactions That Are Literally Your Life


1

A very comprehensive answer is called for, and delivered by DAO1. I would like to add the simple answer, which in fact is the driving principal. User interfaces should be driven by purpose. Consider the purpose of the user and stack the architecture in terms of priorities. Simplify by erradicating all non-essential elements. There is a time to read, a ...


1

I'll try to answer the more specific points at the end: effects of traffic leaks Well, any link would 'leak traffic'. So for this to be good/bad, it has to be determined if it's really a bad thing to begin with. For instance, a link to twitter. The bad side of that coin is that they link to twitter and are no longer on your site. The good side of that ...


1

It's worth remembering that while every design/dev decision impacts the user experience, not every decision can be rationalized from a UX perspective. There's no easily-findable explanation by the creators of Instagram of why there's no zooming. Constraints and the Creative Process This is speculation, but it's based in logic. Instagram is a tool that ...


1

I have surprisingly noticed the following behavior with my social logins. You may or may not use this to your advantage if you have multiple logins on your website which users need to select from. If I happen to be on a Fun website which is about connecting with people/ friends/ family/ etc, I generally would sign in with Facebook. If it's something ...


1

Also another thing to keep in mind is that some companies want to attain the Profile data from its users. They use this data for marketing practices and understanding target audiences. Data points like Name, DOB, Location etc. Each Social platform delivers a variety of different profile data to the platform owner. The main one being Facebook. Facebook ...


1

Breadcrumbs are useful when people are navigating very hierarchically organized information, such as in Windows Explorer: when browsing the file system, they want to know where they are and easily navigate a level up. A programmer's IDE (such as my IntelliJ IDEA) is another example. In other desktop applications such as Word or Photoshop you don't find ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible