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27

...What's wrong with 'Home'? It's more important to be usable than creative.


22

Breadcrumbs Rock! And I think you have a personal bias against them rather then making a clear observation about their use. I notice none of the big players (StackExchange, Facebook, Google, YouTube) use breadcrumbs. StackExchange uses tags. Those are like breadcrumbs, but it's an associated way rather then structural. Facebook uses AJAX inplace ...


19

Your application or company logo (as long as it is simple). This is already a standard for web sites so it seems like a safe choice.


17

To me, this is all about alternatives, providing the "value menu" of things most people would want to say in a tiny comment, in one click. Provided you have made the alternatives, e.g. "click the +1/awesome/like button!" discoverable and easy, I favor a blocking message like: We prefer that comments be longer than 15 characters so they add ...


15

The reasons for the popularity of a "thing" is hard to determine and I believe the boffins that are into this sort of thing are still teasing out the details. I think it has less to do with good marketing or usability and more to do with human behaviour; particularly human "herd" behaviour. Some products or services are marketed with energy and money behind ...


15

I'd say this isn't a dark pattern at all. The simplest definition of a Dark Pattern is design meant to trick people. Now, there can be good tricks too, so Dark Patterns are really about deceiving users into doing something that benefits your business goals but not them. There's no trickery here. They clearly present what they want you to do (Tweet), how to ...


14

A nice trick that is slowly spreading around is using a house icon with no text.


14

If the user "likes" your web site (or even better, one of the articles on your web site), this is a one time action. As an effect, the user will post an "I like this page/article" on their wall and all their friends (or whatever publicity they choose) will see that post in their Facebook timeline. Then it will vanish into eternity... You will have no ...


14

I recommend not restricting to jpeg only: Social media sites (usually) rely on people creating profiles and becoming active on the site. If at any point it becomes a pain to create a profile, users won't do it. If they have only a .png, they likely aren't going to go create a .jpeg to create a profile unless there is a huge incentive for them to continue. ...


13

If I remember correctly the reason is because the share button allows tracking of users since it's served from facebook/twitter/gplus. So without you clicking on it they already know you are on the site. A two click control gets rid of the tracking while making a inconvenience for the user. Heres a description of the issue


12

I don't work for Google, so my answer will just be a guess at best. Let's look at this button in basic terms: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups It's necessary to make clear that the state is active. Google does this by changing the colour. With this type of button, you would expect that clicking again would ...


12

Most users will recognize the logo mark for the social media platforms they use, so additional explanatory text for each icon would be overkill. If you do feel like users might need some additional context, you could use tooltips to display extra text on mouse hover. The current placement of your social icons seems random. It looks like you placed them in ...


11

The generic term is up votes or upvotes I guess. Up - like up in the air - and you could call the resulting number of upvotes the altitude. This comment's got wings!. [Too cheesy?]


11

Yes, it's a dark pattern, because the website advertises it as free: But when you follow the link, then you find out it's not quite free - they want you to advertise their product. So it's a bait-and-switch. It advertises as if it is freeware, makes you psychologically commit by clicking onto "The Bricks" for more info. And then you find out that it's ...


11

I do not think this is a secret design. Actually, this is a principle that may be inherited from newspapers or magazines: It would be impossible to read articles if they had not that three or four columns layout, just because your eyes would lose on which line you are reading and which is the next to read. This minimizes eyebal movements while reading. ...


11

It is perhaps not necessary to write out the label Facebook or Twitter next to the icon as Chris stated in his previous answer. But, please explain why I should follow you on Facebook. Is it for getting great discounts? Is it because you post new outfits that I can use for inspiration? Is it because I no longer need to go to your web site for updates? If ...


9

Interesting question, so I've gone digging for some research on this. This study indicates that more than one sharing button does improve CTR when included in EMail messages (although it is referring to a single specific sharing button (i.e. Twitter) rather than a generic 'Share This' button). A lot of my initial searching seems to point to this one ...


9

Well...is it a problem? I forget where I heard this, but there's a story about how everyone assumes those "no dogs" signs are just put up in stores just because they've always been there, it's convention. But really, those signs get put up because someone brought a dog, and it caused problems. To avoid further problems, they banned dogs. Now, maybe they ...


9

Have you considered offering a recommended limit? For instance, if a comment is less than say, 15 characters, upon submitting the comment the user is presented with an alert suggesting that they elaborate on their comment. This will make the user consider the value of their comment, and will hopefully trigger the action of adding more substance. Always give ...


8

I've experimented on my blog with different varieties. I have yet to see them be used in any significant way. It's a classical 90/9/1 scenario. 1% of people share 90% of the things out there. They drive the overall usage of these kinds of widgets. Additionally, people often overestimate the value of their own content and think that people will share ...


8

What can work is a small representation of your homepage. G+ uses a combination of a house and a feed: Another common one is the grid icon, used by Facebook, Yelp and many others: (of course this only makes sense if you have a grid navigation) So if your homepage has a distinctive layout, this approach might work.


8

Facebook says the Share Button is deprecated and will not be supported anymore at some point in the future. Reason is that clickthrough rates of the Like Button are better. We deprecated the Share Button when we launched the Like button, because the Like button improves clickthrough rates by allowing users to connect with one click, and by allowing them ...


8

The best practice here is to display the social media icons in a neutral color, usually grey. This approach is both widely practiced and accepted. It's worth noting that most of the major social media brands have usage guidelines that explicitly prohibit the above. For example, Facebook's Brand permission center lists the specific brand assets that are ...


7

The buttons prompt readers to share, and they make sharing much quicker. If you're already logged into Twitter, you can tweet a post from my blog with just two clicks. If the button wasn't there then you might not even think of tweeting. Yes, the sharing buttons add a bit of visual noise. The same is true of every feature on a website. You have to decide if ...


7

The usual answer to this is: it depends. But what does it depend on you ask? Good question. It depends on, firstly, how tightly integrated your application is into the social applications whose logins you are offering. If you need the functionality of say Facebook, then only offering Facebook integration is justified. Very often we would only like to ...


7

You Should Have a Public Marketing Site Typically in a web application the actual "application" part is behind an authentication wall which is not accessible to the public (and not easy to share with regular social networking share-buttons), but there is also, most likely, a public "marketing" side of the web application which is for most intents and ...


7

Though I cant speak from any existing research which FB or Google plus must have done with the logic of not enforcing that users have to upload facial pictures, I believe there are three primary reasons : Users might not be comfortable with posting their picture for personal or privacy concerns and would prefer to use a neutral picture such as a ...


7

Stylize buttons Advantages: Buttons are more consistant with other parts of your design (provided your ui has style) The overall look and feel is improved (provided your buttons don't look stupid) Buttons can have more meaning (express different contexts) Users are very accustomed to styled buttons, as most of the major websites use them : google, ...


7

As with any legal contract, both sides, including the user, must agree (“assent”) to the terms and conditions offered with the online service in order to create a legally enforceable “agreement.” In addition, a user can demonstrate agreement in a variety of ways, either by words or by deeds, depending on the circumstances. Online, however, the line ...


6

I've experimented with the AddThis style button, which offers dozens of social service share opportunities, versus narrowing it down to just the 2-3 services that seem conducive to my type of content. The shares were considerably higher - about 65% on some cases - on the larger buttons that clearly showed the social network (in this case, Twitter, Digg and ...



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