Hot answers tagged

74

Instruct Having something like this doormat outside your front door will 'permission prime' your guests on your expectations about shoe removal. Reinforce Having your shoes on a shoe-rack on the inside of your flat will further reinforce your expectation.


46

It is not uncommon to take your shoes off in Europe (at least in the UK and Belgium where I've lived). However, just sticking up a sign might be seen as rude / impersonal. If all else fails it's best just to ask people to take their shoes off. Assuming that your place is clean their shouldn't be any objections (unless they've got hole in their socks). As ...


21

Of course you can ask people, and of course you can put up a sign, but this is a UX question, not a . In an interaction design we wouldn't be happy putting up signs, or telling people how to behave: we want an environment that makes the desired behaviour automatic. I can't think of any any way to force this absolutely, but I think we can get pretty close: ...


11

Start with subtle clues, slowly becoming more direct. As is commonly advised to writers; show, don't tell. People like making decisions on their own, but they also generally want to make others feel good. And especially in new environments and situations, we mimic. It's all about gradually going from subliminal cues to explicitly stating the intended ...


11

Facebook have follow feature if the user have set her account to allow followers. Followers only see posts that the followed user posts publicly. The main difference is that both parties have acknowledge that there is a friend relationship. One sends a friend request – the other accept (or decline) the request. But to follow someone – there is only one party ...


5

It sounds like you're on the right track with positive reinforcement, though, it is really hard to encourage people to be pioneers with zero content, zero activity and an unknown wait time. In your specific situation I would suggest giving more options to the user... Here's a little demo of a more generic example Users could click on an empty heart to ...


5

Here in the UK many expect shoes to come off at the door and visitors will ask if they should remove them. We change from shoes to slippers as soon as we get home. We have an area in our entrance with a Bench so everyone can sit and easily remove shoes. I have found that it's best to be open and keep things simple. If people don't ask them we just say that ...


5

Why not just ask your guests to take off their shoes as they come in? Unlike a sign, it can't be interpreted as being pushy. At least in my experience, I've never felt that someone asking me to take off my shoes is being uptight, and I've never seen or heard of someone being annoyed by being asked to take off their shoes. I don't think I would pick up the ...


4

As I can't comment, I had to answer as a solution. As a French, I would also suggest to just tell people right away if you don't see them taking their shoes off as some people can miss cues, as Alex has suggested. And you can be pretty blunt about it. While Pharap is right that you can be more engaging, you can also be very direct with French people (1) ...


4

Set a white, clean blanket in the floor, and leave your shoes (a couple pairs) just before stepping on it as a demonstration. This should make your visitors worry about stepping on such a clean surface and imagine the solution. Anyway, be ready to handle cases of people that will not understand without getting upset.


4

(In social media and the internet) For facebook: Follow is a subset of Friend. When you add someone as a Friend, you automatically follow that person, and they automatically follow you (under the assumption the friend request was accepted). Most social websites, offer a service titled Follow. This means exactly what it says—you will subscribe to updates ...


3

In one line, The user must see the most important content first, hence remove the need for scrolling for them. Which means: When a user is viewing messages/ news or any items which may be dependent upon time, the newest things must be seen first. But if the same list of messages contains information about tasks to be completed within given time, ...


3

Good UX ensures that things work in specific contexts for specific users. Things that work on one site for one set of users come with no broad guarantees. See Should You Copy a Famous Site's Design? by Jakob Nielson.


2

Well, as a matter of fact, if well done, it's a quite good idea. For starters, you should NEVER use a random picture. Instead, let the user create an album of rotating profile pictures to avoid showing unwanted pictures. With this, you can use some nice tricks to give your site a knack. For example, create a profile picture competition where your users can ...


2

This would most likely add much more confusion than any benefit it would add, as the current standard for social networks is that there is 1 profile picture for each user that is used everywhere. However, if you would like to give more views of the user, then you could adopt a system similar to what Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ do where the user has a ...


2

The principle you want to leverage, here, is called social proof. I noticed that the experts at user-experience consultancy NN/g discuss this in their article, Social proof in the user experience. This article gives a quick overview and, in the last few paragraphs, provides links to other authors and research for in-depth reading. You might like to read ...


2

This feature is implemented in Facebook Messenger App. Users often gets added to a discussion without accepting or joining. When a discussion is going on among a few and each time notifying others who unwillingly was added, one can see that they leave quickly. It doesn't "notify" with a sound or lock screen message, but when a user enters the discussion it ...


2

These are called Actions to that particular post/card/list-item. The actions will differ from application to application but the basic philosophy is to make it easier and granular for the user to perform the action for a particular element such as a Facebook Status. They are specifically used to perform an important action. As a design principle, the ...


2

Not only comments help, but they are of the foremost importance. I won't extend much, but will give you a direct example, with restaurants and dishes as we're at it: The research factor This is eye tracking testing from Jakob Nielsen. As you may see, pictures are absolutely secondary, even when it relates to hyped chefs, people concentrated on the text ...


2

Perhaps the most notable example of a feed where the newest items are at the bottom is forums. Although not a "feed" in the very strictest sense of the word, forums wouldn't work any other way. In my experience, whenever context demands that you have read the older stuff first (like forums), then the new content is always at the bottom. On the other hand, ...


2

Oh my, this is going to be one of those "It depends" answers. But I'll try my best to avoid it. At first we need to know what purpose you have with your landing page. Since your referencing Instagram my assumption is that your conversion rate is the number of new users per day, ore something like that. This is very close to the Wikipedia definition of a ...


2

I personally like #2 more because you are showing people how the experience works before they need to provide personal information. That means people are more sold on the benefits (probably) before they are asked to 'convert' to an account. However, it probably matters more which one actually turns visitors to the site to accounts. You should test both and ...


2

If you think of a scenario where the forum is business critical, then it will hard to consolidate the essentials elements for the forum. If you compare graphic design forum (GDF - a good forum for designers) and stack exchange (SE), the philosophy of both are same — a platform for people to ask their questions and get engage with solutions from others. The ...


2

Even without knowing the exact algorithm, you can probably observe a few factors that come into the equation: Views: one way of defining popularity is the number of views that the shot has received, but because a person can look at a picture without necessarily liking it (and high views doesn't necessarily mean the work is of higher quality), it is only an ...


1

It depends. If the app is about people that know each other (FB kind), then its a good idea to just limit the feed from the 'day they started following'. If its mostly strangers (Twitter kind), then you can have full feed visibility. Reason I say is, Person A could have said or written something about person B in the past and A might not like the idea of B ...


1

I remember that few years back when msn messenger was around there used to be a similar feature indicating when someone closed a chat window. Personally to me and friends this caused quite a bit of tensions. it somehow gave the idea that the person on the other end didn't want to keep the chat window open. In your case as well I would recommend you not ...


1

Instagram is popular because of the content. The layout emphasizes the content and basically gets out of the way. There's nothing superfluous to the layout. Main focus is on the images, secondary on comments/likes and the rest is mostly tertiary navigation and functionality.


1

Disclaimer: Although Instagram is indeed very popular and does an excellent job of adhering to solid design principles, it is important to point out Instagram isn't a one size fits all solution. It is more important to understand the problem you are solving including the context in which you are solving it in order to yield the best result for your users. ...


1

It's worth remembering that while every design/dev decision impacts the user experience, not every decision can be rationalized from a UX perspective. There's no easily-findable explanation by the creators of Instagram of why there's no zooming. Constraints and the Creative Process This is speculation, but it's based in logic. Instagram is a tool that ...


1

For your specific scenario, there are many benefits and really can't see why NOT to use them. Basically, you want to have user's reviews, so while users are not the focal point, they're an important aspect of your site, if not THE MOST IMPORTANT. and this is NOT an exageration. I assume your app is oriented to sell. Now, with apps like yours, I can find 100 ...



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