Hot answers tagged

76

Instruct Having something like this doormat outside your front door will 'permission prime' your guests on your expectations about shoe removal. Reinforce Having your shoes on a shoe-rack on the inside of your flat will further reinforce your expectation.


46

It is not uncommon to take your shoes off in Europe (at least in the UK and Belgium where I've lived). However, just sticking up a sign might be seen as rude / impersonal. If all else fails it's best just to ask people to take their shoes off. Assuming that your place is clean their shouldn't be any objections (unless they've got hole in their socks). As ...


21

Of course you can ask people, and of course you can put up a sign, but this is a UX question, not a lifestyle/etiquette question. In an interaction design we wouldn't be happy putting up signs, or telling people how to behave: we want an environment that makes the desired behaviour automatic. I can't think of any any way to force this absolutely, but I ...


11

Start with subtle clues, slowly becoming more direct. As is commonly advised to writers; show, don't tell. People like making decisions on their own, but they also generally want to make others feel good. And especially in new environments and situations, we mimic. It's all about gradually going from subliminal cues to explicitly stating the intended ...


5

Here in the UK many expect shoes to come off at the door and visitors will ask if they should remove them. We change from shoes to slippers as soon as we get home. We have an area in our entrance with a Bench so everyone can sit and easily remove shoes. I have found that it's best to be open and keep things simple. If people don't ask them we just say that ...


5

Why not just ask your guests to take off their shoes as they come in? Unlike a sign, it can't be interpreted as being pushy. At least in my experience, I've never felt that someone asking me to take off my shoes is being uptight, and I've never seen or heard of someone being annoyed by being asked to take off their shoes. I don't think I would pick up the ...


4

As I can't comment, I had to answer as a solution. As a French, I would also suggest to just tell people right away if you don't see them taking their shoes off as some people can miss cues, as Alex has suggested. And you can be pretty blunt about it. While Pharap is right that you can be more engaging, you can also be very direct with French people (1) ...


4

Set a white, clean blanket in the floor, and leave your shoes (a couple pairs) just before stepping on it as a demonstration. This should make your visitors worry about stepping on such a clean surface and imagine the solution. Anyway, be ready to handle cases of people that will not understand without getting upset.


3

In one line, The user must see the most important content first, hence remove the need for scrolling for them. Which means: When a user is viewing messages/ news or any items which may be dependent upon time, the newest things must be seen first. But if the same list of messages contains information about tasks to be completed within given time, ...


2

Not only comments help, but they are of the foremost importance. I won't extend much, but will give you a direct example, with restaurants and dishes as we're at it: The research factor This is eye tracking testing from Jakob Nielsen. As you may see, pictures are absolutely secondary, even when it relates to hyped chefs, people concentrated on the text ...


2

Perhaps the most notable example of a feed where the newest items are at the bottom is forums. Although not a "feed" in the very strictest sense of the word, forums wouldn't work any other way. In my experience, whenever context demands that you have read the older stuff first (like forums), then the new content is always at the bottom. On the other hand, ...


2

This feature is implemented in Facebook Messenger App. Users often gets added to a discussion without accepting or joining. When a discussion is going on among a few and each time notifying others who unwillingly was added, one can see that they leave quickly. It doesn't "notify" with a sound or lock screen message, but when a user enters the discussion it ...


2

These are called Actions to that particular post/card/list-item. The actions will differ from application to application but the basic philosophy is to make it easier and granular for the user to perform the action for a particular element such as a Facebook Status. They are specifically used to perform an important action. As a design principle, the ...


2

As with so many things in UX, the answer is "it depends." I just concluded some user testing on a very complex site for a large gloabal enterprise. We tested it with twelve participants representative of the target audience. After guiding them through a half-hour of high-priority tasks — six hours of usage — I was surprised to see that NOT ONE of the ...


2

Oh my, this is going to be one of those "It depends" answers. But I'll try my best to avoid it. At first we need to know what purpose you have with your landing page. Since your referencing Instagram my assumption is that your conversion rate is the number of new users per day, ore something like that. This is very close to the Wikipedia definition of a ...


2

I personally like #2 more because you are showing people how the experience works before they need to provide personal information. That means people are more sold on the benefits (probably) before they are asked to 'convert' to an account. However, it probably matters more which one actually turns visitors to the site to accounts. You should test both and ...


2

Even without knowing the exact algorithm, you can probably observe a few factors that come into the equation: Views: one way of defining popularity is the number of views that the shot has received, but because a person can look at a picture without necessarily liking it (and high views doesn't necessarily mean the work is of higher quality), it is only an ...


2

If you think of a scenario where the forum is business critical, then it will hard to consolidate the essentials elements for the forum. If you compare graphic design forum (GDF - a good forum for designers) and stack exchange (SE), the philosophy of both are same — a platform for people to ask their questions and get engage with solutions from others. The ...


1

One way to encourage people to follow your social media is to have contents that fit your user groups. Content strategy is always heart of social media. Most of people would follow BuzzFeed on Facebook because they have great amazing feeds. They know who their audiences are. You might try to have a free content or contest or webinars on your Facebook and ...


1

I'd give a try of placing a shoe cabinet straight against the door (of the hallway size allows that, of course) so that you'd have to pass by its side on entrance. In this case, the shoe cabinet would act as a barrier on the entry and would naturally remind of itself by stopping the natural pathway course.


1

My home is a shoe-free zone as well. Our family uses a shoe rack and our guests typically leave their shoes in a pile next to whatever shoes we used that day. Whenever we'll having groups of people over we tell them in advance, "...oh and by the way we're a shoe-free home just so you're not thrown off we when you see the big pile of shoes by the door".


1

It depends. If the app is about people that know each other (FB kind), then its a good idea to just limit the feed from the 'day they started following'. If its mostly strangers (Twitter kind), then you can have full feed visibility. Reason I say is, Person A could have said or written something about person B in the past and A might not like the idea of B ...


1

I remember that few years back when msn messenger was around there used to be a similar feature indicating when someone closed a chat window. Personally to me and friends this caused quite a bit of tensions. it somehow gave the idea that the person on the other end didn't want to keep the chat window open. In your case as well I would recommend you not ...


1

Instagram is popular because of the content. The layout emphasizes the content and basically gets out of the way. There's nothing superfluous to the layout. Main focus is on the images, secondary on comments/likes and the rest is mostly tertiary navigation and functionality.


1

Disclaimer: Although Instagram is indeed very popular and does an excellent job of adhering to solid design principles, it is important to point out Instagram isn't a one size fits all solution. It is more important to understand the problem you are solving including the context in which you are solving it in order to yield the best result for your users. ...


1

It really depends on what your system offers and does. Have you answered the question yourself and asked your customers who fit into this use case? I'll make a few assumptions and hopefully give you enough information to make a decision: Merging Accounts This is where you can create a flow for your users to connect to a different account. Assuming they ...


1

Breadcrumbs are useful when people are navigating very hierarchically organized information, such as in Windows Explorer: when browsing the file system, they want to know where they are and easily navigate a level up. A programmer's IDE (such as my IntelliJ IDEA) is another example. In other desktop applications such as Word or Photoshop you don't find ...



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