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11

Facebook have follow feature if the user have set her account to allow followers. Followers only see posts that the followed user posts publicly. The main difference is that both parties have acknowledge that there is a friend relationship. One sends a friend request – the other accept (or decline) the request. But to follow someone – there is only one party ...


5

I worked on a social network recently and debated exactly this issue. We came to the same conclusion. Here's why: It provides consistency of experience. Users expect to be able to comment, like, or share posts. So removing one of these actions for your own post can create frustration because of the lack of consistency. Don't penalize users for posting ...


5

Yes! (but it's not what you think) Let's start with the downside of using profile pictures: Visually they can really clutter up lists and layouts. They are not terribly communicative. For enterprise applications a name is a lot more functional than a picture. You have to figure out how to get users to upload photos without making it a hurdle or an ...


5

It sounds like you're on the right track with positive reinforcement, though, it is really hard to encourage people to be pioneers with zero content, zero activity and an unknown wait time. In your specific situation I would suggest giving more options to the user... Here's a little demo of a more generic example Users could click on an empty heart to ...


4

(In social media and the internet) For facebook: Follow is a subset of Friend. When you add someone as a Friend, you automatically follow that person, and they automatically follow you (under the assumption the friend request was accepted). Most social websites, offer a service titled Follow. This means exactly what it says—you will subscribe to updates ...


3

In one line, The user must see the most important content first, hence remove the need for scrolling for them. Which means: When a user is viewing messages/ news or any items which may be dependent upon time, the newest things must be seen first. But if the same list of messages contains information about tasks to be completed within given time, ...


3

Good UX ensures that things work in specific contexts for specific users. Things that work on one site for one set of users come with no broad guarantees. See Should You Copy a Famous Site's Design? by Jakob Nielson.


2

Re Question 3 - Getting more info on users: let them add this voluntarily and progressively ( A bit like Linkedin does - with a '% completed' bar which pops up to remind the user from time to time ) If you force people to hand over info they will either go away or just make stuff up.


2

Sending email verifications with link inside seem to be the most used and accurate way to prevent from non-human registrations. As part of the core of your website related to social networking, IMHO allowing non-verified users navigate with a top bar as a reminder to activate their account would probably bother the website usability discouraging them to ...


2

I think @tohster answer covers photo usage quite well. So my answer will expand on the subject from a different angle. There are numerous examples of profile photos used within ERP and enterprise solutions in general. For example: Microsoft outlook uses senders photos in email headers and that looks like the mock-up below: Another example could be ...


2

This would most likely add much more confusion than any benefit it would add, as the current standard for social networks is that there is 1 profile picture for each user that is used everywhere. However, if you would like to give more views of the user, then you could adopt a system similar to what Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ do where the user has a ...


2

The principle you want to leverage, here, is called social proof. I noticed that the experts at user-experience consultancy NN/g discuss this in their article, Social proof in the user experience. This article gives a quick overview and, in the last few paragraphs, provides links to other authors and research for in-depth reading. You might like to read ...


2

This feature is implemented in Facebook Messenger App. Users often gets added to a discussion without accepting or joining. When a discussion is going on among a few and each time notifying others who unwillingly was added, one can see that they leave quickly. It doesn't "notify" with a sound or lock screen message, but when a user enters the discussion it ...


2

These are called Actions to that particular post/card/list-item. The actions will differ from application to application but the basic philosophy is to make it easier and granular for the user to perform the action for a particular element such as a Facebook Status. They are specifically used to perform an important action. As a design principle, the ...


2

Not only comments help, but they are of the foremost importance. I won't extend much, but will give you a direct example, with restaurants and dishes as we're at it: The research factor This is eye tracking testing from Jakob Nielsen. As you may see, pictures are absolutely secondary, even when it relates to hyped chefs, people concentrated on the text ...


2

Perhaps the most notable example of a feed where the newest items are at the bottom is forums. Although not a "feed" in the very strictest sense of the word, forums wouldn't work any other way. In my experience, whenever context demands that you have read the older stuff first (like forums), then the new content is always at the bottom. On the other hand, ...


2

Oh my, this is going to be one of those "It depends" answers. But I'll try my best to avoid it. At first we need to know what purpose you have with your landing page. Since your referencing Instagram my assumption is that your conversion rate is the number of new users per day, ore something like that. This is very close to the Wikipedia definition of a ...


2

I personally like #2 more because you are showing people how the experience works before they need to provide personal information. That means people are more sold on the benefits (probably) before they are asked to 'convert' to an account. However, it probably matters more which one actually turns visitors to the site to accounts. You should test both and ...


1

It depends. If the app is about people that know each other (FB kind), then its a good idea to just limit the feed from the 'day they started following'. If its mostly strangers (Twitter kind), then you can have full feed visibility. Reason I say is, Person A could have said or written something about person B in the past and A might not like the idea of B ...


1

I remember that few years back when msn messenger was around there used to be a similar feature indicating when someone closed a chat window. Personally to me and friends this caused quite a bit of tensions. it somehow gave the idea that the person on the other end didn't want to keep the chat window open. In your case as well I would recommend you not ...


1

Instagram is popular because of the content. The layout emphasizes the content and basically gets out of the way. There's nothing superfluous to the layout. Main focus is on the images, secondary on comments/likes and the rest is mostly tertiary navigation and functionality.


1

Disclaimer: Although Instagram is indeed very popular and does an excellent job of adhering to solid design principles, it is important to point out Instagram isn't a one size fits all solution. It is more important to understand the problem you are solving including the context in which you are solving it in order to yield the best result for your users. ...


1

It's worth remembering that while every design/dev decision impacts the user experience, not every decision can be rationalized from a UX perspective. There's no easily-findable explanation by the creators of Instagram of why there's no zooming. Constraints and the Creative Process This is speculation, but it's based in logic. Instagram is a tool that ...


1

Well, as a matter of fact, if well done, it's a quite good idea. For starters, you should NEVER use a random picture. Instead, let the user create an album of rotating profile pictures to avoid showing unwanted pictures. With this, you can use some nice tricks to give your site a knack. For example, create a profile picture competition where your users can ...


1

For your specific scenario, there are many benefits and really can't see why NOT to use them. Basically, you want to have user's reviews, so while users are not the focal point, they're an important aspect of your site, if not THE MOST IMPORTANT. and this is NOT an exageration. I assume your app is oriented to sell. Now, with apps like yours, I can find 100 ...


1

I have not tested this. But, design logic would say yes, inline links should work better on average. Many twitter links have been shortened so it's difficult to tell what the contents of the link are. This creates hesitation for the user because she has to figure out whether to click the link. Users will typically try to figure out what the link ...


1

I don't think users should edit their posts in any other app which isn't the official one (or something from third part that replaces it), because I think it could be confused. But in that case, have you thought about the possibility to implement it as native system extension, like in iOs? The user could upload its photo to your website with a caption, and ...


1

It really depends on what your system offers and does. Have you answered the question yourself and asked your customers who fit into this use case? I'll make a few assumptions and hopefully give you enough information to make a decision: Merging Accounts This is where you can create a flow for your users to connect to a different account. Assuming they ...


1

The short answer is it depends. On a basic website with a handful of pages, breadcrumbs are certainly unnecessary. But on larger sites (especially reference and documentation sites), breadcrumbs are extremely useful for navigation and orientation—one might even say they're downright necessary. The hard part is determining whether your site is large enough to ...



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