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108

We ran a quick user test and found that more people were signing up with their emails If you trust your test, then you should trust your users and design a solution that meets their desires. We are trying to encourage users to connect with their Facebook/Twitter accounts instead Why is that? Do you have sound reasoning behind this in that it will ...


17

The only advantage that I see as a user (for sites that I don't actually want to use in combination with twitter/facebook) is that it is quicker to log in with an existing account. As such you may want to structure it like so: Log in with existing account (can be social media or email) vs Register new account


9

I generally avoid signing up to random websites with Facebook, because I don't want those sites posting junk to my Facebook profile. One recent exception was Fallen London, which has a link saying "Read our civilised social media policy" right next to the "create a free account" -> "sign in with Facebook" link. The linked policy says things like "It's your ...


6

I trust facebook.com (sort of), so I put information on there such as my likes. I don't trust just any old site I stumble across on the Internet. So there's no way that I'm going to register for your application with my Facebook account. However, after some use, I may find that I do trust your application. Then I might be ready to click "Connect with ...


5

It sounds like you're on the right track with positive reinforcement, though, it is really hard to encourage people to be pioneers with zero content, zero activity and an unknown wait time. In your specific situation I would suggest giving more options to the user... Here's a little demo of a more generic example Users could click on an empty heart to ...


5

I worked on a social network recently and debated exactly this issue. We came to the same conclusion. Here's why: It provides consistency of experience. Users expect to be able to comment, like, or share posts. So removing one of these actions for your own post can create frustration because of the lack of consistency. Don't penalize users for posting ...


4

Yes! (but it's not what you think) Let's start with the downside of using profile pictures: Visually they can really clutter up lists and layouts. They are not terribly communicative. For enterprise applications a name is a lot more functional than a picture. You have to figure out how to get users to upload photos without making it a hurdle or an ...


4

I don't understand why you want to change the user habit for the sign up? (business goals?) Sign up with social media is just an alternative for the user. Moreover, your test tells you that your users prefer email. Maybe, you would have to ask users why they prefer this solution instead of social media accounts? Maybe you don't use the good social media ...


3

Good UX ensures that things work in specific contexts for specific users. Things that work on one site for one set of users come with no broad guarantees. See Should You Copy a Famous Site's Design? by Jakob Nielson.


2

I think you should allow your breadcrumbs to show only the hierarchical view of your site , not how you reached there, which is summarized in the browser's history (at least if you made your site bookmarkable). As usability consultant Jakob Nielsen says here: Offering users a Hansel-and-Gretel-style history trail is basically useless, because it simply ...


2

The exact answer depends on your users (who are they and what services are the likely to be signed up for?) and your use case (you wouldn't want Facebook login on a business site, for example). If you want to research this, it is easy to find demographic information for social media sites. For example, take a look at this PewResearch report. Ultimately, ...


2

Re Question 3 - Getting more info on users: let them add this voluntarily and progressively ( A bit like Linkedin does - with a '% completed' bar which pops up to remind the user from time to time ) If you force people to hand over info they will either go away or just make stuff up.


2

Sending email verifications with link inside seem to be the most used and accurate way to prevent from non-human registrations. As part of the core of your website related to social networking, IMHO allowing non-verified users navigate with a top bar as a reminder to activate their account would probably bother the website usability discouraging them to ...


2

I think @tohster answer covers photo usage quite well. So my answer will expand on the subject from a different angle. There are numerous examples of profile photos used within ERP and enterprise solutions in general. For example: Microsoft outlook uses senders photos in email headers and that looks like the mock-up below: Another example could be ...


2

This would most likely add much more confusion than any benefit it would add, as the current standard for social networks is that there is 1 profile picture for each user that is used everywhere. However, if you would like to give more views of the user, then you could adopt a system similar to what Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ do where the user has a ...


2

The principle you want to leverage, here, is called social proof. I noticed that the experts at user-experience consultancy NN/g discuss this in their article, Social proof in the user experience. This article gives a quick overview and, in the last few paragraphs, provides links to other authors and research for in-depth reading. You might like to read ...


1

For your specific scenario, there are many benefits and really can't see why NOT to use them. Basically, you want to have user's reviews, so while users are not the focal point, they're an important aspect of your site, if not THE MOST IMPORTANT. and this is NOT an exageration. I assume your app is oriented to sell. Now, with apps like yours, I can find 100 ...


1

It's worth remembering that while every design/dev decision impacts the user experience, not every decision can be rationalized from a UX perspective. There's no easily-findable explanation by the creators of Instagram of why there's no zooming. Constraints and the Creative Process This is speculation, but it's based in logic. Instagram is a tool that ...


1

Well, as a matter of fact, if well done, it's a quite good idea. For starters, you should NEVER use a random picture. Instead, let the user create an album of rotating profile pictures to avoid showing unwanted pictures. With this, you can use some nice tricks to give your site a knack. For example, create a profile picture competition where your users can ...


1

I have not tested this. But, design logic would say yes, inline links should work better on average. Many twitter links have been shortened so it's difficult to tell what the contents of the link are. This creates hesitation for the user because she has to figure out whether to click the link. Users will typically try to figure out what the link ...


1

I don't think users should edit their posts in any other app which isn't the official one (or something from third part that replaces it), because I think it could be confused. But in that case, have you thought about the possibility to implement it as native system extension, like in iOs? The user could upload its photo to your website with a caption, and ...


1

To answer your first question, I don't think it's necessary to allow users to edit statuses/tweets for FB and Twitter. But, that does depend on what your app is trying to achieve. As another suggestion, why not make it all the same thing? In other words, create one text area where a user can input a caption to their photo/video. Whatever they put in that ...


1

You can check the trustworthiness of your product and service. If users are choosing e-mail registration, there can be a trust issue. It may not be the company itself, but that the contextual information is important for users. As in the context, a user can enter a job application site with LinkedIn account and a person may not want to use their Facebook ...


1

To answer your question, I will have to make an assumption based on perceived business goals. The assumption is that the company would like to know more about their users without the requirement of filling out an in depth account profile. I believe the design to be sound, however the focus may need to be on your messaging. If you were to provide messaging ...


1

The short answer is it depends. On a basic website with a handful of pages, breadcrumbs are certainly unnecessary. But on larger sites (especially reference and documentation sites), breadcrumbs are extremely useful for navigation and orientation—one might even say they're downright necessary. The hard part is determining whether your site is large enough to ...



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