Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

107

We ran a quick user test and found that more people were signing up with their emails If you trust your test, then you should trust your users and design a solution that meets their desires. We are trying to encourage users to connect with their Facebook/Twitter accounts instead Why is that? Do you have sound reasoning behind this in that it will ...


17

The only advantage that I see as a user (for sites that I don't actually want to use in combination with twitter/facebook) is that it is quicker to log in with an existing account. As such you may want to structure it like so: Log in with existing account (can be social media or email) vs Register new account


10

A major distinction is that you can usually see who 'likes' what, where-as upvotes are anonymous. This is why the 'like' is mostly a social interaction. It's there to communicate to your peers that you approve of something or to show appreciation – sometimes it's not even the content that gets liked, but the act of posting by that particular person ...


7

I generally avoid signing up to random websites with Facebook, because I don't want those sites posting junk to my Facebook profile. One recent exception was Fallen London, which has a link saying "Read our civilised social media policy" right next to the "create a free account" -> "sign in with Facebook" link. The linked policy says things like "It's your ...


5

I trust facebook.com (sort of), so I put information on there such as my likes. I don't trust just any old site I stumble across on the Internet. So there's no way that I'm going to register for your application with my Facebook account. However, after some use, I may find that I do trust your application. Then I might be ready to click "Connect with ...


4

I don't understand why you want to change the user habit for the sign up? (business goals?) Sign up with social media is just an alternative for the user. Moreover, your test tells you that your users prefer email. Maybe, you would have to ask users why they prefer this solution instead of social media accounts? Maybe you don't use the good social media ...


3

From the user point of view The word chosen doesn't create much difference in user behavior. Such actions are motivated on an emotional level, and while users are very good at recognizing the valence of their emotion (is it positive or negative), they are not very distinguishing in what exactly they feel about an object. For example, if you have decided ...


2

I think you should allow your breadcrumbs to show only the hierarchical view of your site , not how you reached there, which is summarized in the browser's history (at least if you made your site bookmarkable). As usability consultant Jakob Nielsen says here: Offering users a Hansel-and-Gretel-style history trail is basically useless, because it simply ...


2

The exact answer depends on your users (who are they and what services are the likely to be signed up for?) and your use case (you wouldn't want Facebook login on a business site, for example). If you want to research this, it is easy to find demographic information for social media sites. For example, take a look at this PewResearch report. Ultimately, ...


2

Re Question 3 - Getting more info on users: let them add this voluntarily and progressively ( A bit like Linkedin does - with a '% completed' bar which pops up to remind the user from time to time ) If you force people to hand over info they will either go away or just make stuff up.


2

Sending email verifications with link inside seem to be the most used and accurate way to prevent from non-human registrations. As part of the core of your website related to social networking, IMHO allowing non-verified users navigate with a top bar as a reminder to activate their account would probably bother the website usability discouraging them to ...


1

You can check the trustworthiness of your product and service. If users are choosing e-mail registration, there can be a trust issue. It may not be the company itself, but that the contextual information is important for users. As in the context, a user can enter a job application site with LinkedIn account and a person may not want to use their Facebook ...


1

To answer your question, I will have to make an assumption based on perceived business goals. The assumption is that the company would like to know more about their users without the requirement of filling out an in depth account profile. I believe the design to be sound, however the focus may need to be on your messaging. If you were to provide messaging ...


1

In addition to prev answer by Michal can add that size of avatar may depends also on main related social network. For example if your app be oriented to work with FB or use social login by FB then better to use FB size of avatars, etc. More information about social media sizes you can take there ( 2014 Social Media Image Sizes: A User’s Guide for Graphic ...


1

It is different case by case and it depands on the location and the importance of the avatar in the specific situation. The highest importance is probably in the user profile screens. In this detail screens, users expect larger and more detailed picture. Can be higher than 120-180px. Another good place to use big avatar is list app (contacts or messaging ...


1

Generally speaking, a 'like' means that you like the post of subject matter, but don't necessarily recommend it. An 'upvote' is generally used when there are a large number of replies, questions, responses, or items that need to be ordered. The upvote means that the reader thinks that that piece of information is important and deserves to be seen first.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible