Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

107

We ran a quick user test and found that more people were signing up with their emails If you trust your test, then you should trust your users and design a solution that meets their desires. We are trying to encourage users to connect with their Facebook/Twitter accounts instead Why is that? Do you have sound reasoning behind this in that it will ...


36

Breadcrumbs Rock! And I think you have a personal bias against them rather then making a clear observation about their use. I notice none of the big players (StackExchange, Facebook, Google, YouTube) use breadcrumbs. StackExchange uses tags. Those are like breadcrumbs, but it's an associated way rather then structural. Facebook uses AJAX inplace ...


27

Siri seems to be the spiritual but not functional successor to Clippy. A major difference is that people request Siri's help whereas Clippy imposed help upon you. Another interesting thing is that Clippy is an Embodied Agent. For decades people have thought "How cool would it be if using your computer was like talking to a person". From that thought they ...


17

The only advantage that I see as a user (for sites that I don't actually want to use in combination with twitter/facebook) is that it is quicker to log in with an existing account. As such you may want to structure it like so: Log in with existing account (can be social media or email) vs Register new account


15

The three lines represent a menu as several links stacked on top of each other. If not already a convention - it is very close to become a cross plattform convention representing a menu. Take a look at this image search on Google: mobile menu button, and see that this is the most used representation for a menu on a mobile device. And looking closely this is ...


11

I do not think this is a secret design. Actually, this is a principle that may be inherited from newspapers or magazines: It would be impossible to read articles if they had not that three or four columns layout, just because your eyes would lose on which line you are reading and which is the next to read. This minimizes eyebal movements while reading. ...


10

A major distinction is that you can usually see who 'likes' what, where-as upvotes are anonymous. This is why the 'like' is mostly a social interaction. It's there to communicate to your peers that you approve of something or to show appreciation – sometimes it's not even the content that gets liked, but the act of posting by that particular person ...


9

To me, the biggest problem with Clippy was that it was so damn patronising. As if it knew what you were wanting to do, and just had to help you. I did have it running, mainly because the animations kept me amused ( I am a simple person really ), not for the advice or comments, which I turned off. And, as @Ben says, it interrupted you doing x to tell you it ...


8

I generally avoid signing up to random websites with Facebook, because I don't want those sites posting junk to my Facebook profile. One recent exception was Fallen London, which has a link saying "Read our civilised social media policy" right next to the "create a free account" -> "sign in with Facebook" link. The linked policy says things like "It's your ...


6

Science: I've read a study last year, saying that the younger generation is unable to differentiate between communication channels: they do remember what did they send to who, but they just can't remember how did they send it. A quick informal survey on 25-35 year old power users (geeks, hipsters, you know, what friends shall a developer have?) confirmed ...


6

Having two lists could create difficulties in scrolling. Also it's not a good way to divide friends on those who have the game and those who have no. The reason is in what drives me to play with someone. "A-ha! Is she so clever? Let's see!". So don't build the barrier. The better way is to display all the friends, adding clear signs of whether someone has ...


6

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=usernames+vs+real+names Sorry! I just had to :-) The article Usernames vs. Real Names on Your Community: Pros and Cons says the following: Real Names Pros (vs. Usernames) Increased accountability. When people have their contributions tied to their real name, they are more likely to consider the repercussions of their ...


6

I trust facebook.com (sort of), so I put information on there such as my likes. I don't trust just any old site I stumble across on the Internet. So there's no way that I'm going to register for your application with my Facebook account. However, after some use, I may find that I do trust your application. Then I might be ready to click "Connect with ...


5

If you are only going to show it to them, then it is fine to show it. If someone has signed up with a facebook account, they would have already agreed to allow you to see their profile pic. If you are going to make it publicly viewable, then it is not okay to do it unless you get explicit permission from them first. You could by default not show it and ...


5

99% of the users didn't know how to use the features that were already there in the previous version, and had ZERO desire to learn something new and different much less get bugged constantly about how they were doing things that were wrong to begin with. They knew what they wanted to do and were doing how they wanted to do it. In their minds, Clippy caused ...


5

I think it depends on how you have organized your site's data structure. If your site presents information that is hierarchical in nature then breadcrumbs can help navigate 'up' a level to similar data from a leaf node. of course, it's possible to organize some data into a hierarchical manner even if it isn't necessary. Nowadays though, sites are trying ...


5

The majority of responsive websites (such as Starbucks, Facebook or Path) use the three horizontal stripes icon. An alternative could be the grid icon (depending on how you decide to visualize your menu items) or the three horizontal stripes of different lenghts with a dot, representing “table of contents”. This article lists some interesting solutions: ...


5

I worked on a social network recently and debated exactly this issue. We came to the same conclusion. Here's why: It provides consistency of experience. Users expect to be able to comment, like, or share posts. So removing one of these actions for your own post can create frustration because of the lack of consistency. Don't penalize users for posting ...


4

It doesn't matter. Pick a unique, easily-recognized icon. Put it in your interface in a place where people will click on it, guessing its approximate meaning. Make it easy to discover, and safe-looking so people are willing to chance a click on it. Make its meaning discoverable: When the user hovers, tell them it's for marking things 'interesting' and ...


4

Taking Clifford Nass' premise that human-computer interaction is —unconsciously— like human-human interaction, we can conclude that in designing human-computer interfaces we should use the same Human-Human interaction paradigms. Some examples of this being a good approach are: Apple's Siri, which has been a big hype in human-computer interacion. ...


4

In my experience breadcrumbs are useful on sites that have some depth in the page hierarchy. The trail shows where the user is in the site hierarchy. Not only that, it also reveals nearby possibly-related content. Third, it's good for search engines so they understand where in the site they are, and can show context of search results. Use of a breadcrumb ...


4

If you need it to start, you need it ALL the time -- none of this "upon launch" nonsense. Not everyone will find your site at the same time, and what's a good intro before will be a good intro later. The real question you should ask is "Do I need [X] to explain the service?" If so, you're going to need it all along, and it's just a matter of whether or not ...


4

If you're talking about a big pop up as soon as a user loads your site, I would completely advise against it. Unexpected pop ups associate themselves to bad advertisement practices and would most likely frustrate users. I would much rather see a well presented header with a "learn about us" button or an introductory video.


4

In the U.S., a few years ago when social media was starting to boom, advertisers would often display a logo and state something like "Find us on Facebook" in TV and print media. However they started to realize that fan pages and other non-official profiles made that confusing, so then they started displaying full URL's (i.e., www.facebook.com/CoolCompany) ...


4

To add to those mentioned above, offering the option of usernames allows those who are worried about being the target of abuse to participate. There are several groups of people (I belong to two such groups) who are routinely subject to negativity online when it is known that they belong in the target group(s). Such treatment ranges from mild offense to ...


4

OpenID http://openid.net/developers/ OpenID is a decentralized authentication protocol that makes it easy for people to sign up and access web accounts. Participate and join one of these active OpenID Work Groups Account Chooser Work Group Backplane Protocol Work Group Connect Work Group OpenID plugins and modules are available ...


4

I don't understand why you want to change the user habit for the sign up? (business goals?) Sign up with social media is just an alternative for the user. Moreover, your test tells you that your users prefer email. Maybe, you would have to ask users why they prefer this solution instead of social media accounts? Maybe you don't use the good social media ...


4

Yes! (but it's not what you think) Let's start with the downside of using profile pictures: Visually they can really clutter up lists and layouts. They are not terribly communicative. For enterprise applications a name is a lot more functional than a picture. You have to figure out how to get users to upload photos without making it a hurdle or an ...


3

If they are too many tabs then "Maybe" buttons are good, otherwise tabs are much more intuitive when it comes to presenting the same data in different (and predefined) filtering logic likes 'Most Watched', 'Recently Added', 'Top 10', 'All'.


3

Here is my opinion about the layout and why it works. First, we as humans tend to read from left-to-right/right-to-left. We all know that. Long line lengths are bad for reading, but that doesn't necessarily apply to youtube, unless you enjoy reading the comments while listening to the video. Even if we take into account our reading direction, that doesn't ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible