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30

Breadcrumbs Rock! And I think you have a personal bias against them rather then making a clear observation about their use. I notice none of the big players (StackExchange, Facebook, Google, YouTube) use breadcrumbs. StackExchange uses tags. Those are like breadcrumbs, but it's an associated way rather then structural. Facebook uses AJAX inplace ...


27

Siri seems to be the spiritual but not functional successor to Clippy. A major difference is that people request Siri's help whereas Clippy imposed help upon you. Another interesting thing is that Clippy is an Embodied Agent. For decades people have thought "How cool would it be if using your computer was like talking to a person". From that thought they ...


15

The three lines represent a menu as several links stacked on top of each other. If not already a convention - it is very close to become a cross plattform convention representing a menu. Take a look at this image search on Google: mobile menu button, and see that this is the most used representation for a menu on a mobile device. And looking closely this is ...


11

I do not think this is a secret design. Actually, this is a principle that may be inherited from newspapers or magazines: It would be impossible to read articles if they had not that three or four columns layout, just because your eyes would lose on which line you are reading and which is the next to read. This minimizes eyebal movements while reading. ...


9

To me, the biggest problem with Clippy was that it was so damn patronising. As if it knew what you were wanting to do, and just had to help you. I did have it running, mainly because the animations kept me amused ( I am a simple person really ), not for the advice or comments, which I turned off. And, as @Ben says, it interrupted you doing x to tell you it ...


9

A major distinction is that you can usually see who 'likes' what, where-as upvotes are anonymous. This is why the 'like' is mostly a social interaction. It's there to communicate to your peers that you approve of something or to show appreciation – sometimes it's not even the content that gets liked, but the act of posting by that particular person ...


6

Science: I've read a study last year, saying that the younger generation is unable to differentiate between communication channels: they do remember what did they send to who, but they just can't remember how did they send it. A quick informal survey on 25-35 year old power users (geeks, hipsters, you know, what friends shall a developer have?) confirmed ...


6

The majority of responsive websites (such as Starbucks, Facebook or Path) use the three horizontal stripes icon. An alternative could be the grid icon (depending on how you decide to visualize your menu items) or the three horizontal stripes of different lenghts with a dot, representing “table of contents”. This article lists some interesting solutions: ...


6

Having two lists could create difficulties in scrolling. Also it's not a good way to divide friends on those who have the game and those who have no. The reason is in what drives me to play with someone. "A-ha! Is she so clever? Let's see!". So don't build the barrier. The better way is to display all the friends, adding clear signs of whether someone has ...


6

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=usernames+vs+real+names Sorry! I just had to :-) The article Usernames vs. Real Names on Your Community: Pros and Cons says the following: Real Names Pros (vs. Usernames) Increased accountability. When people have their contributions tied to their real name, they are more likely to consider the repercussions of their ...


5

If you are only going to show it to them, then it is fine to show it. If someone has signed up with a facebook account, they would have already agreed to allow you to see their profile pic. If you are going to make it publicly viewable, then it is not okay to do it unless you get explicit permission from them first. You could by default not show it and ...


5

99% of the users didn't know how to use the features that were already there in the previous version, and had ZERO desire to learn something new and different much less get bugged constantly about how they were doing things that were wrong to begin with. They knew what they wanted to do and were doing how they wanted to do it. In their minds, Clippy caused ...


5

I think it depends on how you have organized your site's data structure. If your site presents information that is hierarchical in nature then breadcrumbs can help navigate 'up' a level to similar data from a leaf node. of course, it's possible to organize some data into a hierarchical manner even if it isn't necessary. Nowadays though, sites are trying ...


4

It doesn't matter. Pick a unique, easily-recognized icon. Put it in your interface in a place where people will click on it, guessing its approximate meaning. Make it easy to discover, and safe-looking so people are willing to chance a click on it. Make its meaning discoverable: When the user hovers, tell them it's for marking things 'interesting' and ...


4

Taking Clifford Nass' premise that human-computer interaction is —unconsciously— like human-human interaction, we can conclude that in designing human-computer interfaces we should use the same Human-Human interaction paradigms. Some examples of this being a good approach are: Apple's Siri, which has been a big hype in human-computer interacion. ...


4

In my experience breadcrumbs are useful on sites that have some depth in the page hierarchy. The trail shows where the user is in the site hierarchy. Not only that, it also reveals nearby possibly-related content. Third, it's good for search engines so they understand where in the site they are, and can show context of search results. Use of a breadcrumb ...


4

If you need it to start, you need it ALL the time -- none of this "upon launch" nonsense. Not everyone will find your site at the same time, and what's a good intro before will be a good intro later. The real question you should ask is "Do I need [X] to explain the service?" If so, you're going to need it all along, and it's just a matter of whether or not ...


4

If you're talking about a big pop up as soon as a user loads your site, I would completely advise against it. Unexpected pop ups associate themselves to bad advertisement practices and would most likely frustrate users. I would much rather see a well presented header with a "learn about us" button or an introductory video.


4

In the U.S., a few years ago when social media was starting to boom, advertisers would often display a logo and state something like "Find us on Facebook" in TV and print media. However they started to realize that fan pages and other non-official profiles made that confusing, so then they started displaying full URL's (i.e., www.facebook.com/CoolCompany) ...


4

To add to those mentioned above, offering the option of usernames allows those who are worried about being the target of abuse to participate. There are several groups of people (I belong to two such groups) who are routinely subject to negativity online when it is known that they belong in the target group(s). Such treatment ranges from mild offense to ...


4

OpenID http://openid.net/developers/ OpenID is a decentralized authentication protocol that makes it easy for people to sign up and access web accounts. Participate and join one of these active OpenID Work Groups Account Chooser Work Group Backplane Protocol Work Group Connect Work Group OpenID plugins and modules are available ...


3

If they are too many tabs then "Maybe" buttons are good, otherwise tabs are much more intuitive when it comes to presenting the same data in different (and predefined) filtering logic likes 'Most Watched', 'Recently Added', 'Top 10', 'All'.


3

Here is my opinion about the layout and why it works. First, we as humans tend to read from left-to-right/right-to-left. We all know that. Long line lengths are bad for reading, but that doesn't necessarily apply to youtube, unless you enjoy reading the comments while listening to the video. Even if we take into account our reading direction, that doesn't ...


3

I don't suppose this is a question that will see definitive answers unless we wrangle designers for the sites you mention. In response to the three questions, I would venture "yes", "yes", "no", but I would also propose some other possible explanations not represented: We're talking about user experience, of course, but a designer is a sort of user. We ...


3

While there some usability concerns around line-lengths, I think there are two main reasons why this layout is so popular. Design control. Designers have much more control over how the website will look using the popular fixed-width, centered layout as page elements will not move around or change size at the mercy of the users browser window size. Ease of ...


3

I'd call it a post with comments, or with a comment-thread.


3

The scenario mentioned in mockup will work well in your case. The comment is visible just after posting and will automatically hide after 5 seconds (can hide with an animation) and the link to number of replies can be highlighted. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


3

Clippy's problems: 1) Invasive 2) Visually unappealing 3) Lacked UI integration with any of the other Office features To make it better: 1) Have Clippy be an obvious feature that can be enabled or disabled. Preferably the first time you run the program (and not with every new session). 2) Instead of randomly appearing and floating in the document, make ...


3

Clifford Nass says that Clippy behaves socially inappropriate, as it suggests the same help over and over again, effectively communicating that he "sees" the user for the first time. So instead of improving its algorithms to make it more intelligent, he used a different social pattern: whenever a user answered "No" to his question "Was this help useful?", ...


3

I would try an on/off light bulb icon. I think it differentiates the element in a visual way, and light bulb is associated with idea.



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