Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

18

I added event tracking to the carousel navigation elements on our public site. Those that navigated the carousel overwhelmingly used the main side arrows. less than 10% used the bottom secondary navigation arrows. And practically no one <.5% clicked the dots. Dots may have some purpose of indicating how many slides (does that matter to people?) but ...


10

I find that dots are useful for showing progress, but they're way to small click targets to be usable for navigation. They're probably best suited for mobile applications like the iPhone home screen where a swipe is the means of changing slides: If you do decide to build a carousel, make your nav buttons BIG. Allow keyboard navigation for desktop users ...


4

Some quick suggestions based less on research and more on personal pet peeves: Ensure that the person visiting the site can control the slideshow Ensure that the navigation dots (like those in the posted example) reside outside of the photo content so that they are clearly visible no matter what photo is showing (unlike those in the posted example) Ensure ...


3

In case one - the slider is each handle's functionality. The control is a range selector. If there is only one slider handle, the control is a value selector. Slider has, as you stated, a broad meaning. Everything that can slide (move from point A to B in some kind of continuous way) is, by it's function, a slider. If you mention slider and is talking ...


3

Here are some reputable research articles you can reference. Not all of them pertain to your specific scenario but the fundamental principle of being consistent in UI design stands: http://www.nngroup.com/articles/top-10-ia-mistakes/ Navigation exists to help users, not to be a puzzle in its own right. Users should be able to understand it immediately, ...


3

I think the goal of a training is to engage the trainee. This could be done through interactivity, but please avoid making interactivity the goal. Often we talk about such effects in UX and psychology, but a perfectly designed interaction pattern can never compensate for bad quality content. Some talks (pure video, for example, TED talks / Coursera) can be ...


3

The few articles I could find states laser pointers are not exactly user friendly for people with color blindness since most laser pointers are red or green and people with those disability will be unable to follow it. To quote this article: If you are not affected by color blindness the little red or green spot which is produced by a laser pointer can ...


3

When you have a small amount of pages, like on your example, 5 page, that can fit in dots inside the content then you better use dots. The advantage is that the user can move quickly from page to page, and have better knowledge of where it is. When there's a large number of pages, eg imagine there are 12 dots, then it is better with the arrows. Many dots ...


3

I feel your pain! I say just don't use one :) This article explains why sliders are a bad idea with great details and examples. Basically: Their movement distracts users away from your content People glaze over things that look like banners They have terrible usability--as you mention, they always seem to move just as you're trying to read something! ...


3

Most people seem to agree on the common sense of a maximum around 5 images, but agree that less is better where possible. Jakob Neilsen suggests 5 because: it’s unlikely users will engage with more than that. It can be taxing to swipe through many frames on a mobile device, and it’s difficult for users to recognize topics they have already viewed when a ...


3

My main comment on the slide show is the content itself, it's an advert or at least reads like one therefore likely to be ignored in itself and subsequent content probably also. This problem is more of an issue if the slide show automatically steps to the next frame as this further adds to the likeness in behaviour to adverts. Of course the content may just ...


2

Assuming you're "scrolling" or sliding the slides around it makes most sense to display all slides between point A and B; that's just how real-world objects like film reels work. This presents a problem however when you start scrolling between large amounts of slides. Try to keep a delay of under 500ms to avoid being too long and showy, and avoid too short ...


2

This is what comes to my mind: Choose the transition type that fits the overall mood and the purpose of the web site. If you want to communicate a feeling of for example smoothness or luxury maybe a opacity or crossfade transition could enhance that mood. If you want to communicate a cool or upbeat feeling maybe a 3D flip transition is the best way ...


2

ok (referring to my previous comment above) so if it's just a few big photos with some text like for a portfolio or for a gallery website, then I would definitely go for the dots. Quickly some thoughts - or actually a loose list of pros and cons: Dots: not very practicable for larger number of slides (probably max. 7) abstractness good for slides that ...


2

Auto-forwarding slideshows (AKA carousels) are problematic on many levels. Jakob Nielsen recently published a study that showed critical information is often missed when it's part of an auto-forwarded slideshow: http://www.nngroup.com/articles/auto-forwarding/ Beyond that they're often filled with gratuitous items with low information content and people ...


1

Being text, be sure that you provide enough time to read it. If there are images, consider one or two seconds to look at them. For deciding how much time is needed, you have to do some tests, get some people to read each image aloud, measure the time it takes to them to get it done and use that time. Reading aloud is slower than reading in silence, thatś ...


1

I haven't seen such a treatment of a next button when on the last page. From a user's perspective, I would get very confused because when my eyes see that the last/next button is gray when I know it used to be black, my brain automatically thinks I have reached the end of a search result set or some sort of series. If I wanted to go to the next slide show, ...


1

I think you've certainly hit the meaning of your first case. I'd add that sliders are more often horizontal in orientation than vertical, but you can find vertical instances. "Slider" is also a reference to the control of a button, bar or control-point that moves along a pre-defined path to select an option or value. Sliders are often used to reduce user ...


1

I found a similar question for mobile sites, which unfortunately also did not have a definitive answer: How many photos should be in a slideshow for mobile on page load? As I expected, the answer given for this question also indicates that the maximum number of slides should be as many as an average user would view at one time. I would expect this number ...


1

Generally you should load as few as you expect the average user to view in one session. This might well be one photo (or as many photos as necessary as to fill a visual preview carousel if you use one). I'd air on the side of caution and start tracking real-world usage of the app as soon as possible. Until you have some data, err on the side of few photos, ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible