Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Check OpenAjax. Here you can find an example of how an accessible slider widget: http://www.oaa-accessibility.org/example/32/ Basically, you can say your slider component is accessible if every user can complete the task of picking values from a range. To summarize, what you should add to your components is: Labels and descriptions: Users with blindness ...


2

I believe that what this really boils down to is that you are using the wrong control for the job. Most often when designing an interface, if you can't easily map an input to a certain control, it's not the correct control to be using. In this case while a slider might look more streamlined and attractive, you've noticed their limitation; They exist to ...


0

This obviously depends a lot on the game itself. Think of the pace of the game. How fast do players need to locate and use the controls? If speed and skill is part of the gameplay it is better to have the controls designed and positioned to be used often and fast, and not having too much of them. Sometimes a game’s complexity is the game itself. A strategy ...


0

Repeated elements can be clustered with another structure. Let's say you have: Archers, Spear-man, Swordsman and Catapult You can first select - a group of unit - decide on the ratio between base/bunker with the amount of resources. If you have visual cue for each group of soldier on your screen; you do not need four sliders at all. Of course, the new ...


0

In the physical world, one term that could applicable is potentiometer. It's typically a knob or slider and the further you turn it, the the higher or lower the resistance within. Note that these are difficult to implement in a virtual UI. Knobs and sliders are great physical objects to interact with*. They can be a real pain to interact with via a ...


1

The basic functionality sounds to me like what would be in the physical world called a jog dial. There are two basic types of wheels. One type has no stops and can be spun the entire way around, because it is a relative rotary encoder. This type depends on tracking the actual motion of the dial: the faster it spins forward or back, the faster it ...


2

In general, sliders only provide a better user experience in cases where the exact value isn't as important as relative value. The classic example being a volume control where the sound volume increases or decreases as the slider thumb is adjusted to values like a little bit of sound, all the way up, no sound, etc. If generic relative values were okay ...


0

You could use animations to represent the ticks. Imagine a pronounced "ease in- out- " type of acceleration/deceleration curve. The slider control would slow down as you approach the spot a tick mark would be, and speed up as you move away from one. This would mimic the building of a physical friction you might experience with a physical notched slider. ...


8

You can use dynamic tooltip both to visualize the specificity of the control, and to show feedback for the slider control, see the picture: There is a scale with the fixed points within the tooltip. The left and right next points a bit transparent close to edges and the dots convey the continuity of the scale. If desired, "major" tick marks can be ...


3

It's not just visually-impared users you should be considering here. Think of users who only use keyboard, or have broken their wrist, or all sorts of users. Accessibility ≠ only blind users. But anyway, to answer your question - you have a text field in your first example. That is the approach to take. The slider should be an enhancement to the form, it ...



Top 50 recent answers are included