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9

There isn't a single skinned application I didn't end up hating. Seriously, the skins I've seen are there purely to make the application look "richer" than a normal Windows application and ends up doing nothing more than suck up memory and CPU in order to look like a pig with lipstick on and eventually fail with paint issues. I loathe skinned applications ...


6

I've seen these applications for skinning: Distributor/Customer Branding Feelgood applications Bobify Portability Distributor Branding gives the final user familiar names and looks - e.g. for support we use a remote desktop access tool that is branded with our name and logo. This makes the tool better integrate with our software, and the customer knows ...


5

Google calls their seasonal holiday logos "doodles", and in the absence of a better term, I'll refer to them as doodles, too. This may seem like fluff, but it occurred to me that our call-centre employees—users of the software on which I currently work—might benefit from doodles that reflect our employers' current marketing campaign. Especially when the ...


4

The 'skinning' concept is something MS has pushed throughout most of the .net frameworks and IDEs. The main concern I have with it is that most of the default themes MS provides are terrible. They tend to lack meaningful emphasis, over-use contrast, and just tend to generally add to chart junk. Personally, enabling custom skinning of your UI should be the ...


3

Adapting the UI for the holidays serves probably very well the online retailers. The best example is Amazon.com which decorates every year its UI for Christmas. For my part, I tend to spend more when I'm in a "Christmas mood". For instance, as soon as I decorate my apartment for this time of the year, I'm sure my spending behaviors change. Maybe the ...


3

One of the fun ones is the VLC app icon (a road safety cone). In December, it dons a santa hat. Subtlety is the key to making it successful. You probably don't want to cover your home page with a cheesy snow-globe effect, for instance.


3

Well, for users with visual impairments it may be a deciding factor in whether or not they use your software. If windows themes are not applied to your software, it is important to offer high contrast settings. Anything beyond high contrast themes is probably just an initiative of your marketing department, but I haven't seen any research on cosmetic ...


3

The usability of an application shouldn't really be affected by the skin applied. If options are hard to find/use with the default UI skin then you've got problems with your application. If you competitors support custom skins then having the same for your application is probably seen as important for marketing reasons. You don't want your sales hit because ...


2

World of Warcraft Default UI: One of the many ways to skin it: Most of the custom UIs aren't very good in the sense that they're visually attractive but clumsy and not particularly more efficient than the vanilla WoW UI, which after 6 years has held up very well. If you look hard, though, there are some custom UIs which improve efficiency for advanced ...


2

If you want to learn, I think you should also look at some specially bad examples so you know what not to do. Check out this post on SO. And here are two examples of what I think are really nicely designed custom UI's. They are very easy to grasp, clear in how they do things and look nice (although that is more subjective). Here's Artrage: And here's ...


1

The problem with your design is, way too bold text , very dark shadows plus colors are not that awesome try FlatUI colors Moreover head over to Dribble(tag flat ui) you can find a ton of UI design inspirations there.


1

I can't refer to any exact science on that. My analysis is like that: if you assign automatically the winning team's color, that would be an award to the winning team. most ppl like variation unless it is deterring or confusing. as in your case, all of the icons or other staffs are remaining same except color tone, it will be enjoyable. However, you also ...


1

Another music player/ripper/manager that has skins is Media Monkey. A page showing some of the skins available can be found here One plus point is that skins are completely optional ;) You can flick a switch and the application uses the default OS "skin". On a personal note I like this option as this is the UI I prefer. Skins are easy to install - just ...


1

Custom skins is a major feature of Winamp, a free desktop MP3 player. A lot of the skin designs seem to mimic the designers perception of audio equipment. Most of the emphasis of the skins is on aesthetics. Default skin (left) and some custom skins:


1

One advantage could be to increase interest in the application by creating a user community around UI skinning. There are communities around skinning both WoW and Winamp, which are seen as good examples of custom/skinned user interfaces. The skinning is mainly around app specific controls and layout rather then replacing OS UI. The customization allows ...


1

Users like skinnable user interfaces because they find them fun. At our small office (4 other people), two employees use custom skins on their Firefox browser. One is a huge Lakers fan, the other is quite an artsy person; the Firefox skins fully reflect that. IMO, skinnable user interfaces are OK up to a point. Some apps cross the line from providing fun ...


1

Hey, I'm starting a new project that is doing just that. First to answer your questions: No, other products in our space don't support theming. Not necessarily. Our reasons fit into some of peterchen's answer, but I'll go a little deeper. My company is in a large, but still niche market. Our user interfaces have traditionally fit in the line of ...



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