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36

Start working on your 10,000 hours any way you can. That means reading up on material concerning the field, diving in and applying for a job, hacking away at something as a hobby, keeping up with industry developments, paying attention to the thought leaders (eg. Jakob Nielsen, Jared Spool, Steve Krug, etc) and asking lots of questions. So I'd expect to see ...


13

To me, elegance is the combination of three features: Simplicity, coherence, and powerfulness. This can be applied to a design concept, aesthetic appearance, interaction design, and underlying code. Simplicity. Simplicity means few elements. It could be a concept that’s easy to explain in a few words, a visual design with few colors, lines, and shapes, an ...


8

Mostly agree with what Rahul said - but I'd like to especially emphasise one thing. Practice doing user experience work. Practice it a lot. Reading blogs, books, papers, and courses are all great. But knowing how to apply that knowledge is a different thing. The real learning comes when you try and apply your knowledge, make mistakes, and fix 'em. You ...


8

I agree with Rahul, some very good points there. Having a solid background as a developer helps me a lot during my work as a user experience designer (I used to develop websites, but quickly moved to UXD). You know the techniques (and their limitations) you work with. In my opinion this helps you design (technically) realistic products that are possible ...


6

First, a caveat. This is an industry with extremely fuzzy terms for roles and job titles. What is a UX designer in one group, might be considered the UI designer in another. What is considered the UI designer in one group, might be considered the lead UI developer in another. Etc. So, grain of salt and all that... Secondly...umm...shoot...another caveat. ;) ...


5

I work with a LOT of developers. They are highly intelligent and have a certain logical mindset that makes them very good at being developers. It's easy to believe that everyone thinks like you do, which I can assure you they do not. In addition to what the others have said, I would suggest that you spend time watching users. Get inside their heads to see ...


5

Unfortunately some companies are too cheap to invest in usability testing. This is not to say that they don't beta test or provide multiple options for a particular layout or solution. It's just that some companies have limited resources and/or do not see the need to invest in usability testing. I work at one of these types of companies. It's not that they ...


2

Find the archetypes that lives within you: Trainer/Author Coder Lead Techonologist Then see how much percentage of these four archetypes occupy your attention when you are in your best flow. There are Branches in the Interaction Design disciplines... some of them relate more to strategic perspectives related to value proposition and business modeling ...


2

I've been attempting to navigate this transition for about five years, and I've learned a lot along the way. First, experience is almost everything. As mentioned in another answer, the 10,000 hours thing (although it's a Gladwell gimmick) is fairly good as a first approximation. But it matters what kind of experience you have. All of my experience is in ...


2

Generally and anecdotally, I've found that people that call themselves "designers" are more concerned with aesthetics and traditions that are derived from print and the study of graphic arts that predate the the personal computer. Of course today "designers" now have significant knowledge of interactivity and usability and have much exposure to concepts of ...


1

I think the best solution has largely to do with what you're trying to achieve by displaying this information. Is it like a resume where someone wants to just get across the message that they know a lot of different things? Or is the goal to more clearly show someone's relative experience between different skills? And how accurate does the comparison need ...


1

For me, elegant design has the following qualities: It accomplishes its purpose in the simplest way possible. It's easy to use and doesn't cause frustration. It's aesthetically pleasing. It elicits the desired emotions. It doesn't do anything unnecessary.


1

It is definitely subjective to a certain extent and perhaps the best way to understand it's intent is to ask for an example whenever someone mentions an elegant design. However, I think one can by default assume that elegant has the same connotations online as it does offline; as clean, minimal, and beautiful as possible.


1

The Dreyfus model assumes that the person is focused on learning. Software users are task oriented. A novice user will muddle through until they can complete exactly what they wanted to accomplish with the system. They are not focused on learning to use the system, just on completing the task. They don't look for better / more efficient ways of completing a ...


1

I don't see a grand difference between Design and UX, but I do see a difference between designing for yourself vs. designing for users -- namely, it's real easy to create something that pleases yourself, without that design being something in the best interests of your users. UX to me implies a bit of a butter zone between coding, design, and psychology. ...


1

The best way to make the transition, as adrianh has said, is to do it. If you're passionate and interested, it shows. So bug companies you respect for an internship. The might just say yes. Find out what they might need some help on. We had someone do that to us and we eventually gave her a job because she was so clearly passionate about user experience.



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