Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

216

It's a shame no one has mentioned the impact of the Mac OS X "Aqua" interface on all this. Aqua was the name Apple gave to the user interface style it introduced in Mac OS X. It changed the Mac's software from looking like this: …to looking like this: Here's Steve Jobs introducing it for the first time at MacWorld San Francisco 2000. As he says: ...


146

It's a big part of Skeuomorphism vs flat design, a debate about which Sacha Greif has a good writeup. Skeuomorphism like gloss, reflections and textures make things look like “real” objects, but all the fancy can increase cognitive load, and gives an unfortunate “samey” feel. The majority of iOS icons have the same or similar gloss effect on their icons, ...


73

An interesting read by John Gruber on the shift away from skeuomorphism makes the argument that increasing pixel density resolves some of the issues that gave rise to certain skeuomorphic practices like shadows and gradients: The trend away from skeuomorphic special effects in UI design is the beginning of the retina-resolution design era. Our designs no ...


36

This largely a question of design trends, but there are some UX aspects to it. Glossy icons and buttons were (arguably) mostly used to show affordance. It was also then used almost religiously in all Apple designs. Even today, most iOS icons are glossy by default. People don't neet to be shown some gloss or gradient to know that they can interact with ...


12

You need skeuomorphs for a new technology. It trumps OS consistency in that respect. But, above and beyond that, OS consistency is more important. Found an article which resonated with my views. Ignore the MS vs Apple thing. http://www.cultofmac.com/180084/where-microsoft-has-more-taste-than-apple/ Traditionally, skeuomorphic design has been used to ...


9

If the client really wants a typed "signature", and you're interested in making it look like a printed document, how about something like this? A highlighted signature box with a standard signature line and some instructional placeholder text. On clicking, the user gets a flashing cursor, a button to commit the change, and a way to cancel out of the ...


7

Might be a bit of a tangent, but this trend reminds me of the BBC announcing their new "digital" logo back in 1997. The big reasons they gave at the time were that the move from glossy to a simpler matt logo allowed the logo to work better at multiple resolutions and on multiple devices. It also compressed better which was a big deal with their website in ...


7

User interfaces are usable when they behave in the same way that a user would predict they behave. Skeuomorphism can be used to teach a user how a user interface will behave, for example, by making buttons pop out visually so it appears as if the right thing to do is to press on them. This is what Don Norman called affordances -- a pop-out button affords ...


6

Besides the techical evolution I think a major force is marketing. In order to distinguish the UI from competitors like Apple and Google, Microsoft uses the Modern UI to look modern and fancy. Here is a nice article that compares the paths Modern UI is coming from http://punchcut.com/perspectives/posts/windows-8-origin-story. Another aspect can be the grade ...


5

I can only speak from my own observations. People buy tablets and use them on the go. Internet on the go costs extra money depending on country and provider. Heavy websites load slower. Good designers think about how to keep performance and loading times low and conclude to move away from heavy bling bling buttons. Besides, Skeumorph designs have reached a ...


5

One word... Resolution We have only recently been able to see fonts as they appear in print, and so the design trends which have been prevalent in high print design/typography make more sense in the digital space now. Look at print design, specifically high-end work, now... show me the drop shadows, and gloss, generally, it's not there, it doesn't test ...


5

It's an age old balance between form and function. UX is trying to balance the two. You want something which is visually pleasing and "looks good" but also want something that conveys information quickly and efficiently and is easy to use. The Photoshop icon is really the best example. Sure the Feather looks cool, but what does that tell someone about ...


5

Interesting design, I haven't seen this before. I think credit card forms are so common that most people have few problems with them, but if you have the extra space for a form like this, I don't see why you shouldn't use this. One thing though, I would stick with a single text input field for card number, rather than a segmented group of four. The ...


5

In the context of UX/UI, Skeuomorphism is representing a digital interface in a way to replicate its analog cousin. 'Flat Design' is an aesthetic visual treatment. Your question is: which do people like? Well, that's a broad question and is going to depend entirely on the context of the particular interface you are building for the particular product. ...


4

I don't have studies, so in this sense my answer isn't a real answer, I just want to provide some historical context and uncover an important side of this topic as well. Historical context: In the end of the 90s, when UX was just about to be born (as our computing capacities erupted with screens with more than 256 colors and 640x480 pixels), one of the ...


4

I think first you have to understand the purpose of skeuomorphism and use it for the right reasons. Don't use it because you want to trick the user into thinking it's "real" and don't use it solely for aesthetic reasons. What is the purpose of skeuomorphic design? To convey functionality. Skeuomorphic Design Should Convey Functionality


4

For browser based UIs it's marginally more efficient and much more cross-browser compliant to build these 'flat' designs i.e. no drop shadows, bevels, gradients, rounded corners etc etc This doesn't make a a great deal of difference on a desktop / broadband / modern browser but on mobile devices where connections are slower, screens are smaller and browser ...


4

Why the sudden change? Broadly speaking, it is not a sudden change. Specific to MS, it is a bit of a sudden change. It's a design trend. Graphic design and UI design, like design in general follows aesthetic trends. In the case of MS's examples, as many have noted, Windows 8/Metro is being designed as a significant departure from their previous ...


3

I think the pros greatly outweigh the cons (if any). Using a credit card is both visually and user friendly. I see it gaining a lot of traction in the design community, check out this link that shows a design of what you are talking about on dribbble.com:


3

Skeuomorphism on the web or in computer UIs in general is not dead. The flat "Metro" has become trendy recently but it's really just a trend. Apple produced some poor (and rightly ridiculed) examples of skeuomorphism with the stitched leather on the calendar and such, and that type of skeuomorphism is on its way out. But more subtle uses of skeuomorphism ...


3

The question is probably a tricky one to answer. Even if you get the answer, it's not sure that what people "like" (in an aesthetic way) is the same thing as if it makes the system better (from an overall perspective with focus on the interaction design and UX). It's no doubt about the fact that a lot of systems are heading towards a flat design (Windows 8, ...


3

It's generally a tradeoff between ease of explanation and future flexibility. Apple use a bookshelf (or Newsstand) as the metaphor for their Newsstand as people already have a mental model for that in their heads. Hence it is a lot easier for their customers to understand. The down side of this is that there is no incremental way to change the pattern ...


3

I believe with all new technology, people compete to be the most intricate, the most complex, to demonstrate their knowledge of the latest trends. Whether it's Flash, jQuery, or glossy buttons, developers show one another their knowledge of the web by pushing it as far as it can go. Once that happens, the technology grows old, the competition stops, and ...


3

It's a psychological trick. Reflections were Apple's enormously influential way of communicating: technological advancement pleasant ux Flat (popularized but not created by Google) is a way of saying "we've moved beyond all the bling." It communicates: simplicity efficient ux It's nothing new (look to the international style design of the 50s and ...


3

Skeuomorphism did indeed become very fashionable with Apple and you are right that the purpose was to give the users a connection with objects of the real world by adding these textures. The use of skeumorphism is a matter of taste. Almost like if you use monochrome designs vs using the whole palette. However, when using Skeumorphism you need to find a ...


3

Dropdowns (or spinners) would be a fairly obvious choice. Change corresponding pairs together, so that if you link A to D, D gets linked to A. The implementation problem would then be changing an already-linked D to link to (say) F: you would need to unlink it from A (so you get A↔A) and make a new reciprocal link F↔D. It would be easier to ...


3

The WIMP GUI was disruptive, it made computers accessible to a much greater audience. More recently, rich touch UIs (iPhones) were disruptive, they enabled much greater interactivity with small computers which had a major impact on culture and business. Voice interaction is the next big disruptive UX technology coming up. It will be possibly the only ...


2

I actually think one of the best examples of this isn't a graphical interface at all! I'm thinking of Android Voice Actions and Apple's Siri. They're a complete departure from traditional UIs because they both treat the device as a reactive, almost-conscious entity, rather than an inert machine. Living things are traditionally the only ones with which you ...


2

You have two questions: 1. What kind of design do users like the most at the time of this question, 'Flat' or 'Skeuomorphic'? 2. So my question is, 'should I change it, or keep it the same' To answer Immediate answer is Flat (with caveat). Flat design is in a clear trend. The aesthetic and visual language/vibe of 'flat' is something that most people ...


2

It's a fashion called 'Metro' inspired from Microsoft Metro. Yep, flattened and squared just like a Microsoft-Metro app. If you remember the 'glossy-rounded-gradient' design just came in after windows XP, the 'glossy-rounded-shaded-and-shadowy' came in just after windows Vista. It's a fashion, nothing more.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible