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9

Standard health-and-safety advice is to have your eyeline level with the top of your monitor: So extrapolating that out to TVs - Typical sofa's have seat height lower than office chairs. ~40-45cm (17-18") off the ground. Example (there are loads like this on Google Images): So you need to have the TV lower to accomodate that, especially as they're ...


6

Yes, you should. While there are parts of your scenario that we don't know, there are some generalities than can and should be applied based on known formulas and user expectations. One of those is the thumb minimum size. Take a look at the image below: here you have scrollbars from lots of different systems across decades. However, you'll notice that ...


3

It's best to ask the experts and I can't think of many who would be better than THX. Vertical Placement Make sure each seating position in your home theater has a clear site line to the screen. Try not to place the screen too high on the wall – viewers should not have to look up more than 15°. The idea is to immerse yourself into the ...


2

I imagine it is designed to put the TV at the optimal eye height of the viewers. Ergonomics Data & Mounting Heights article explains that the optimal placement of the screen is having the top of the screen at or slightly below the users eye level. The chart informs us that the average persons sitting eye height is 46.1". Subtract the 33" of that 60" ...


2

It depends. Too many characters in a web page will harm the readability of your text. If your web page is mainly text, will be difficult for your user to read. However there are sites that uses all the space available, allowing a nice reading experience. In some cases, there isn't enough content to fill the sides of the screen so they use blank space at ...


2

You can easily understand why the TV should be low by going to the movie cinema and noticing two things: most of the seats look down on the screen, not up the few seats at the front that look up at the screen fill up last, they are the least-preferred seats. People prefer to look down on a movie screen because it is more comfortable and less tiring ...


1

So, to combat this - should we set a minimum height that a scrollbar thumb can become? Yes, for both reasons you state. The scrollable content could be so large that the thumb shrinks to 0 pixels, thus effectively negating both points: A thumb of size zero can neither be dragged nor seen. The drawback for this is that it then negates the benefit number ...


1

I haven't seen statistics on either fact. What I know as a person who has both tablet sizes and with many friends and colleagues with both (plus smartphones and "phablets") is they it doesn't matter. For a tv show, people will watch it on anything. The bigger screen is better, but there's a cost-benefit analysis that determines if time put into getting that ...


1

Historically they made sense like that. Now we have responsive design. In theory you can have your site cover all screen sizes, however time, scope and analytics may suggest it's not always worth it. Also, information is harder to digest when spread too wide so design and information architecture come into the picture even more.


1

No, you don't need to adjust the height to solve your problem. The height is an indicator for tracking current screen position relative to the full document. Setting a minimum height defeats this purpose. What you should adjust instead is the click area for the thumb control. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups ...



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