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15

There is no golden rule. Marketing wants it twice as large. The UI designer wants it twice as small. So just go somewhere in between.


8

Simply put, mouse pointer size doesn't matter very much besides personal preference. A finger is only as accurate as it is big. A mouse pointer is always accurate to one pixel even if the display icon for it is larger than that. So the issue of size when talking about a mouse isn't nearly as critical as it is for touch.


5

It's for the similar reasons the US still uses inches and feet instead of meters. The US has so much inertia invested in letter page size, switching to something very slightly different has a very poor cost benefit tradeoff. Additionally, being defined in a metric scale, it would be obnoxious to deal with on an imperial basis. So, no, there are no other ...


5

Hard to visualize the problem you have. Not sure there's a golden rule to logo height - but 40 to 70px sounds about right, probably including padding, but it depends on the rest of the content and whether it's wasting space right along the top. Look at this very page for example. [Edit] Added some examples below. If you are forced to have a 15px padding top ...


4

The preview window on my mac is definitely not always the same size (I'm assuming you are talking about the window that pops up when you click on a document and hit the space bar). For example, if I preview a video, it's wide (just like the video), but if I preview a pdf document, it's tall (just like the document itself). If the document is rather small, ...


4

Psychologically speaking, red means caution, stop, or no, and green means good, healthy, or go. See: http://www.psychologicalscience.org/index.php/news/releases/stop-on-red-a-monkey-study-suggests-that-the-effects-of-color-lie-deep-in-evolution.html and: http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/people-places-and-things/201002/positive-design-color


4

The green and red colors are traditionally used in the engineering as "positive, allowed, safe, yes" (green) and "negative, forbidden, danger, no" (red) indication. This tradition is very old and widespread and all people are taught to perceive these colors in this way. So, it would be very unwise to use these colors in other meaning, because this will ...


4

As a general rule, you want to make the interaction area as large as possible to aid with touch interfaces. The counterbalance to this is that you need to make the button area visually cohesive, so it affords the interaction. Given this principle, I would suggest you go for option A in both examples. It is worth noting, however, that A only holds in ...


3

I've always been a fan of this approach. It's easy for the user to see that one decreases, the other increases. They also aren't tasked with choosing from a large variety of font sizes or fiddling with getting a slider exactly where they want it. This is essentially option 3 but with iconography that directly relates to what the user can expect upon taking ...


3

JohnGB is technically correct that in terms of control, the size of the mouse pointer is not as important as for touch. Here are some more points that may be helpful. Control The size of the pointer makes no difference to the pointer's control over one pixel of your screen. Visibility of the Pointer The larger the pointer, the easier it is to find. This ...


3

Because you will be sending these images over the web you should strongly consider storing multiple versions of the image in different sizes (i.e., 32 x 32, 200 x 200, 400 x 400, 800 x 800). This is for several reasons: Disk space is (relatively) cheap You can now serve an optimally sized image for whatever context it is needed in (thumbnail, high def, ...


3

The short answer: as few as possible and still communicating the message in a meaningful way. The long answer: The reason to display a tooltip message varies a lot. But from a User Experience point of view a tooltip can’t be the only way to inform a user. There are users that don’t understand that there is a tooltip to begin with and much less understand ...


2

There are times when you just need to abandon the grid and just focus on the placement of the content so that the logos/images are clearly delineated and a person can quickly differentiate between them as shown in this image below: Alternatively if the logo sizes have huge variations,you can use those variations to create a descending or ascending order ...


2

Definitely A. This style of menu bar is emulating a basic button and a button includes the padding. Also, the bigger the hit area the easier it is for the user.


2

This is the most reasonable formula I've seen for sizing QR codes. It boils down to width = expected distance/scale factor (scale factor should be between 6 (largest) and 10 (smallest)). The following assumes that users are (worst case) 36 inches from the computer screen and that the screens have ~ 100 ppi. For your case this would work out to: width = 36 ...


2

I would suggest that a third option would be better. Have an infinite canvas area (or one that grows as needed), but have a defined page area on the canvas that can be resized in settings. This is the approach that most vector drawing programs (such as Inkscape or Illustrator) use. It has the advantage of allowing a rough work area by simply drawing ...


2

Does it matter if the file will be downloaded vs. shown in browser? A good thing to keep in mind is the performance and user experience of viewing the file in browser vs on computer. Depending on your audience people use different browsers and older browsers which are not good at handling a decent PDF form too. After debating on this, you should decide ...


1

Not sure about how your design looks exactly. But when I got a design idea I believe in, I choose to assume that Apple will too. I try to submit it the way I want it, and worry about the reject when it happens, instead of in advance. There are examples of apps in the App Store that have lists/tables with cells that do not fill the width of screen. For ...


1

There are conceptual problems with option #2 in that this automatic enlargement can be surprising. And what happens if something is moved inward, does the canvas shrink? Does the canvas always shrink to be as small as possible? Can I only resize it by repositioning elements? This elastic magic boundary pattern works for some systems (like the Balsamiq ...


1

Option 2 is probably the way to go. Leave the decision about what size the image can be up to the user, don't assume that you know best in this instance. If they decide that they want to make a massive and illegible image that can't be printed because it's 4 metres wide, then that's up to them really. Ask yourself this question: What would annoy users more ...


1

For the most part, digital wireframes are more useful both for designing and for documentation. However if you need to have them on paper, the chances are that they are needed for archiving or for reviewing. In that case, I would recommend sticking to whatever the standard paper size is wherever you are. That is typically Letter or A4.


1

INSIDE perfect the website layout for a certain width (e.g. 980px, as is recommended for the iPad) stronger layout structure (layout is less likely to break) newspaper-like columns: it is easier for the eye to read in columns with certain number of words than it is to read text running over the whole screen depending on content: typical facebook posts ...


1

It will depend on how much information the QR code has to convey and how far away the scanner is from the image. This page has some calculations based on the number of elements in the QR code, the number of characters and the scan distance. So for a code with 45 "modules", 125 characters being scanned at 300mm you'd need an image that was 27mmx27mm square. ...


1

Stretching or shrinking images can result in unpleasant visual effects. However, it wouldn't be hard to analyze the size of the image, resize it if necessary, and then place it on a black or white background that's always the same size. For example: A transparent logo .png could be centered easily. Users could choose black or white based on their logo ...


1

I'm not sure this is what you are looking for, but it might point you in the right direction. http://uxmag.com/articles/framework-for-designing-for-multiple-devices. It suggests how to create a framework for designing for different screen sizes.


1

Adding 2 more points to sscirrus: Accessability The size of the visible mouse cursor can be changed in current OS, and for a good reason: visually impaired persons will prefer a bigger cursor, even if it hides some of the content behind it. So, if you can, use the size the user specified in his OS preferences. Context The size of the cursor can also vary ...


1

50px does not seem unreasonable at all. Any size that is at least legible but not obtrusive should work.



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