Hot answers tagged

15

There is no golden rule. Marketing wants it twice as large. The UI designer wants it twice as small. So just go somewhere in between.


9

Standard health-and-safety advice is to have your eyeline level with the top of your monitor: So extrapolating that out to TVs - Typical sofa's have seat height lower than office chairs. ~40-45cm (17-18") off the ground. Example (there are loads like this on Google Images): So you need to have the TV lower to accomodate that, especially as they're ...


8

Simply put, mouse pointer size doesn't matter very much besides personal preference. A finger is only as accurate as it is big. A mouse pointer is always accurate to one pixel even if the display icon for it is larger than that. So the issue of size when talking about a mouse isn't nearly as critical as it is for touch.


6

Yes, you should. While there are parts of your scenario that we don't know, there are some generalities than can and should be applied based on known formulas and user expectations. One of those is the thumb minimum size. Take a look at the image below: here you have scrollbars from lots of different systems across decades. However, you'll notice that ...


5

It's for the similar reasons the US still uses inches and feet instead of meters. The US has so much inertia invested in letter page size, switching to something very slightly different has a very poor cost benefit tradeoff. Additionally, being defined in a metric scale, it would be obnoxious to deal with on an imperial basis. So, no, there are no other ...


5

Hard to visualize the problem you have. Not sure there's a golden rule to logo height - but 40 to 70px sounds about right, probably including padding, but it depends on the rest of the content and whether it's wasting space right along the top. Look at this very page for example. [Edit] Added some examples below. If you are forced to have a 15px padding top ...


4

Psychologically speaking, red means caution, stop, or no, and green means good, healthy, or go. See: http://www.psychologicalscience.org/index.php/news/releases/stop-on-red-a-monkey-study-suggests-that-the-effects-of-color-lie-deep-in-evolution.html and: http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/people-places-and-things/201002/positive-design-color


4

The green and red colors are traditionally used in the engineering as "positive, allowed, safe, yes" (green) and "negative, forbidden, danger, no" (red) indication. This tradition is very old and widespread and all people are taught to perceive these colors in this way. So, it would be very unwise to use these colors in other meaning, because this will ...


4

The short answer: as few as possible and still communicating the message in a meaningful way. The long answer: The reason to display a tooltip message varies a lot. But from a User Experience point of view a tooltip can’t be the only way to inform a user. There are users that don’t understand that there is a tooltip to begin with and much less understand ...


4

As a general rule, you want to make the interaction area as large as possible to aid with touch interfaces. The counterbalance to this is that you need to make the button area visually cohesive, so it affords the interaction. Given this principle, I would suggest you go for option A in both examples. It is worth noting, however, that A only holds in ...


4

The preview window on my mac is definitely not always the same size (I'm assuming you are talking about the window that pops up when you click on a document and hit the space bar). For example, if I preview a video, it's wide (just like the video), but if I preview a pdf document, it's tall (just like the document itself). If the document is rather small, ...


3

I've always been a fan of this approach. It's easy for the user to see that one decreases, the other increases. They also aren't tasked with choosing from a large variety of font sizes or fiddling with getting a slider exactly where they want it. This is essentially option 3 but with iconography that directly relates to what the user can expect upon taking ...


3

JohnGB is technically correct that in terms of control, the size of the mouse pointer is not as important as for touch. Here are some more points that may be helpful. Control The size of the pointer makes no difference to the pointer's control over one pixel of your screen. Visibility of the Pointer The larger the pointer, the easier it is to find. This ...


3

First, at least in most used programming languages you have a way to resize the image before or after uploading, so in that case you wouldn't have the need to restrict the image upload to any resolution. If this is not in your plans, you have to decide what will be the purpose of the screenshots on your app and then ask for max resolution you'd for that ...


3

Because you will be sending these images over the web you should strongly consider storing multiple versions of the image in different sizes (i.e., 32 x 32, 200 x 200, 400 x 400, 800 x 800). This is for several reasons: Disk space is (relatively) cheap You can now serve an optimally sized image for whatever context it is needed in (thumbnail, high def, ...


3

It's best to ask the experts and I can't think of many who would be better than THX. Vertical Placement Make sure each seating position in your home theater has a clear site line to the screen. Try not to place the screen too high on the wall – viewers should not have to look up more than 15°. The idea is to immerse yourself into the ...


2

There are times when you just need to abandon the grid and just focus on the placement of the content so that the logos/images are clearly delineated and a person can quickly differentiate between them as shown in this image below: Alternatively if the logo sizes have huge variations,you can use those variations to create a descending or ascending order ...


2

Definitely A. This style of menu bar is emulating a basic button and a button includes the padding. Also, the bigger the hit area the easier it is for the user.


2

This is the most reasonable formula I've seen for sizing QR codes. It boils down to width = expected distance/scale factor (scale factor should be between 6 (largest) and 10 (smallest)). The following assumes that users are (worst case) 36 inches from the computer screen and that the screens have ~ 100 ppi. For your case this would work out to: width = 36 ...


2

I would suggest that a third option would be better. Have an infinite canvas area (or one that grows as needed), but have a defined page area on the canvas that can be resized in settings. This is the approach that most vector drawing programs (such as Inkscape or Illustrator) use. It has the advantage of allowing a rough work area by simply drawing ...


2

Does it matter if the file will be downloaded vs. shown in browser? A good thing to keep in mind is the performance and user experience of viewing the file in browser vs on computer. Depending on your audience people use different browsers and older browsers which are not good at handling a decent PDF form too. After debating on this, you should decide ...


2

It depends. Too many characters in a web page will harm the readability of your text. If your web page is mainly text, will be difficult for your user to read. However there are sites that uses all the space available, allowing a nice reading experience. In some cases, there isn't enough content to fill the sides of the screen so they use blank space at ...


2

I imagine it is designed to put the TV at the optimal eye height of the viewers. Ergonomics Data & Mounting Heights article explains that the optimal placement of the screen is having the top of the screen at or slightly below the users eye level. The chart informs us that the average persons sitting eye height is 46.1". Subtract the 33" of that 60" ...


2

You can easily understand why the TV should be low by going to the movie cinema and noticing two things: most of the seats look down on the screen, not up the few seats at the front that look up at the screen fill up last, they are the least-preferred seats. People prefer to look down on a movie screen because it is more comfortable and less tiring ...


1

Google Chrome's "new tab" page uses relatively small (~140x80) thumbnails. This, coupled with the page's title is clearly enough to quickly identify most sites. Especially so considering these are the pages you visit most often. However, consider this point: In your case, the users will be looking at screenshots from their own websites. Meaning, one ...


1

This is dependent on the type of site you (or your users) have built. If it is mobile, sticking with and iPhone resolution or 640 by 1136 pixels is great for showing a mobile screen shot. For desktop? You should use a grid sized screen shot, which can vary from 960 pixels wide to 1170. The height is up to you. Screen size is not as important as the ...


1

The 150 rule states that the ideal distance for reading text is 150 X the height of the font. So the source content will matter. If the source is not known, I would take best practices for power point font size and use a comfortable tablet viewing distance and base my content window size on this. Ideally the computer video card producing the content ...


1

Not sure about how your design looks exactly. But when I got a design idea I believe in, I choose to assume that Apple will too. I try to submit it the way I want it, and worry about the reject when it happens, instead of in advance. There are examples of apps in the App Store that have lists/tables with cells that do not fill the width of screen. For ...


1

There are conceptual problems with option #2 in that this automatic enlargement can be surprising. And what happens if something is moved inward, does the canvas shrink? Does the canvas always shrink to be as small as possible? Can I only resize it by repositioning elements? This elastic magic boundary pattern works for some systems (like the Balsamiq ...


1

Option 2 is probably the way to go. Leave the decision about what size the image can be up to the user, don't assume that you know best in this instance. If they decide that they want to make a massive and illegible image that can't be printed because it's 4 metres wide, then that's up to them really. Ask yourself this question: What would annoy users more ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible