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0

Main concern would be: If you dont have a drivers license, then you cant sign up? (based on your site this would be a requirement or not) I believe if you really need to do that, put an option so the user can choose that they dont have their driver license with them, so they can fill the form manually. If you cant do this, then count the number of people ...


0

This idea coming down from up top (management) is, if we ask the user their Drivers License # first on our sign up page we can populate the First Name, Last Name, DOB for them, sounds like a good idea right?... If management wants to populate the fields reliably, you could use personal id number for that. Not that people are keen to give it to some ...


2

Aside from the fact that I'd have to pull out my wallet to fill this form, it's just plain scary for me to be asked for a driver's license by a website (aside from car dealers / insurance / road administration sites). I just don't have that much trust in every site I visit. Besides, such forms are spammer's paradise. Generate a random fixed-format string ...


1

If you are including the drivers license for some authorization and if it is so important then i won't suggest to remove it but if it doesn't have massive significance then don't ask for it Just keep the signup form very delight and simple Like just 1. full name 2. email 3. password 4. cell phone number Thats it These are the essential information and ...


0

I completely agree to the other two answers (I upvoted them for that). Don't add more steps to the registration! You're probably asking "When should users invite other people, then?" Since you say this is a newspaper, I think there's a perfect point in time: Together with an article, you present the option to share the article with someone. The user may ...


0

There are three cases User logs in with FB and uses a common e-mail id on FB and your website. You should link these two and you can keep the user informed about this update. The user has already provided access to Facebook profile and I am sure no one would mind clubbing these two. User logs in with FB and uses different e-mail IDs for FB and your ...


0

It depend to the website. What it talking about? In general, registration should be more short possible. have you tried to change the patterns of presentation and compare the datas? You're asking a lot of information in a single moment, many of these personal, you might be discouraged to continue. A sign-in by step may entice the user to continue. One ...


0

Depends whats the form all about. Whats the website all about. Is it a government website, or a banking site or a commercial website. Users will behave differently. The motivation and seriousness are different for all the types of websites listed above. Hence the success for completion of forms. The success of registration forms depends on what lies on ...


2

Absolutely Not Login attempts lock after a few attempts (or they better, otherwise an attacker could break in trying the top 100 likely passwords), at least for a few minutes. Users would be very confused, I think, if registration screens locked after a few attempts, and by not logging them in, you give the attacker a clue that they password was wrong, so ...


0

Yes and no. You should let the user know that the email already has an account associated with. They should then be able to switch to login without retyping anything. The God Login Shows this well, Using just email and password fields while having multiple buttons for the different actions. Hiding the signup button on the login page, is also acceptable as ...


1

No, because you just doubled the attack surface. Request the user enter an identifier. Atomically check if the identifier already has credentials. If so, offer three choices: Go to login form Go to forgotten credentials form Resubmit a new identifier Same effect as you proposed, but the login barrier remains in exactly one place. Being in one place, ...


39

Yes, log the user in There are several ways an existing user might end up on a sign-up page: User clicks sign up by mistake User recently signed up for an account and the browser URL autocomplete takes user back to that URL (most recent) User forgot they signed up previously and is attempting to sign up again (and, like many users, ill-advisedly uses the ...


2

I would say no, do not login eventhough all the credentials are identical. Eventhough it would seem logical to login because all the credentials are identical, it will as mentioned above cause confusion. I would just say give them a notification about the username/email is already in use. If you want to login the user, I'd say work with cookies?


28

I disagree with the other answers, and say yes, it may make sense (with a couple of caveats). There is an increasing prevalence of the combined login/sign up form pattern on some sites, where the whole sign up form is simply email address and password, and all more substantive profile questions become an optional step after registration. This pattern ...


33

NO. There are chances that user might have no idea about their registration status on the site. And start a fresh registration. In such a case, best solution would be to OFFER a way to login by inline validation. Before the user reaches the password field, the validation should suggest ways to login as the email is present in database. But, since its not ...


51

So basically you want someone who signs up for a new account and enters already existing credentials, to log in as the owner of these credentials? I wouldn't recommend this: The chance that the person signing up is not the owner of the existing account may be small, it is still possible. The difference between signing up and logging in should be clear. A ...


5

I would not recommend that. Signing up screen should inform visitor that a certain email is already registered. When you inform the user about that, he/she takes a step back to remember when and what he/she did that. This helps him/her get into context about the last visit to this site. Your website should comply to user's mental model. I do not think every ...


1

No. Irrespective of the fact that you may want to use something other than the e-mail address to uniquely identify a user (such as a separate user ID), no 2 different users can have the same e-mail address. Period. If a user registers with an e-mail address that is already known by you, you may want to direct him/her to the "forgot password" ...



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