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41

Overall, I think taking users where they came from can be better. Usually, users register to continue their path to a certain goal. For example, Kate was reading comments to a news article, she thought that she has something good to say and clicked "Comment" (Kate's goal is to comment). Now the system asks Kate to register and takes Kate straight to the ...


40

All of them except "e-mail" and "Password". This is the minimum information you need to uniquely identify a user and allow them secure access to your site. The only other piece of vital information would be their address if you were shipping them something - but you can ask for that when they actually order something and not before. All of the other ones ...


22

Let's say the user just cannot receive email on their mobile device - for example those that deliberately do not want to be contacted by email - those on a limited data plan - or those without the inclination or technical know-how to setup email. For whatever reason, there are going to be people who fit that category. So ask yourself if you want to ...


22

Email might be longer to type but it has other benefits: It is much easier for me to remember when I go to log back into the site I am very unlikely to run into the problem that the username I want is already taken (it is frustrating to have to do several tries at signing up to a service because of this).


20

Users come to your site to complete a task. You should make this as easy for them as possible. Registration may be a necessary step from your perspective, but for users it is an annoyance and an additional step they have to take in order to complete their task. If you then direct them to a welcome page that makes them lose their context and adds little ...


14

Amazon does this quite nicely. That’s the only place I’ve seen it done.


12

First, keep a non-exiperable cookie with email so you could always identify if it is a returning user, even if his login session has expired and he has no autofill on. Second, when user completes email field, send an ajax request to determine if such a user exist or not. Depending on that, choose tab. Fields are the same, so do not clear them when ...


12

While looking at a selection of more than 100 high profile sign up forms, I found that just 7% showed their sign-up form in a modal dialog, and I believe there is a good reason for this. Consider this - where (if at all) do you send the user after they have signed up or logged in? If you popup a modal dialog, the user generally expects the dialog to ...


9

Because there is nothing telling you that you will get to see the link if you fail to log in. It breaks down to these cases: You know you have an account --> normal procedure. You think you have an account but you don't --> Failed login. You know you do not have an account --> you will look for a way to get one. If it is not there, why would you try to ...


8

There are usually two scenarios of registration. Registration as direct action (user wants to sign in to use service) or registration as required action (user wants to add comment as in Anna's post). For the second case of indirect registration it is better to return user to the context, where he've met the requirement to be registered to do certain ...


8

It is legal to do that, but you will gain no legal protection if the default state is to agree. Unless a user explicitly agrees (which means actively doing something rather than not doing something), any legal agreement that you have will be unenforceable in court. This has been tried and tested legally, so it is one of the few areas that are crystal ...


7

37Signals did an amazing job with Highrise. They've been testing the signup page using different designs and sharing the results. http://37signals.com/svn/posts/1525-writing-decisions-headline-tests-on-the-highrise-signup-page http://37signals.com/svn/posts/2977-behind-the-scenes-highrise-marketing-site-ab-testing-part-1 ...


7

(Not really a UX question, imo.) But here's what Bruce Schneier has to say about secret questions (which are bad for the same reasons hints are bad). Nuff said.


7

Looks like you are getting new people to register with you for the first time. It also would be safe to assume you have not, at this point, sold them anything. Therefore the only pieces of information you need to gather are their email address, that's it. Optionally their name so you can personalise emails, but all the rest is, at this stage, irrelevant. ...


7

You should offer both. When presented with the option of using an existing major account or creating a new account specific to the system, many people will opt to create a new account. There are pros and cons to each, but there is no reason not to offer them both. This is what StackExchange does.


6

I wrote about this a while back: Fixing Registration & Login Forms – Passwords Look at what Twitter does - they just ask you to choose a password, nothing more. For mobile, I would say that the concerns that masking attempts to address are even less important. How likely is it that someone will be watching you type your password when using your mobile ...


6

What I have seen as a good practice is entering the password only once, but displaying it is text rather than masking it. This way you can see exactly what your entered and will not have to worry about errors. I don't think captcha is necessary here, not positive on that though. It would be one extra and potentially annoying step for mobile use though. ...


6

There is no good reason to use this for a service where you know a persons email address. Sometimes it is used in case someone looses access to their email address (changes jobs etc.), but even then I would question the choice. Many programs require complicated to remember passwords under the misconception that they are more secure (like 3xzA@|\e), so ...


6

A placeholder is an efficient tool for teaching what your user is going to do next without spoon-feeding him. The key of success here is to give an answer to the question: What am I gonna to do next, how and why? As this could be a lot of information, it's okay to split the answer on multiple dialogs. An example: If you want to get the user's profile image, ...


6

The potential issue that comes immediately to mind is delay. Yes, as Evil Closet Monkey says in the comment here, and many others have said across many questions, forgetting a password is very common, and thus people are familiar with password reset functionality. But if I have to do that every time I login, I have to wait for the email to arrive before I ...


6

We used social plugin for couple of our products for login. To answer your first question, the simple advantage is that the user need not enter his credentials every time he/she signs in to your app. Most of the times the user is already logged into FB / google etc and can use the same to sign into your app too. A large percentage of users turn away when ...


5

Take a look at Stack Overflow Careers. The main page clearly indicates it's for job seekers and there is a fairly prominent "for employers" link which takes you to the employers page. This is clear who the target audience is and again has a link back to the job seekers page. So - who are going to be the majority of your users? If there is a clear ...


5

I am working on an project right now in our company where we're facing just the same issue where we need a different approach. ATM the sign-on process is the known one: register check mail click to confirm, set password and enjoy (the SaaS logs you in automatically after you entered your password -- I've seen "flows" doing it worse by letting you ...


5

It all depends on the service that you provide, but the best way is to allow the user to input as less information as possible, then more users would register. Amazon does it quite well, email and password. The rest of information is provided only when the user decided to buy the product.


5

I can understand that sometimes people from particular departments ask for additional data for the new signups. This is usually the case for B2B services in which marketing and sales people directly contact every new customer, so they need the data to weight leads and to call potential customers. The easy approach is to have a long signup form. The more ...


5

In response to a question Do "confirm Email" Boxes In Sign-up Forms Work? on a marketing resources website, Steve Alker at UniMax Solutions writes as follows (my emboldening): I’ve never come across any published data to say that it actually improves the ratio of people who fill in a form in over the percentage of people who decide to move on without ...


5

Don't make people think before they have made a commitment to sign up (by selecting a sign up button). Every time you make a potential customer think you create an opportunity for then to choose not to and leave your site. It's also much harder to later optimise your page when you have two sign up buttons, as suddenly there are more variables to consider. ...


5

First let the vendor create a basic profile by registering their Shop name, email id, and contact info. Then when they signup you can show a bar on the dashboard like LinkedIn's or some sort of ticker saying "Please complete you profile for best experience" similar to the one shown in image below. This helps us in notifying the vendor in a very polite ...


5

In this instance I think the number of characters to type is a trivial issue, not least of which because users will likely have typed their email addresses countless times before so it will roll off their fingertips, also, if you correctly define the input element, browsers can assist with autofill. This leaves the advantages: Guaranteed uniqueness (on ...


4

There's a few good resources on password usability. Sitepoint has a great list of points when considering a password system, most importantly: It can often seem like a good idea to allow users to include a hint to help them recall their password. However, this can be a little bit dangerous: users might simply enter their password (or a derivative of ...



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