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51

So basically you want someone who signs up for a new account and enters already existing credentials, to log in as the owner of these credentials? I wouldn't recommend this: The chance that the person signing up is not the owner of the existing account may be small, it is still possible. The difference between signing up and logging in should be clear. A ...


41

Yes, log the user in There are several ways an existing user might end up on a sign-up page: User clicks sign up by mistake User recently signed up for an account and the browser URL autocomplete takes user back to that URL (most recent) User forgot they signed up previously and is attempting to sign up again (and, like many users, ill-advisedly uses the ...


40

All of them except "e-mail" and "Password". This is the minimum information you need to uniquely identify a user and allow them secure access to your site. The only other piece of vital information would be their address if you were shipping them something - but you can ask for that when they actually order something and not before. All of the other ones ...


36

If you are providing a valuable service/product there will always be people trying to "cheat" the system and get in. Providing a free trial period is an industry norm and over time users may sign up for more than one trial but that will get old fast. I would worry less about ensuring authentic users and focus more on providing that great content. If you're ...


34

NO. There are chances that user might have no idea about their registration status on the site. And start a fresh registration. In such a case, best solution would be to OFFER a way to login by inline validation. Before the user reaches the password field, the validation should suggest ways to login as the email is present in database. But, since its not ...


29

I disagree with the other answers, and say yes, it may make sense (with a couple of caveats). There is an increasing prevalence of the combined login/sign up form pattern on some sites, where the whole sign up form is simply email address and password, and all more substantive profile questions become an optional step after registration. This pattern ...


24

Let's say the user just cannot receive email on their mobile device - for example those that deliberately do not want to be contacted by email - those on a limited data plan - or those without the inclination or technical know-how to setup email. For whatever reason, there are going to be people who fit that category. So ask yourself if you want to ...


23

Email might be longer to type but it has other benefits: It is much easier for me to remember when I go to log back into the site I am very unlikely to run into the problem that the username I want is already taken (it is frustrating to have to do several tries at signing up to a service because of this).


14

Amazon does this quite nicely. That’s the only place I’ve seen it done.


13

First, keep a non-exiperable cookie with email so you could always identify if it is a returning user, even if his login session has expired and he has no autofill on. Second, when user completes email field, send an ajax request to determine if such a user exist or not. Depending on that, choose tab. Fields are the same, so do not clear them when ...


13

While looking at a selection of more than 100 high profile sign up forms, I found that just 7% showed their sign-up form in a modal dialog, and I believe there is a good reason for this. Consider this - where (if at all) do you send the user after they have signed up or logged in? If you popup a modal dialog, the user generally expects the dialog to ...


13

This is a tough issue that I'm not sure anyone has really solved yet, but here are my thoughts for your 3 solutions. Phone number Yes this might be a bit personal or creepy but I feel like it's becoming less so since people are actually using their phones less and less. You'll want to be clear that you're not selling their phone number to a marketing ...


12

Consider using federated user authentication from some social network like Facebook or Twitter. You can suggest to your user that your use of social credentials is a service to them, saving them the hassle of remembering and maintaining a different username/password set for your site. Should they change their password on the social network, your site would ...


12

The negative aspect is that you've inadvertently complicated the process. If I signed up and used my preferred secure password then I'm in and done. However with the auto gen password approach I have to get the email, click the link, go back to the email, copy the password "G34-zaopwf792hj" (cause I'm not going to attempt to re-type it) paste it in, then ...


9

It is legal to do that, but you will gain no legal protection if the default state is to agree. Unless a user explicitly agrees (which means actively doing something rather than not doing something), any legal agreement that you have will be unenforceable in court. This has been tried and tested legally, so it is one of the few areas that are crystal ...


9

Because there is nothing telling you that you will get to see the link if you fail to log in. It breaks down to these cases: You know you have an account --> normal procedure. You think you have an account but you don't --> Failed login. You know you do not have an account --> you will look for a way to get one. If it is not there, why would you try to ...


8

Honestly, a valuable product. You are not the first one to offer trials. You would scare more potential customers off than you would save through fraud-detection processes. If your customers like what you do, they will pay for it. If they use your software on a regular basis and still create a new account each time, they can't or don't want to afford it. ...


8

No, you should not use CAPTCHA. You should focus on technical ways of solving your problems rather than shifting the technical burden onto your users. As a simple example, you are asking for an email address, so you could validate the email address (which you should do anyway) as a substitute for CAPTCHA. Someone could still write a script to generate ...


7

37Signals did an amazing job with Highrise. They've been testing the signup page using different designs and sharing the results. http://37signals.com/svn/posts/1525-writing-decisions-headline-tests-on-the-highrise-signup-page http://37signals.com/svn/posts/2977-behind-the-scenes-highrise-marketing-site-ab-testing-part-1 ...


7

(Not really a UX question, imo.) But here's what Bruce Schneier has to say about secret questions (which are bad for the same reasons hints are bad). Nuff said.


7

There is no good reason to use this for a service where you know a persons email address. Sometimes it is used in case someone looses access to their email address (changes jobs etc.), but even then I would question the choice. Many programs require complicated to remember passwords under the misconception that they are more secure (like 3xzA@|\e), so ...


7

Looks like you are getting new people to register with you for the first time. It also would be safe to assume you have not, at this point, sold them anything. Therefore the only pieces of information you need to gather are their email address, that's it. Optionally their name so you can personalise emails, but all the rest is, at this stage, irrelevant. ...


7

You should offer both. When presented with the option of using an existing major account or creating a new account specific to the system, many people will opt to create a new account. There are pros and cons to each, but there is no reason not to offer them both. This is what StackExchange does.


6

What I have seen as a good practice is entering the password only once, but displaying it is text rather than masking it. This way you can see exactly what your entered and will not have to worry about errors. I don't think captcha is necessary here, not positive on that though. It would be one extra and potentially annoying step for mobile use though. ...


6

I wrote about this a while back: Fixing Registration & Login Forms – Passwords Look at what Twitter does - they just ask you to choose a password, nothing more. For mobile, I would say that the concerns that masking attempts to address are even less important. How likely is it that someone will be watching you type your password when using your mobile ...


6

Take a look at Stack Overflow Careers. The main page clearly indicates it's for job seekers and there is a fairly prominent "for employers" link which takes you to the employers page. This is clear who the target audience is and again has a link back to the job seekers page. So - who are going to be the majority of your users? If there is a clear ...


6

A placeholder is an efficient tool for teaching what your user is going to do next without spoon-feeding him. The key of success here is to give an answer to the question: What am I gonna to do next, how and why? As this could be a lot of information, it's okay to split the answer on multiple dialogs. An example: If you want to get the user's profile image, ...


6

I agree with Igor-G that one conversion type (getting a new signup) is more valuable than the other (an existing user logging back in), but I think the primary reason is slightly more complex, and would still make sense even if the two we're of equal value to the company. It's a function of how much each user-type's conversion likelihood can be influenced ...


6

In this instance I think the number of characters to type is a trivial issue, not least of which because users will likely have typed their email addresses countless times before so it will roll off their fingertips, also, if you correctly define the input element, browsers can assist with autofill. This leaves the advantages: Guaranteed uniqueness (on ...


6

The potential issue that comes immediately to mind is delay. Yes, as Evil Closet Monkey says in the comment here, and many others have said across many questions, forgetting a password is very common, and thus people are familiar with password reset functionality. But if I have to do that every time I login, I have to wait for the email to arrive before I ...



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