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The content type will determine the best way. You say you're building the site for a nonprofit (I actually help NPOs for work!), and that the content is mostly articles. The most common way is to segregate the data into dates (article type as parent, month as child) and show only the last few months with a final "older" option. This also means having a ...


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Don't waste space or create confusion When you duplicate information, you make the user look at it twice. This creates some disorientation. You can treat the top categories like tabs then expose their sub-categories at the top portion of your left nav. This has the benefit of encouraging subcategory discovery and providing a sense of place within the ...


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You could try using an accordion instead of tabs (here are some pros and cons), but it won't always work. Can't say that I see a good way of integrating tabs into the sidebar. As you mentioned,it doesn't look very good, and for a good reason - if all your objects have the exact same structure, it doesn't make a lot of sense to repeat it for each leaf in the ...


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I have never seen in any web site some one use two hamburger icons. please find the following sample. it is BBC homepage which has a drop down menu and humbugger icon for different section , you could use the drop down menu instead of top menu and for your sidebar menu you could use the hamburger!


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Using the hamburger icon for lower navigation components it's not a good idea since most people already associate it with high level navigation. You could try using a different icon for the lower level navigation components like Wikipedia does: Closed Open Additional suggestion : Placing a "Menu" label next to the hamburger icon improves its recognition ...


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This is a tricky one - I really dislike stacked hamburger menus. Also - Note: Colleges are not always known for having the best UX so be careful at looking at them for examples(always relevant XKCD comic: https://xkcd.com/773/.) First, do you have access to your site's analytics? Are you able to change nav priorities and redo the information architecture? ...


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This is actually something I did on a recent website I designed. It's not a sidebar menu on desktop, rather a secondary menu (that doesn't show up in the main nav, only in the concerned pages, just like University of Chicago in your example.) but I think the challenge on mobile is the same. As you said, there is a usability challenge in stacking up ...



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