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13

Anything placed on the left of your screen will be looked at first by most people (reading left to right). If your navigation is very important to you, then put it on the left. Historically this is also where most people expect to see navigation, so if they are looking for it, they will find it here faster. If however you would like to emphasise your ...


12

For me, although I don't always like it, I think having the navigation that's important, on the left because this is where people look first. This might be the main menu or some kind of sub menu to navigate between sections of the website. On the right you can include another column of "menu" type stuff, like additional information or links to other related ...


11

Putting navigation on the left is very orthodox and through repetition it has become enshrined in the cannon of UI dogma. However that doesn't necessarily make it true. Jared Spool wrote on this subject: In my opinion, you shouldn’t care what I (or potentially most others on this list) like for navigation. I don’t even think you should care what your ...


9

Not only are the majority of users "left to right" language users, the majority of those are right handed, using their mouse with their right hand. I believe that from the neutral position of 'mouse hand straight ahead', greater angular movement is available to the left than to the right. Therefor the left margin is a better Fitts's target for most users. ...


9

People tend to read more to the left and click more to the right. The left sidebar is better suited for navigation, the right sidebar is better suited for advertising & other widgets.


7

I never use the tags cloud. Vote up if you do not use them as well ;-)


7

I'd say go with the second example (arrow placement to the left of the text). Why's that? Well, take a look at for instance the Explorer of Windows and you'll notice the arrows being placed to the left, or e.g. in the Component inspector of Google Chrome. In other words, this is most likely where users expect the arrows to be placed (based on previous ...


6

If your intention is to reduce the reduced sidepanel real estate to zero, there's really very few options available in terms of design patterns. The question simply becomes 'where do you put the button' For example, The Opera Desktop Browser has a button at the bottom left, in the status bar which toggles the visibility of the panel: Other positions ...


5

It can be, if you answer yes to anyone of these questions: Has your sidebar remained the exact same for the last 3 months? Does your sidebar exhibit signs of “sidebar creep” ? Was there a time when people clicked around in your sidebar, but now you’re thinking you might have dreamed it? Do you have more than 4 affiliate buttons showing at one ...


4

I agree with @John here..traditionally all the heatmaps talk about an F-shape while navigating or reading through a lot of content. So if you look at some of the really content heavy apps they always put the navigation on the left..(gives you a way to quickly view what all there is to the website) I would recommend you check out Google Reader - which is an ...


4

Sidebars are great! you just have to use the right widgets. I use sidebars for sub navigation, or to promote certain pages on a site, or to promote an activity (like register here, or buy now). Many people use ready made templates and don't know how to setup the sidebar widgets, but those who do get a lot of use out of them.


4

Maybe it's just me, but I like when a blog has a tag cloud. It lets me see at a glance what kinds of things the author talks about, and gives me a really easy way to browse the content that I'm interested in. I also like the archive links, if I've just discovered a blog that's been around for a while and I want to go back to the beginning and get caught up. ...


4

Be careful about what you put in the sidebar. Most often people just throw stuff in there that they are used to seeing. Drop the archive links (who browses by date?), especially if it's a calendar, drop the tag cloud, etc. Put things that people are likely to click on, a list of recent posts, if they liked your post, they will probably want more like it (a ...


4

There are different design patterns depending on what kind of content we are talking about. Looking at the article Placing Sidebars: Do You Lean to the Right or the Left? one can read the following: To most people, where the sidebar navigation is on a website seem like something pretty insignificant. Chances are if you’re an average website user, ...


4

Complexity is a relative term. It depends on the context of the user and the tasks they are trying to complete using your interface. For example, the instrument panel of a Cessna 182 will look very complex to a non-pilot: Similarly, the instrument panel of a Boeing 787 will look very complex to a private pilot that has only ever flown a 182: The ...


4

Sidebars are considered "reserved spaces" for good reason. If you want a user to find a button / menu item quickly then the best place to put it is on one of the edges (this can be top, bottom, left, or right). This is because targets that are easiest to reach quickly with a mouse are the corners and edges of a screen / window. If you don't have enough ...


3

I've seen many places where you roll over one menu option, and it expands to reveal a sub menu. If this is the case, it makes sense that it should expand to the right, to be more natural to the reader (assuming they read left-to-right). If it needs to expand to the right, then it's best to anchor it to the left of the page. If your readers read ...


3

In left-to-right languages, you want the most important elements on the left. If this includes your navigation elements, that is where they should go. Reversed for right-to-left languages, of course.


3

That depends on how much you want to emphasise it. A background colour is definitely more noticeable than a coloured link, but it is also more distracting. You need to decide what the best balance is for your application as one is not always better than the other.


3

2nd one is better, fast glance and the user will know where they are and how deep they are on the website. take a look at what Google is saying about this kind of navigation. I wouldn't make the text much smaller, because that would make it hard to read. but indenting sub categories is a common practice. Think about Windows Explorer view download ...


3

One of the benefits to the first option however is it leaves you more room for variable length link text. Depending on your use case the benefit of having indentation might be mitigated by the negative effect of wrapping text: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups I think option 1 could be effective if you use ...


3

If you happen to be filling the form below the scroll fold and add a top section you'll not only have the same problem of not seeing the section appear right in front of you but also experience your current view being pushed down by the new content which very is annoying. I'd suggest going with an accordion of collapsible sections like below: ...


3

He's correct. The reason is that typical western style of reading is from Left to Right. You can see point #2 at: http://sixrevisions.com/usabilityaccessibility/10-usability-tips-based-on-research-studies/ There are also a great number of additional points you might want to look at while there.


3

The first screenshot shows navigational items, and is placed to the left because of English reading order, left-to-right (LTR). This means that items to the left are higher up in the hierarchy than items to the right. Works perfectly. The second sceenshot shows option menu (not for navigation) to the right of the main item. These options are attributes of ...


3

I would simply make sure that each menu item was correctly padded/margined. If so, you'd get something more along the lines of this:


2

It depends on what you want your users to see first. People are used to left side menus for navigation inside the content sections. If the menus are not related to the content then right-top would be a better position.


2

I used to be of the opinion that the menu should go on the left, until I read a piece that changed my mind. (May have been from http://www.alistapart.com/ but I can't find it with a quick search.) The piece suggested that when people are reading a block of writing on your site, their eyes need to easily be able to find the start of the next line of text. ...


2

+1 to the points about making it context sensitive. +1 to the idea that tag clouds are a bad idea - they just aren't very meaningful. A further point is to avoid using graphical banners, as many users confuse these with ads and will reflexively avoid them.


2

Are we talking about mobile specifically? Than the best answer is a dedicated layout. If it is about desktop browsers than my research indicates that usually right menu helps in giving more relevance to the content (that's why works better for blogs) and left menu works better for apps or shops as gives more emphasis to the navigation itself. But you ...



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