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1

I would remove the incrementing controls from the quantity inputs. The number HTML input type supports this by default, so it's probably unnecessary. Having users use the mouse to increment or decrement something is going to very slow. Ideally, you'd have the ability to exclusively use your keyboard for this whole process (tabbing left/right, ...


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i found that. According to this article there should be always full screen cart even if you use "quick cart".


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I spent a lot of time on cart abandonment in a large ecomm setting. I can tell you what we found and what I've experienced in the wild while investigating. Don't re/pre-populate the cart.* I've heard of this idea, but never seen it used in any real world setting. There are too many complications from a UX perspective. Ultimately, those problems will result ...


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Having the number of items in a cart is good practice. From a design perspective, the number of items provides: A form of feedback to confirm to users that item(s) have been added to the cart. A visual indicator of what is in the cart. Don't underestimate this because "it's just a number". It's well studied that even basic indicators can help users feel ...


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Based purely on your question, why is it difficult for you to show two items and in brackets show the number of pieces per item? If nothing else, there are two reasons that the user might want to see this (not saying that they will, but it is not good to make design assumptions/decisions without checking with users these days): To make sure that they have ...


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There aren't any studies on 'quick' carts that I can find, however, it is well documented that speed is essential for website users. Load times are a good example here. A lot of users will abandon sites if they take too long to load. (https://blog.kissmetrics.com/loading-time/) With this in mind, one could assume that a quick, load in-place cart that allows ...



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