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We've done copius amounts of testing across various sites and markets and in all cases red buttons out perform other colours. My thinking is that, although we are inherently programed to react to red, our reactions work to draw our attention. The conversion is then far easier to achieve.


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Colour psychology and marketing is a specialist subject. If your designer has a good understanding of this subject, challenging them over the colour they've chosen is probably not the smartest approach. However, I'm not certain they have, given the context. The choice is certainly not the one I'd make in this situation. In European & North American ...


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It's not, unless red is already used as a confirmation/submit action consistently throughout your site and in this workflow. Google, to talk about the example Henrik Ekblom uses, has red like this because it's used consistently throughout the UI. It's a part of their overall user interface patterns on products like Gmail. This is a case where red would be ...


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First of all, that 'article' that you were sent supporting the notion that red is good is ridiculous. It is not even an article, it is some lady opining about her child's behavior. It's stupid and doesn't mean anything. Moreover, the invocation of evolutionary biology is silly and incoherent. Who's blood are we seeing here? Maybe red is such a striking ...


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I feel like the issue is not so much "is a red button ok", but that in that image you specifically have a white button, a light blue button, and a bright red button. Red by itself could mean a lot of different things, but the contrast between the two calm looking buttons and the red one seems to imply something special about the red one. A red button is ...


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It depends entirely on the page, site, situation. What works for company A may not work for company B. My suggestion is to use A/B testers, like Google's Experiments https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/1745147?hl=en With A/B testing, you can measure your visitors reactions to different versions of your page (you can change elements in the page, ...


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Check out Google Drive - they use red buttons. I don't think that red signals error as long as the theme and GUI parts of the page goes in red (and that is probably why Google uses those colors). If there would have been a red and a green button, then I would have been suspicious about clicking the red, but in this case I don't get that feeling. The ...


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We are testing the exact same thing at the moment (hopefully I'll get back with the result when it'ts done). From our current experience and I've seen this on other sites, people tend do click the red button IF there is no other "actions". You have 3 buttons very close to each other and personally I would not click the red button. If it was Green I ...


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Since you have phrased your question 'Is it acceptable...', the answer is: Yes it is acceptable. A lot of things are sub-optimal and still acceptable. Depends on your standards :) Is it the best possible choice of colors for this particular action? No, very likely not! It does one thing and only one thing very good - stand out, however it also introduces a ...


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On web you need user's focus as much as possible and this can be achieved via images/color and typography etc. Red is associated with eagerness, energy and attention. So when we see red(traffic light, blood, danger signs, waitress with red lipstick , red apple) we stop. And then take an action. So as per your screen you want user to validate before he hit ...


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Color associations are very cultural thing. In computer culture I assume people usually don't think: oh blood, yammi. At least my experience is that red implies mostly one of the following: Attention: whatever it is, it must be important Error: As developers always wanted attention for errors, in the right context red is highly associated with errors. Just ...



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