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It's good you're doing research on the side and considering the findings of previous studies. The two images are significantly different, so I'm guessing... the screens that lead up to them also vary? When you change something about one screen the preceeding and subsequent screens will change, too. It's about the part of the user flow. So, to give you ...


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I think no matter where you place the coupon box, you're going to have some level of checkout abandonment by users looking for codes. Option 1: Adjust the terminology You could consider changing the term from Coupon (which sounds like something you can quickly Google to obtain) to Gift Code, Gift Card, or maybe even Promotional Code, which I think all ...


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I would stick with putting the coupon code as it is in image 1. This allows the user to add or remove items from the shopping cart while seeing their total after the discounts. Users will want to see their final total/subtotal before clicking checkout, so that they are certain the coupon has had its effect. If they see the total after the coupon, they may be ...


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I think the best design solution to this is thinking of the use cases. A typical 'shopping cart' involves 'one order' with everything centering around the one order. In your use case, it doesn't make sense to have one overall shopping cart, so you need to group things in some manner. It sounds like the best way to group things would be based on location ...


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If I have to look up at the shopping cart icon to know that I'm in the shopping cart, that's the design problem. A user's attention is on the contents of the page. The contents of that page should make it clear where the user is and, in the case of a shopping cart, where the user goes next. It is of absolutely no cognitive benefit to the user to highlight a ...



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