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26

Since you have phrased your question 'Is it acceptable...', the answer is: Yes it is acceptable. A lot of things are sub-optimal and still acceptable. Depends on your standards :) Is it the best possible choice of colors for this particular action? No, very likely not! It does one thing and only one thing very good - stand out, however it also introduces a ...


19

Well it's not a completely unused pattern: I see this pattern mostly used where the purchase button is the only step in the process (that or purchase button + sign in/password). This is how Google Play, iTunes/the App Store and Amazon's App store all work. Note the following about all of these stores: There's no cart. There's one step and (usually) no ...


18

Check out Google Drive - they use red buttons. I don't think that red signals error as long as the theme and GUI parts of the page goes in red (and that is probably why Google uses those colors). If there would have been a red and a green button, then I would have been suspicious about clicking the red, but in this case I don't get that feeling. The ...


17

It's explained in Amazon's website, in this page Why don't we show the price?: Retailers like Amazon have the legal right to set their own prices independently, but some manufacturers place restrictions on how those prices may be communicated. Because our price on this item is lower than the manufacturer's "minimum advertised price," the ...


16

The term Add to Cart indicates that you might be adding the item into the basket of items you are intending to buy but you want to continue shopping, so it's very common to hit an Add to Cart button and for nothing much to happen other than a simple in-page confirmation and a 'number of items in basket' indicator to increment in the corner of the page. The ...


16

I can see no real functional reason to clear a basket automatically. Basket should have a function to clear old(er) items. A "select all" on the list of items in the basket and "remove from basket" action would suffice for that. Other than that there should be warnings on price changes as Amazon does. And of course there should be a warning when an item in ...


14

This is tricky, because you have a variety of different scenarios for when automatically clearing items is a great idea and probably just as many for when it’s not. Personally I agree that it shouldn’t be cleared. I’ve been surprised when visiting the same site again to find items in my cart that I didn’t remove by myself. But that’s just me — and the ...


12

Instead of saying one colour is better than another for your "add to cart" button, I suggest you carry out a multivariate test with different colour and text combinations. You'll soon discover which colour results in the most conversions. (This all assumes your website has enough traffic to conduct the tests in a sensible length of time).


12

You are asking the wrong question. The point of showing the number of items in the cart is to show the 'Status' of the cart. It works as a really good signifier to the user that he has added X number of items in the cart. Scenarios to think when you do not show number of items: You add an item to the cart, but, actually the click didn't register and you ...


9

Not really, I think. The main irritating thing is that you can't drag an item from the front page (the link you gave). If you try to drag the image or the name of the set there, it doesn't work. And, that is a bit strange as the shopping cart is visible, and explaining you to drag items into it. It remains unclear what 'an item' is. You have to get to the ...


9

I'm not sure I know of the best UI's but I know the ones that frustrate the heck out of me ;-) Logic would suggest that the opposite features are the ones that make it better. I hate not being able to see my total. As soon as I am "in" my cart, I always want to be able to see my total price. I live in Canada - depending on the site/product, Shipping ...


9

Color associations are very cultural thing. In computer culture I assume people usually don't think: oh blood, yammi. At least my experience is that red implies mostly one of the following: Attention: whatever it is, it must be important Error: As developers always wanted attention for errors, in the right context red is highly associated with errors. Just ...


8

Most of the answers here imply that color is a carrier of meaning and mood. It is not. Moods and meanings are invoked in the brain, not by the color but by the environment in which -admittingly- colors play a crucial role. But then it's not about the color, but rather about the colors (plural). More in particular: it is about the relationship between the ...


7

I would combine the waiting list and a fix time slot and get the benefits of both. Waiting lists aren't just helpful when tickets are getting short. You can use them even if your course is sold out for days to resale returning tickets. A fix time slot sets the user a bit under pressure (in a good way) and, different from a refreshing session timeout, ...


7

Firstly don't rely on colour only, a surprisingly large number of people have difficulty interpreting colours. Position would be a better way of differentiating, or using contrast or borders. As far as the wording goes: ask yourself this question: when a person is in the supermarket, do they delete or clear an item from their trolley ? If you asked 100 ...


6

A while ago I wrote an article titled "Call to Action Buttons and the psychology of colors" where I explained that every color evokes a different feeling or mood with people and therefore result in a different reaction when seeing the color. There is also a bit of color theory involved. It all comes down that there is a best-performing color to use in CTA's ...


6

I think you're taking the right steps, but with the wrong premise. I believe (with no evidence other than having discussed with friends and from personal beliefs) that shopping cart abandonment comes to two factors: 1) Being curious about how much the final cost of an order will be (after shipping and taxes), but realizing there's "too much work involved ...


5

Despite the technical reasons listed in other answers, there is no good reason not to do this. Pitch it to some company; or don't, and by mentioning it here, you'll probably see it appear in e-commerce sites soon enough. It makes the linkages between the UI and the backend more complex--but not ridiculously so. Amazon has already introduced the "switch ...


5

I'd agree with #1. Adding/checking/modifying the items in my shopping cart feels like a separate process than checking out (which signifies that I'm done). Personally, I'd feel a bit preempted if just checking my cart kicked off the checkout process. Historically, there's usually been a small separation between the two processes (clicking the "checkout" ...


5

If you're clearing out the user basket after a set amount of time that likely means you're holding the information in the browser session and not against the user profile. That would cause one particular issue that I can think of - what if the transaction starts on one device but completes on another? Take this scenario User is out to lunch at work and ...


5

www.eventbrite.com, event management/registration service, uses option #3, which is probably the best approach:


4

I'd go with both. It's a tool to rearrange, remove, add and review your stuff within the shopping process. At this time the visitor might not be ready for the (linear) checkout process. It should have a prominent "Order Now" button. I guess that's where you want to lead your customers, but still you might want them to add more stuff. It's content will show ...


4

Option 2 is so much more comfortable. I hate having to go back and forth between the catalog and the shopping cart. It is nice to add a small cart status widget on the side so people can see what they have in their carts and the total. It is not so difficult to change the default behaviour in an open-source e-commerce cart. I did it with NopCommerce ...


4

First, I noticed the "shopping cart" area on the right and the advice: "Drag item here to shop". I tried dragging one of the large, inviting images from the home page right into the cart, but that didn't work. I then noticed that each image actually represented different sets coming at different prices. I tried dragging the set link on the bar. However, ...


4

I'd do some research over at Design Meltdown. He's collected lots of eCommerce sites, and I'll bet the do alot of different cart designs. Experience them, see which ones works best. http://2010.designmeltdown.com/category/site-types/e-commerce/


4

The reason for this quandary is that in the enterprise backend, each option is a different product, with it's own product ID number, stock level, pricing, etc. As far as most shopping cast systems are concerned, a small t-shirt is as different from a medium t-shirt as apples and oranges. In the case of a site selling t-shirts, it seems that it would be ...


4

While clearing the basket without user knowledge is a bad idea, user still may not want to order items placed in basket before. I would suggest placing three sections in basket view: items added by user during the current session items added by user previously which are available items added by user previously which are unavailable at the moment followed ...


4

I suggest not clearing the basket. You don't know what people store there. However, once I visited a site -- after couple of months -- and was very surprised that the site remembered me, because I didn't remembered this site. However, after that, I added some things to the cart, ok, let's pay... And I almost paid for the things I'd put before, that I ...


4

An important consideration here is stock allocation. There's usually a finite amount of stock available so allocating units to a customer while it's in their basket is the only sane way to ensure you avoid a poor 'no longer in stock' at checkout. On the flip side, you don't want to have stock still allocated to a customer who at that point in time is ...


4

There isn't a definitive "best way" to handle this, as it varies depending on the site design. Showing a confirmation message is best used when you are listing a number of items on a page that a user may want to also add to their shopping cart. It is the method that gets out of the users way the most. Taking a user to a screen where you confirm that the ...



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