New answers tagged

3

There are applications where it's appropriate or even expected to have a large number of user preferences / settings; and there are audiences who enjoy having those settings to twiddle. The history of this particular case strongly suggests that yours is not one of those: one-off configurations that came up as different clients requested new features. ...


4

There are several complementary approaches... ...to reducing complexity. Effective design often relies on an appropriate mix of multiple approaches tailored to your user base. For example, Eclipse users (in another answer here) tend to be professional/expert users who understand how to navigate complexity and may want a lot of control. Google Chrome ...


1

I really like what Eclipse does with the massive number of settings they support. Provide a tree view where settings are grouped logically, not just in groups but in an entire tree hierarchy, and (critically) provide a "quick search" way to filter down to the setting you care about. IntelliJ takes it a step further and actually highlights the matching ...


0

Awesome answers so far. Reduce the number of settings, observe users to see what they need. Provide options in context. If you need to split them into categories, you should really do a card-sort test. That will show you how users think of and cluster the settings in their own minds. From there you can create categories that make sense to your users.


1

Flippant answer: Have less options. Less flippant answer: See if you can reduce the number of options and settings by looking for common patterns of use. Why do you have all of those options, and what do they pertain to? Usually the inclusion of each option is because the answer to a question wasn't known, and so the work of answering it is dumped back on ...


1

You should implement some type of description for the settings, and have a search function that searches the name of the function, its description, and some common words used to describe the settings. On Stack Exchanges, those common words are called tags. Whether you use a list, a hierarchical structure, or a tab based structure, the search ability will ...


5

Remove settings. Period. Ideally, your application has zero settings. Users hate settings, and they take their time away from the core task they are performing. For example, in a drawing app, ideally the user would spend 100% of their time drawing. The way you remove settings is to make design decisions. If your app has an unmanageable amount of settings, ...


2

Group the settings with tabs Taking the image from my recent question, shows some options on how to group the settings using tabs. Option 1 isn't a good solution and is essentially the problem you (and me) began with. Options 2 and 3 are what you should aim for. I believe option 3 is visually the ideal solution but the logical grouping of the settings ...


2

One possible solution is to try and provide those setting or options within the context of where it is relevant to the user, especially if it is likely to be adjusted or changed while the user is using the application (that way they don't have to keep going back to the settings page). Alternatively this can also be a link that is presented as a hint or ...


2

Your second option is the best. Follow what WooCommerce do, they have one of the largest sets of options of any plugin, and they group them logically, not caring if one tab just has one option: Tab contents for usability need to be grouped logically. The label at the top needs to be able to succinctly describe what will be laid out in that tab. From ...


2

Here is an option i think will be great (experimental): Divide all the controls in two groups, common and rare use. Show only the common controls on one page, and add at the bottom an input field that will will ask the user if he needs something else. The user will enter a search query in a natural language: "I want to change the permissions for guest ...


0

The best solution I have seen so far is made by Intuit with their Online TurboTax product. The complexity of the domain is enormous, the price of a mistake is colossal. They've split the whole domain into groups of simple questions. By answering these questions users navigate their way in their tax report. If something is irrelevant to their particular case, ...


1

You ask the most 'intuitive' way ... I think it is when user is able to 'know' at all times where he/she is while updating the settings. With hundreds of settings organized in groups, its easy to 'forget' what was changed and what was not during the course of huge update. A summary of log changes in the side bar (right side for ex: as shown in pic) would be ...



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